America’s gifted education programs have a race problem. Can it be fixed?

This article about gifted education was produced in partnership with The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education. This is part 1 of the series “Gifted Education’s Race Problem.”

BUFFALO, N.Y. — On a crisp day in early March, two elementary school gifted and talented classes worked on activities in two schools, 3 miles and a world apart.

In airy PS 64 Frederick Law Olmsted, in affluent, white north Buffalo, 22 would-be Arctic explorers wrestled with how to build a shelter if their team leader had frostbite and snow blindness. Unusually for Buffalo’s public schools — where 20 percent of students are white and 46 percent are Black — about half of the fourth grade class was white.

In PS 61 Arthur O. Eve, on the city’s majority-Black East Side, 13 first graders, all of them Black, Latino or Asian American, folded paper

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The intersection of race, equity and education :: WRAL.com

EDITOR’S NOTE: The following is Mary Ann Wolf’s “Final Word” from the Oct. 10, 2020 broadcast of Education Matters -“Third Annual Color of Education Summit.” Wolf is president and executive director of the Public School Forum of North Carolina.


We kicked off our third annual Color of Education Summit and it looked a little different than our first two summits. Keeping everyone’s health and safety a top priority, this year we are holding four virtual summits over the month of October, allowing for an extended spotlight on the intersection of race, equity and education – and likely providing opportunities for even more people to participate from all across NC.

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This spotlight comes at a

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Creating A Positive Sum Education System Could Stop Students From Running A Rat Race To Nowhere

With mental health challenges on the rise for students—and Covid-19 exacerbating the situation—many have pointed a finger at how students throughout the country compete against each other for a variety of honors, including most prominently chasing admission to prestigious colleges.

It’s not new to note that this competition is often for extrinsic reasons—out of a desire to be the best for its own sake, not for the intrinsic value of the experience students will get to enjoy—and creates an endless cycle of competition for its own

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Nevada Board of Education: Hughes, Casino in race for seat

Two candidates — both of whom have classroom teaching experience — are running for the District 1 seat on the Nevada State Board of Education.

Tim Hughes and Angelo Casino are vying for a spot on the board during the Nov. 3 general election.

The 11-member board — with four members who are elected and seven appointed — is the governing body of the Nevada Department of Education. The District 1 seat is currently held by Robert Blakely, who isn’t running for reelection.

Casino is a teacher at Somerset Academy Lone Mountain, a public charter school, and teaches sixth-grade social studies.

“I’m in the classroom with the kids every day,” he said in mid-August. He said he sees the impact of the decisions the State Board of Education makes and wants to be a voice for students.

Hughes — a former middle school science teacher and principal — is a

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Unequal education: Pandemic widens race, class gaps in U.S. schools

YORK, Pa. (Reuters) – Natalie Cruz, 12, missed math and language arts instruction one recent morning because the school’s virtual interface would not load. Carlos, her 8-year-old brother, sat beside her at the kitchen table, studying with last year’s workbooks because the district had yet to supply him with a PC, weeks after instruction started online.

Belen Cruz tries to help her daughter, Natalie, log on to her school’s online learning platform at their home in York, Pennsylvania, U.S. September 18, 2020. The online platform would not load for almost an hour, during which Natalie was not able to get any school work done. Picture taken September 18, 2020. REUTERS/Rachel Wisniewski

Across town, Zachary and Zeno Lentz, 5 and 9, were at their high-performing elementary schools, where they attend in-person on Tuesdays and Fridays. They learn remotely the other three days, assisted by their college-educated mother, a social worker who

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Unequal Education: Pandemic Widens Race, Class Gaps in U.S. Schools | Top News

YORK, Pa. (Reuters) – Natalie Cruz, 12, missed math and language arts instruction one recent morning because the school’s virtual interface would not load. Carlos, her 8-year-old brother, sat beside her at the kitchen table, studying with last year’s workbooks because the district had yet to supply him with a PC, weeks after instruction started online.

Across town, Zachary and Zeno Lentz, 5 and 9, were at their high-performing elementary schools, where they attend in-person on Tuesdays and Fridays. They learn remotely the other three days, assisted by their college-educated mother, a social worker who can do her job from home.

The Cruz and Lentz children are separated by just a few miles in York, Pennsylvania. But they are a world apart in educational opportunities, a gap education experts say has widened amid the disruption of the coronavirus pandemic.     

Belen Cruz, a single mother and nurse, is most worried about

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Pandemic widens race, class gaps in U.S. schools

By Nathan Layne

YORK, Pa. (Reuters) – Natalie Cruz, 12, missed math and language arts instruction one recent morning because the school’s virtual interface would not load. Carlos, her 8-year-old brother, sat beside her at the kitchen table, studying with last year’s workbooks because the district had yet to supply him with a PC, weeks after instruction started online.

Across town, Zachary and Zeno Lentz, 5 and 9, were at their high-performing elementary schools, where they attend in-person on Tuesdays and Fridays. They learn remotely the other three days, assisted by their college-educated mother, a social worker who can do her job from home.

    The Cruz and Lentz children are separated by just a few miles in York, Pennsylvania. But they are a world apart in educational opportunities, a gap education experts say has widened amid the disruption of the coronavirus pandemic.     

    Belen Cruz, a single mother and nurse, is

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Massachusetts poll: Race, education, gender may influence some divergent views about death

Last Words, a three-part Globe Spotlight Team series, exposes the inequities that follow people in Massachusetts to their very last breaths. It is a deep examination into the uncomfortable topic of death, and confronts the state’s failure to protect its most vulnerable in the early days of a historic pandemic. Read the Globe Spotlight report.

A Boston Globe-Suffolk University poll late last year shows that, for the most part, Massachusetts residents share widespread agreement on issues related to the difficult subject of death.

They say society would be better off if end-of-life issues were discussed more openly and believe terminally ill patients should have more options to choose when and how to die. A sizable majority say they would prefer to die at home, and many men and women have first-hand experience with hospice, according to the poll of some 500 residents across the state.

But some major —

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Race, education, gender may influence some divergent views about death

Last Words, a three-part Globe Spotlight Team series, exposes the inequities that follow people in Massachusetts to their very last breaths. It is a deep examination into the uncomfortable topic of death, and confronts the state’s failure to protect its most vulnerable in the early days of a historic pandemic. Read the Globe Spotlight report.



a person sitting at a table in front of a mirror: Danvers resident John Barbieri looks over a collage of photos of his late wife, Ann "Peachie" Barbieri. They were married for more than 60 years.


© Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff
Danvers resident John Barbieri looks over a collage of photos of his late wife, Ann “Peachie” Barbieri. They were married for more than 60 years.

A Boston Globe-Suffolk University poll late last year shows that, for the most part, Massachusetts residents share widespread agreement on issues related to the difficult subject of death.

They say society would be better off if end-of-life issues were discussed more openly and believe terminally ill patients should have more options to choose when and how to die. A sizable majority say they would

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THE REGULARS: Troubling critical race theory surfaces in education, government | Columnists

“The President has a proven track record of standing for those whose voice has long been ignored and who have failed to benefit from all our country has to offer, and he intends to continue to support all Americans, regardless of race, religion, or creed,” Vought wrote.

“The divisive, false, and demeaning propaganda of the critical race theory movement is contrary to all we stand for as Americans and should have no place in the Federal government,” he concluded.

Our college-educated students are being sold a lie that capitalism is inherently evil and racist when, in fact, it has improved more lives and done less harm than any other form of economic policy. In my view, CRT promotes revolution by class warfare from within and in redistribution of wealth by force, and this is what we see in the rioters.

Your life is no more or less valued because of

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