Childhood and adult trauma create sleepless nights for midlife women

CLEVELAND, Ohio (September 28, 2020)–Sleep disturbances are often reported by postmenopausal women. A new study reports just how prevalent those sleep problems are and that women who endured trauma as children or adults are more likely to suffer poor-quality sleep. Study results will be presented during the 2020 virtual Annual Meeting of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), which opens on September 28.

This study coming out of the University of Pittsburgh used actigraphy, a noninvasive method of monitoring human rest/activity cycles, and measured sleep twice over 5 years. The study involved 166 women aged 40 to 60 years at baseline and primarily tested whether trauma exposure during childhood or adulthood resulted in persistently poor sleep quality in midlife. Although previous studies have demonstrated a similar link, they were largely based on self-reporting of sleep problems at one time point.

Of the participants in the study, 44% reported childhood trauma,

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An Enduring Sense Of Home, The Essentiality Of Women Mentors, Education As The Path For Self And Others

Life is a series of remembered stories. 

For black lives to matter, their stories must matter. For their stories to matter, they must be evoked, listened to, heard, understood with compassion, valued as the unique expression of the human spirit that each story is.”

In May 2014, at a dinner celebrating everything Danielle Allen had accomplished just to gain admission to the Stanford Graduate School of Business—every obstacle she had surmounted, every racist or gender slight she had ever shrugged off—she invited seven other soon-to-graduateclassmates. Almost all were people of color. As our energetic and laughter-filled dinner was finishing, one friend asked to use her iPhone to access the Sonos music system. 

Soon on the garden patio speakers all around—this is Palo Alto, California in Spring, after all—Beyonce was singing “Get Me Bodied”. Everyone started singing, dancing, laughing: “Queen B!” “I love Beyonce and I love this song!” “Beyonce

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