Education Commissioner Seeks Full In-Person Return Despite Rising COVID Cases

State education officials say their information shows local students aren’t catching COVID-19 in schools; that’s part of their plea to parents urging them to allow their kids to return to the classroom amid the pandemic.

While the state experiences an uptick in cases, Connecticut’s Department of Education reports that less than one percent of the K-12 student body has tested positive for COVID-19 since many students went back to in-person learning for the fall.

“The evidence so far suggests that the cases that schools are reporting to us may really be originating from activities that happen outside of school rather than transmission within the school, so we’re really not hearing from [the state Dept. of Public Health] that transmission is happening in our schools,” said Ajit Gopalakrishnan, CSDE’s chief performance officer.

Reporting as of October 7 shows that since schools began hosting students on August 27, 421 students – along

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Metro Denver counties with rising COVID-19 cases hope public education, targeted orders will stave off new stay-at-home mandates

New COVID-19 cases have increased in much of the Denver metro area, and county health departments are trying to persuade their residents they need to keep their distance to avoid new stay-at-home orders.

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s new dial framework places each county in one of five color-coded levels, with increasing restrictions on business capacity and event sizes.

Each county’s level is based on the rate of new cases compared to population, the percentage of COVID-19 tests coming back positive and how hospitalizations are trending.

As of Friday, 15 counties, or almost one-quarter of the state’s counties, had rates of new cases that could push them to issue additional restrictions if nothing changes. They get at least two weeks to bring the numbers down before more restrictions are on the table, though.

Unlike this spring, when businesses across the state were ordered to shut down, counties

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AG Grewal: Anti-bias education will help us fight a rising tide of hate | Opinion

By Gurbir Grewal and Rachel Wainer Apter

At last week’s presidential debate, when it seemed that the nation had exhausted its capacity for shock, President Trump hit another height in racist rhetoric, refusing to condemn white supremacy while urging far-right extremists to “stand back and stand by.” As the top officials responsible for enforcing the civil rights laws of New Jersey — one of the most populous and diverse states in the country — we have seen firsthand how the president’s push to normalize bias has led to a rising tide of hate and violence in our state.

Since 2015, the number of bias incidents being reported to law enforcement in New Jersey has skyrocketed. There were 367 reported incidents in 2015, compared to 994 in 2019 — a 170% increase. And this isn’t a problem limited to older generations — fully 46% of bias offenders were younger than 18

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PPHS preparing rising senior class to take a big step in their education

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Four years ago, Colten Lewis was a fledgling freshman starting a new school – a school that, at that time, had no track record. It was Purdue University’s grand experiment. Purdue Polytechnic High School is a unique charter school experience intended to offer hands-on education focusing on the STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) areas.

Today, Lewis is a senior, and come spring, he will be part of a first: Purdue Polytechnic High School’s inaugural graduating class.

For Lewis, it has worked out just as one would map out the formative high school years. He entered thinking he wanted to be an engineer. At the moment, he is looking toward business and entrepreneurship. He credits the school’s hands-on opportunities for guiding him. 

The school has embraced his interest for management and entrepreneurship, letting Lewis and a fellow student work through the logistics of starting a school

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The Rising Gen Z Tide: Barnes & Noble Education Survey Finds 94% of Currently and Soon-to-Be Registered College Students Plan to Vote in 2020

BASKING RIDGE, N.J.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Barnes & Noble Education, Inc. (NYSE: BNED), a leading solutions provider for the education industry, today announced findings from Conversations with Gen Z®: The 2020 Election Report, Second Edition. Conducted by Barnes & Noble College Insights™, the report looks at the attitudes and perspectives of Gen Z college students across the U.S. as they plan for the 2020 presidential election. The 2020 Election Report, First Edition, was released in June 2019.

Early and Mail-in Voting Lead with Gen Z Students

This year’s report shows that, while the majority (94%) of registered and soon-to-be registered Gen Z students plan to vote, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a notable impact on how and why they plan to do so. One third (32%) of surveyed students report feeling nervous about voting in-person due to COVID-19, and more than half (60%) say they plan to vote early or by

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The Rising Gen Z Tide: Barnes & Noble Education Survey Finds 94% of Currently and Soon-to-Be Registered College Students Plan to Vote in 2020 | Region

BASKING RIDGE, N.J.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Sep 23, 2020–

Barnes & Noble Education, Inc. (NYSE: BNED), a leading solutions provider for the education industry, today announced findings from Conversations with Gen Z®: The 2020 Election Report, Second Edition. Conducted by Barnes & Noble College Insights ™, the report looks at the attitudes and perspectives of Gen Z college students across the U.S. as they plan for the 2020 presidential election. The 2020 Election Report, First Edition, was released in June 2019.

Early and Mail-in Voting Lead with Gen Z Students

This year’s report shows that, while the majority (94%) of registered and soon-to-be registered Gen Z students plan to vote, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a notable impact on how and why they plan to do so. One third (32%) of surveyed students report feeling nervous about voting in-person due to COVID-19, and more than half (60%) say they plan to vote early

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