Rep. Ben Cline weighs in on COVID-19, education, prior to election

ROANOKE, Va. (WDBJ) – Incumbent Ben Cline has been around politics for most of his adult life, beginning in 1994 when he began working for his predecessor, Bob Goodlatte.

But even with his time spent in our nation’s capital, he says Virginia will always be home.

“I grew up here in the Shenandoah Valley, met my wife here who grew up here, we have our twin daughters, we live in Botetourt County now,” said Republican Ben Cline, who’s running for reelection in the 6th Congressional District race.

Throughout the last two years, Cline says he’s pleased with what Congress has been able to accomplish, and wants to continue in his position, especially as we continue through the pandemic.

“Rapidly get the research into place, for a vaccine, and continuing, even today, trying to get, help passed through Congress for help for families, for small businesses, here in the 6th District,”

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Greenwich school board weighs in on audit of special education services

GREENWICH — The independence of a new audit of special education services in the Greenwich Public Schools is among the most important facets of the review, several Board of Education members said Tuesday.

The school board heard an update on the $98,000 audit, which will officially begin this month, at its Tuesday meeting. The audit is an attempt to examine complaints from parents about the district’s special education services going back decades.

“I, for one, am glad this is finally starting,” Board of Education Chair Peter Bernstein said. “I think we’ve been talking about it for about three years, so it’s good to see it finally moving forward. One of the concerns I have and I will continue to have is about the independence.”

Board member Peter Sherr drove home the point of acting independently.

“This project is really an audit of special education districtwide,” Sherr said. “I’m not familiar

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Oregon Department of Corrections weighs cutting ties with community colleges, moving education in-house

The Oregon Department of Corrections is weighing ending its connections to community colleges across the state and proposing to move its education program in-house because of a budget shortfall.

The DOC currently contracts with six community colleges in Oregon to provide high school diploma equivalency services to inmates across its 14 facilities.

Department of Corrections communications manager Jennifer Black told Oregon Public Broadcasting that DOC is proposing the contracts be phased out and the agency hire back those positions as part of the DOC permanent budget going forward.

She said nearly 1,000 inmates were enrolled in the Adult Basic Skill Development program as of Sept. 30.

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, contractors were unable to enter the institutions and ABS (Adult Basic Skills) programming could not be adapted and continued during operation modifications,” she said. “Converting contractor funding to DOC staff positions will allow the department to continue ABS programming during

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Commission weighs new way to determine education adequacy | New Hampshire

CONCORD, N.H. — The education funding commission is exploring a different approach to determining an adequate education and how to distribute money to achieve the goal.

Instead of an input method with parameters and set amounts of per-pupil aid, the commission wants to use a system that determines how much each school district needs in total money to achieve the state average for student outcomes.

Each school’s outcomes are based on assessment scores, graduation rates and attendance rates.

Under the model developed by American Institutes for Research, the model projects the amount per student each school needs to provide its students with the opportunity to achieve the state average outcome, and then uses a weighting formula to reach the amount of money needed.

The current formula is not based on outcomes, but has a basic per-pupil grant of about $3,700 per student and then provides additional state stipends for students

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