5 things that show students aren’t the only ones learning during the pandemic

Sally Purchase describes teaching in 2020 as taking an “old bag of tricks,” and trying to adapt them to a completely new environment.



a young boy standing next to a building: Esperance, 6, and Christina Maneno, 8, pose for a portrait as they return to Jefferson Elementary School on Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2020.


© Cory Morse | MLive.com/Cory Morse | MLive.com/mlive.com/TNS
Esperance, 6, and Christina Maneno, 8, pose for a portrait as they return to Jefferson Elementary School on Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2020.

“Never in my 33 years of teaching did I ever think it would be like this,” the Muskegon High School teacher said of virtual learning, which the district is using this semester to mitigate the spread of the coronavirus.

“It’s a huge learning curve.”

With Michigan K-12 schools back in session for the fall – some virtually, some in-person, and some a mix of both – students aren’t the only ones doing the learning this year. Amid this unprecedented school year, teachers are learning some new things along the way, too.

The coronavirus pandemic has changed almost

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Nashville schoolroom helps single parents with students’ online learning

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, several metropolitan cities are still holding school entirely online, but that’s posed a lot of challenges for families — especially single parents who can’t work from home or can’t help their children while working from home.

One nonprofit in Nashville is doing everything it can to ensure as many children as possible are getting their education.

Chanwnika Sander is a single mother of Tristan, a 4th grader at a KIPP school in Nashville.

“His dad was taken to the … prison system, so he was gone for the majority of Tristan’s life, so I have been the sole support for him since … since he came out,” Sanders said.

She’s not alone. According to Metro Social Services, more than 13% of households in Nashville are run by single mothers, compared to 4% run by fathers.

Helping families out

When the pandemic

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Students Unhappy with Their Online College Courses

Just as substitute teachers usually weren’t very good, so we’re finding that substitute educational delivery modes aren’t very good. So argues Megan Zogby in today’s Martin Center article.

Younger faculty members tend to be more comfortable with the online technology; older ones are making the adjustment more slowly. A bigger problem is the lack of access to hands-on experiences.

Zogby writes, “For some students, the loss of in-person lab time and learning has dramatically harmed their education.The interactive labs seem more like video games, said Paige Barrett, a junior at NC State studying life sciences. Her online lab portal cost her $50 to access, and it ‘looked like it was made by a second-grader,’ she said.”

Students in art and design courses are getting badly short-changed.

“When NC State switched to online classes for the fall,” writes Zogby, “Leah Hauser, a junior in the Art and Design program, lost access

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Old learning concept can help students without resources learn online amid the pandemic

DENVER (KDVR) – Schools long-used to in-person classes have been forced to try new tactics to keep students safe amid the COVID-19 pandemic, and some are turning to an old concept to make online learning more successful.

Thousands of students in the Adams 12 school district are getting a boost in their remote education with the help of learning pods, a years-old concept that physically brings students together in a common space with adult support.

“It’s a lot more helpful because we get to be with someone who could help us in our classroom,” said 10-year-old Christina Chavez, a 5th grader at Hillcrest Elementary School.  “At home, our parents could (help me), but sometimes they couldn’t understand all the stuff because it’s different from what they learned.”

Christina Chavez, a 5th grader, enjoys attending a learning pod at Hillcrest Elementary School in Colorado (KDVR Photo/Lori Jane Gliha)
Christina Chavez, a 5th grader, attends a learning pod at Hillcrest Elementary School in Colorado (KDVR Photo/Lori Jane Gliha)

Chavez is among nearly

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Opinion: Online learning can be eye-opening for both teachers and students

Goolsby Elementary School third grader Ava Dweck, 9, takes an online class at a friend’s home during the first week of distance learning for the Clark County School District on August 25, 2020 in Las Vegas, Nev.

Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Mark Lautens is a professor of chemistry at the University of Toronto.

Toronto is recognized as one of the most diverse cities in the world. That message is preached by our politicians and civic leaders and we live it every day as we walk the streets and interact with our fellow citizens.

More than ever, universities are working hard to have that diversity reflected in our classrooms. Progress is slow, sometimes very slow.

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Oddly the world of virtual learning is revealing diversity that would otherwise be more or less invisible to someone standing at the front of a classroom giving a lecture to a mass of

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Uni students prefer online learning: study

The survey was carried out in August and involved more than 500 postgraduate students across Australia.

Colette Rogers, head of the national education practice at Deloitte, said the message for universities was that students do not want to go back to the old ways of learning when conditions return to normal.

“The pandemic has improved postgraduate students’ perception of digital learning. For universities the future is probably blended, a mix of face-to- face learning and online.”

Ms Rogers said the report was intended to guide investment by universities and showed they could afford a greater focus on technology.

There were some anomalies – more of the face-to-face students reported that their qualification helped them get a job than was reported by fully online students.

This was probably because most fully online students were based in remote locations, which affected their employment chances.

And evidence from earlier Deloitte studies reinforced the

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Nearly 1 in 3 Oregon students learning in-person attend private schools, election 2020 preview: The week in education

An Oregonian/OregonLive analysis of state education data found that 30% of students who attended in-person classes the week of Sept. 28-Oct. 2 are enrolled in private schools.

All told, 550 Oregon schools offered some form of in-person instruction that week, teaching some 46,000 students. One hundred and seventy of those schools are private and taught 13,000 students in-person, state Department of Education figures show.

That means 6% of the state’s 560,000 K-12 students visited a classroom last week. The share of private students in the overall population is about 2%.

In order for school districts to allow in-person instruction, the county they’re in must meet specific coronavirus set by the state. If a district or school draws 10% or more of its workforce or enrollment from more than one county, both must meet the metrics in order for the district to open its classrooms.

That’s the case in Portland Public

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Donaldson Donates 200 Laptops to Support Educational Success for Underserved Students’ Remote Learning at Prodeo Academy

Leaders at Donaldson Company, Inc. and members of the company’s corporate tutor team delivered 200 laptops to Prodeo Academy, a network of tuition-free preparatory schools in the Twin Cities metro area that develop students in PreK-8th grades to be critical thinkers and reflective leaders.

When the pandemic necessitated the transition to online learning, Prodeo asked the public for donations to help secure computers, as it only had laptops for approximately half of its 700 students. Donaldson Company, with a long history of addressing the needs of its local communities and helping transform lives, leaned into the opportunity of providing technology to support underserved students and promote educational success. Donaldson purchased the computers from Best Buy, which helped provide the laptops that can be tough to find due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We stand united, together with the broader business community, in our commitment to creating lasting, sustainable change,” said

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As remote learning continues, districts boost outreach to students – News – telegram.com

WORCESTER — The school system’s switch to remote learning this year has created unprecedented hardships. But it may have also pushed the district to more fully address a problem that existed even before the pandemic, according to the school superintendent.

This fall, the district has rolled out a number of new initiatives aimed at keeping track of struggling students and providing more information to parents about their kids’ academic performance, Worcester Schools Superintendent Maureen Binienda said.

Those types of efforts are even more critical now that school staff are not able to physically interact with students during the ongoing remote learning phase of the new school year.

“I think the remote has actually caused some good practices to be expanded,” Binienda said. “We have to find more ways to keep track of kids.”

The district’s new approaches include twice-a-week check-ins with students, a more “aggressive” assessment system, and an update

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UTSA’s growing online degree programs offer students flexibility | UTSA Today | UTSA

UTSA’s growing online degree programs offer students flexibility

OCTOBER 9, 2020 — UTSA continues to see growth in its online degree programs. Currently there are 340 students enrolled in these fully online degree programs, which is an increase of 66% over last year’s enrollment. Growth is expected to continue in the spring, when a new degree program will be added.

The COVID-19 pandemic’s current disruption of education around the world demonstrates the value that comes from the flexibility of online courses.

“The pandemic has shined a blinding light on the need for online courses and the fact that online courses can be taught at the level of traditional courses,” said Suzana Diaz Rosencrans, assistant vice provost for online programs. “You don’t have to sacrifice quality to do that. I see the pandemic accelerating the timeline of online degrees offered.”

Not to be confused with the high percentage of courses currently being offered online at UTSA in response to

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