The intersection of race, equity and education :: WRAL.com

EDITOR’S NOTE: The following is Mary Ann Wolf’s “Final Word” from the Oct. 10, 2020 broadcast of Education Matters -“Third Annual Color of Education Summit.” Wolf is president and executive director of the Public School Forum of North Carolina.


We kicked off our third annual Color of Education Summit and it looked a little different than our first two summits. Keeping everyone’s health and safety a top priority, this year we are holding four virtual summits over the month of October, allowing for an extended spotlight on the intersection of race, equity and education – and likely providing opportunities for even more people to participate from all across NC.

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This spotlight comes at a

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Elizabeth City is home to three institutions of higher education :: WRAL.com

This article was written for our sponsor, Visit Elizabeth City.

Elizabeth City is home to not one, but three different institutions of higher education: Elizabeth City State University, the College of the Albemarle, and Mid-Atlantic Christian University. From one-of-a-kind programs to valuable community partnerships, each school is using its strengths to benefit the students and communities in Elizabeth City and beyond. Schools in Elizabeth City have experienced rare growth — and they’re ready for their reputations to start making waves across the region.

“At ECSU, this is our third admission cycle under my leadership, and this year we are 13 percent above where we were last year. To grow in double digits when we’re in a pandemic is significant, and so I’m grateful for the work that the faculty, staff, and alumni have put in,” said Chancellor Karrie G. Dixon, ECSU’s current chancellor. “For

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Education post candidates stress need to assure quality instruction to all students :: WRAL.com

EDITOR’S NOTE: The following is Mary Ann Wolf’s “Final Word” from the Oct. 3, 2020 broadcast of Education Matters -“A discussion with the N.C. Superintendent of Public Instruction candidates.” Wolf is president and executive director of the Public School Forum of North Carolina.


Elections matter and we appreciated the opportunity to hear from Dr. Jen Mangrum and Catherine Truitt, the Democratic and Republican candidates for State Superintendent. We are grateful to them for taking time to speak with us and for running for statewide office. Our democracy needs more than ever public servants who are committed to serving in challenging yet incredibly important leadership roles. It’s a significant undertaking to run for office.

VOTE! IT’S A RIGHT & DUTY


REGISTER HERE

Vote by Mail (request a ballot by Oct. 27)
HERE

Vote Early In Person (Oct. 15-Oct. 31)
HERE

Vote On Election Day (Nov. 3)
HERE

MORE VOTER RESOURCES

Speaking

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Cumberland parents have own online classes to help their children with remote learning :: WRAL.com

— School leaders in Cumberland County have put together a program to help parents navigate their children’s virtual educational world.

The Cumberland Family Academy allows parents to log into a Zoom chat room every Thursday evening, where teachers explain the software students are using for remote learning during the coronavirus pandemic. Parents also can ask questions about any problems their children are having online.

“We understand that homework time and virtual learning time can be a challenging time for families,” said Lindsay Whitley, spokesman for Cumberland County Schools. “We want to provide support so that our parents and families feel comfortable in the role of supporting their children at home.”

The online academy is taught in English and Spanish, and the district provides an encore presentation in English every Tuesday on Facebook and YouTube.

Njeri Fikes said her role as a

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‘Double billing’ loophole makes virtual school even harder for special-needs families :: WRAL.com

— A number of families with special-needs students are caught in a government loophole and can’t get in-home help as they try to navigate online-only learning with their children.

In normal times, their children are in school, getting intensely personal help in small classrooms. But with many school systems across North Carolina, including the largest ones in the Triangle, holding online-only classes, that’s happening through a computer screen now.

In normal times, the families can get federally funded waivers to hire in-home help when their children aren’t at school. But virtual learning counts as school, prohibiting parents from getting that help during school hours. Schools get federal funding for special-needs education, and in the U.S. government’s eyes, spending tax dollars on in-home help during the school day counts as double dipping.

“This money’s just sitting there,” said Jennifer Pfaltzgraff, executive director of

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