Abdul Aziz Al Ghurair Refugee Education Fund Partners with Discovery Education

DUBAI, UAE–29 September, 2020:  The Abdul Aziz Al Ghurair Refugee Education Fund (REF) has announced a new first of its kind partnership with Discovery Education to deliver award winning online learning, increasing access to education for thousands of refugees and vulnerable youth in Lebanon.

The Abdul Aziz Al Ghurair Covid-19 Online Learning Emergency Fund for Refugee Education, was launched by H.E. Abdul Aziz Al Ghurair in April 2020 to ensure vulnerable populations are able to continue their learning without interruption. This partnership with Discovery Education will help fill the educational gaps that have emerged because of the COVID -19 crisis. This program will reach 5,000 at-risk students in addition to over 17,500 students already being helped by REF in Jordan, Lebanon, and the UAE.

As part of the partnership with the Abdul Aziz Al Ghurair Refugee Education Fund, and for the first time ever, Discovery Education will collaborate with

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UNHCR urges more support for refugee higher education to withstand impact of COVID-19 pandemic – World

This is a summary of what was said by UNHCR spokesperson Shabia Mantoo – to whom quoted text may be attributed – at today’s press briefing at the Palais des Nations in Geneva.

With only three per cent of refugees accessing higher education, UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, is urging governments and donors to help bridge critical gaps by ensuring the inclusion of refugee students in national education systems and the continuity of tertiary education programs, as well as offering more places for refugees.

The COVID-19 pandemic has been tough for students and especially for refugees, many of whom – 85 per cent – reside in developing or least developed countries. With some affected by school closures, remote learning is not always available and even if so, mobile phones, tablets, laptops, TV and radio sets as well as internet connectivity are often not accessible to those displaced.

The socio-economic consequences

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Dubai’s Refugee Education Fund launches new programme to educate 5,000 refugee children in Lebanon

The scheme will provide access to digital learning resources aligned to the Lebanese curriculum for students in Grade 8 to 12.
Image Credit: Supplied

Dubai: Around 5,000 refugee children in Lebanon, whose education is at risk, will get access to online learning under a new partnership between Dubai-based The Abdul Aziz Al Ghurair Refugee Education Fund (REF) and digital platform Discovery Education.

‘The Abdul Aziz Al Ghurair COVID-19 Online Learning Emergency Fund for Refugee Education’ was launched by Abdul Aziz Al Ghurair in April to ensure vulnerable populations are able to continue their learning without interruption. The partnership with Discovery Education will help fill the educational gaps that have emerged because of the pandemic. This programme will reach 5,000 at-risk students in addition to over 17,500 students already being helped by REF in Jordan, Lebanon, and the UAE.

As part of the partnership with REF, and for the first time

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DAFI Annual Report 2019 – Refugee Students in Higher Education – World

Executive Summary

Over its 28-year history, the DAFI programme has supported more than 18,000 young refugee women and men to pursue their undergraduate degrees. DAFI remains the longest running and largest standalone tertiary scholarship programme for refugees and returnees, currently serving students in 54 countries. The idea underpinning the DAFI programme is simple but powerful: that talented, passionate students should be supported to thrive, pursue their dreams and become leaders in their fields of study and their communities. DAFI scholars have done just that and they continue to succeed beyond expectation. In 2019, a record number of 8,347 students were enrolled on DAFI scholarships. 1,063 of them earned their degrees in 2019, enriching and adding value to the academic communities and countries that host them and inspiring the thousands of young people that follow in their footsteps.

DAFI has grown rapidly since its inception, particularly over the last five years.

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Mo Salah is calling for better education for refugee children

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Mo Salah wants all children to receive quality education including refugees

Liverpool football player Mo Salah is well known for his skills on the pitch, but he’s also been using his platform to call for better education for the world’s refugee children.

The forward, who is an ambassador for the UN Refugee Agency’s programme Instant Network Schools, gave a speech to world leaders during the first-ever virtual UN General Assembly on Tuesday.

He argued that every child, including refugees, should be given access to a good standard of education,

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Refugee children living in some of the world’s least developed communities have seen big disruptions to their education because of the coronavirus

Salah has worked with refugee students from schools in Kenya, Tanzania and South Sudan to highlight the importance of a good education for all to some of the world’s

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U.N. Program Connects Schools in Lebanon With Refugee Students | Best Countries

BEIRUT – Around the world, COVID-19 has forced school shutdowns and left parents, teachers and students alike struggling with the sudden switch to online learning.

But the transition has been particularly hard for communities with limited access to the internet and mobile devices. In Lebanon, for instance, a majority of the more than 200,000 Palestinian refugees living in the country are below the poverty line.

About 30% of the 37,000 students enrolled in schools run by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) missed out on classes last spring because of difficulties accessing online learning, says Salem Dib, chief of UNRWA’s Field Education Program in Lebanon.

“The digital divide, let me call it, is that some students were not able to join due to unavailability of smart devices, or internet costs or similar issues,” Dib says. “So, because of this, it was

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