Want to fight racism? That makes you ‘un-American’ in Trump’s book

Watch out Seattle.

There is a totalitarian, cult indoctrination under way to promote toxic propaganda, through anti-American re-education camps. 

What is this insidious force? Anti-racism training and education.

Yes, the latest target in the Trump administration’s culture war is attacking previously obscure academic disciplines like critical race theory and trainings designed to unpack and dismantle our country’s legacy of racism. 

The topic even came up at the debate, with the president saying anti-racist trainings lead people to “hate our country.” 

It may sound like just another rhetorical volley to rally the base, but it’s become much more than that. In late August, the U.S. Department of Justice took aim at the “anarchist jurisdiction” of Seattle’s racial justice training led by the Seattle Office for Civil Rights, questioning whether it violated civil rights. 

Then in early September, the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) sent out a memo to instruct

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How Racism Slowly Chips Away at Black People’s Health

Enduring is all I have. It’s what my ancestors passed on.

This is Race and Medicine, a series dedicated to unearthing the uncomfortable and sometimes life-threatening truth about racism in healthcare. By highlighting the experiences of Black people and honoring their health journeys, we look to a future where medical racism is a thing of the past.


A close relative asked if I watched the full videos of the most recent series of “open season” on Black life: the violence against Jacob Blake, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd, to name a few.

The truth is, I don’t have the mental or emotional capacity to endure watching these videos.

I’m just trying to stay well so I don’t compromise my immune system and catch a life threatening virus that’s attacking people’s respiratory systems. Meanwhile, the resurgence of the Black Lives Matter Movement is ironically echoed by the slogan “I can’t breathe.”

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It’s not up to Indigenous people to educate everyone else about racism | Bendigo Advertiser

Over the last year, we’ve seen many non-Indigenous people with only the best of intentions, reach out to their Indigenous friends and contacts so they can better understand racial and cultural issues affecting society. While that’s a good sentiment, we think it’s important that non-Indigenous people start to do more to educate themselves to help alleviate racism and cultural insensitivity within Australia. The problem is that for any Indigenous person it becomes exhausting. It becomes a 24-7 job, constantly helping people better comprehend the historical and cultural issues at play. In our training and our book, we use the 1/30 rule to help illustrate the point. If the Australian population was a classroom of 30 children, only one of those would be Indigenous. In that situation, it would be up to the 29 children out of 30 to learn more and do more – not for that one person to

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It’s not up to Indigenous people to educate everyone else about racism | The Canberra Times

news, latest-news,

Over the last year, we’ve seen many non-Indigenous people with only the best of intentions, reach out to their Indigenous friends and contacts so they can better understand racial and cultural issues affecting society. While that’s a good sentiment, we think it’s important that non-Indigenous people start to do more to educate themselves to help alleviate racism and cultural insensitivity within Australia. The problem is that for any Indigenous person it becomes exhausting. It becomes a 24-7 job, constantly helping people better comprehend the historical and cultural issues at play. In our training and our book, we use the 1/30 rule to help illustrate the point. If the Australian population was a classroom of 30 children, only one of those would be Indigenous. In that situation, it would be up to the 29 children out of 30 to learn more and do more – not for that one

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Schools seize momentum to tackle racism, achievement gaps

Minnesota schools, reopening amid a pandemic and a national reckoning over systemic racism, are sharpening their focus on the state’s decadeslong problems with achievement gaps and educational disparities.

Around the state, schools are adding new staff to focus on equity in classroom instruction and hiring, and approving policies that define — and disavow — racism. Some are contemplating changes to classroom materials and curriculum. Groups of students, alumni, teachers and principals have organized to lobby superintendents and school boards, calling on them to be more active and outspoken to combat racism in schools.

Educators say the momentum sparked by George Floyd’s killing by Minneapolis police, and the disparities laid bare by the pandemic, may do more to transform schools than other efforts of the recent past. Jessica Davis, a racial equity coach for St. Louis Park Public Schools — and the 2019 Minnesota Teacher of the Year — said the

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Department of Education investigating Princeton after school acknowledges systemic racism

Federal authorities launched a sweeping probe of Princeton University after the Ivy League school acknowledged the role systemic racism has played on its campus, the school said Thursday.

The 274-year-old university published a letter from Department of Education Assistant Secretary Robert King saying that Princeton could be asked to return federal funds it has received — totaling $75 million since 2013 — when university President Christopher L. Eisgruber took office.

King focused on a Sept. 2 statement by Eisgruber announcing efforts Princeton would take to combat systemic racism.

“Based on its admitted racism, the U.S. Department of Education is concerned Princeton’s nondiscrimination and equal opportunity assurances in its Program Participation Agreements from at least 2013 to the present may have been false,” King wrote. “The Department is further concerned Princeton perhaps knew, or should have known, these assurances were false at the time they were made.”

The department’s probe of

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Let’s work harder to end racism, health disparities

The effects of COVID-19 are inseparable from systemic racism, and the first step to solving a problem is recognizing its existence.

Cities and counties in my home state of Ohio have led the charge in declaring racism a public health crisis. And I joined colleagues Sens. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) and Cory Booker (D-N.J.) to continue the effort at the federal level.

We introduced a Senate resolution that declares racism a national public health crisis, and acknowledges the systemic barriers that people of color, especially Black Americans, continue to face in our healthcare system.

Of course we know a resolution alone won’t solve the problems created by centuries of racism; systemic racism still exists—and is perpetuated—in so many of our societal institutions. This resolution is an important step toward recognizing the racial disparities in healthcare while also outlining concrete actions that we can take now to help reverse these disparities.

This

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Education Department launches investigation after Princeton’s president confronts ‘systemic racism’ on campus

“On September 2, 2020, you admitted Princeton’s educational program is and for decades has been racist,” the Education Department stated in a letter to the university. It cited school President Christopher L. Eisgruber’s statements that racism and the damage it does to people of color persist at Princeton, and that racist assumptions remain embedded in the structures of the university.

Like many universities and other institutions across the country in a summer of racial reckoning, Princeton has been delving into its history and asking what changes it could make. The department’s letter comes at a politically fraught time, weeks before the election, when President Trump has moved to overhaul federal agencies’ racial sensitivity trainings and called for a “pro-American” curriculum in schools that “celebrates the truth about our nation’s great history.”

On Thursday, Trump said that U.S. schools are indoctrinating children with a left-wing agenda and that the result could

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Education Department Investigates Princeton After University Admits to Systemic Racism | Education News

The White House has opened an investigation into Princeton University, accusing it of civil rights violations after its president admitted racism exists at the school.

Earlier this month, Princeton President Christopher Eisgruber published a letter to the university community in which he acknowledged that the university has and continues to be shaped by systemic racism.

“Racism and the damage it does to people of color nevertheless persist at Princeton as in our society, sometimes by conscious intention but more often through unexamined assumptions and stereotypes, ignorance or insensitivity, and the systemic legacy of past decisions and policies,” he wrote, underscoring also that for most of Princeton’s history, the university “intentionally and systematically excluded people of color, women, Jews, and other minorities.”

“Racist assumptions from the past also remain embedded in structures of the University itself,” he added, noting that, for example, Princeton has at least nine departments and programs organized

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