A Guide to Education Rights During the Pandemic / Public News Service

A new guide says schools need to ensure that all remote learners have full-day access to a computer and reliable internet service. (fizkes/Adobe Stock)

September 22, 2020

PHILADELPHIA — Parents and students struggling to understand how their right to an education is affected by the COVID pandemic can find answers in an online back-to-school guide.

The guide, compiled by the Education Law Center, makes the point that, despite the unprecedented challenges facing schools this year, students continue to deserve equitable, affirming and culturally responsive school spaces. According to Hetal Dhagat, a staff attorney at the Center, this year’s guide also addresses the need for schools to change policies and practices that make learning spaces unsafe for students, especially students of color.

“We want families to know that whether your child is receiving their education in-person, virtually or through a hybrid model, they still retain their important public-education rights,” Dhagat said.

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Vision Help Foundation Improves Public Health by Rebuilding Homes in Rural Haiti to Save Lives, Reduce Disease, and Improve Quality of Life

Press release content from Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

ST. LOUIS & LAVAUD, Haiti – September 20, 2020 – ( Newswire.com )

St. Louis-based Vision Help Foundation is assisting to improve housing in Lavaud, a small rural community in Haiti. Substandard housing, often with leaky roofs and dirt floors, can cause deadly accidents, frequent illness, and miserable daily experiences.

VHF recently rebuilt and modernized a home occupied by a widow with 11 children. Their roof leaked so bad she was forced to gather all the children in the only dry corner of their home. It was difficult to sleep during the rainy season. There was constant fear the roof would collapse. And children often came down with serious illnesses like pneumonia and parasitic infestations.

The house is fixed and the mother now spends her limited funds on clothing and sheets

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Vision Help Foundation Improves Public Health by Rebuilding Homes in Rural Haiti to Save Lives, Reduce Disease, and Improve Quality of Life – Press Release


ST. LOUIS – September 20, 2020 – (Newswire.com)

​Lavaud, Haiti – St. Louis based Vision Help Foundation is assisting to improve housing in this small rural community in Haiti. Substandard housing, often with leaky roofs and dirt floors can cause deadly accidents, frequent illness, and miserable daily experiences.

VHF recently rebuilt and modernized a home occupied by a widow with 11 children. Their roof leaked so bad she was forced to gather all the children in the only dry corner of their home. It was difficult to sleep during the rainy season. There was constant fear the roof would collapse. And children often came down with serious illnesses like pneumonia, and parasitic infestations.

The house is fixed, and the mother now spends her limited funds on clothing and sheets for her children.

“This type of substandard housing is common in rural Haiti and impoverished areas in many parts of the

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Oregon Department of Education issues ban on hate symbols in public schools

The Oregon Department of Education issued a temporary ban on hate symbols — including the Confederate flag, swastikas and nooses — in public school classrooms in the state, officials said.

The “All Students Belong” rule was adopted unanimously by the state Board of Education on Thursday. Colt Gill, the director of the Department of Education, said the move came as a response to student calls for a ban.

“Our students called us out and into action,” Gill said in a statement. “The Oregon Department of Education is committed to ensuring that Oregon’s schools are safe and inclusive for all students and staff, and the All Students Belong rule is an important step in that process.”

The rule, which took effect immediately, requires school districts to implement policies by Jan. 1 that prohibit the hate symbols, except as part of the teaching curriculum. Officials said that many districts already had similar

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Families, leaders in special education protest Boston Public Schools’ plan

But the district’s latest plan calls for students with the highest needs to return to schools Oct. 1 for two days a week. Those who attend schools of all high-needs students will be able to return for four days a week on Oct. 12. The rest of the district’s 11,000 special-education students must wait to learn whether they will be able to receive more than two days of weekly in-person school until after the district accommodates all other students wanting to learn in-person.

Karina Paulino-Pena, whose son has Down syndrome and attends Blackstone Elementary School, said last spring he struggled to sit still in front of a computer for more than 15 minutes and couldn’t concentrate or respond to the teacher’s questions.

“Of three therapies that he has to do for 30 minutes every week, he only managed to do one,” she said in Spanish in a statement. “I did

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Florida Changing Rules To Allow Philosophy Majors To Teach Social Sciences In Public School

To be, or not to be – a teacher?

Florida is changing its state rules to allow philosophy majors – for decades the targets of ruthless jokes about the usefulness of their college degrees – to teach social sciences in public schools.

Philosophy majors have included Supreme Court Justice David Souter and former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina.

The change is long overdue, said experts in the field. They describe misconceptions by critics who fail to understand that philosophy majors consider questions more broadly and creatively.

“They imagine people sitting on mountains and uttering cryptic sayings or something,” said Gene Witmer, undergraduate coordinator for philosophy students at the University of Florida.

The change expands the pool of teacher candidates for social science courses, which previously required a degree in social science, social studies, history, political science, geography, sociology, economics or psychology. It also means schools that teach philosophy can now hire

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Carolina named 3rd top public university in Wall Street Journal and Times Higher Education ranking

A new ranking out this week lists Carolina third among all public universities in the United States.

The 2021 Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education College Rankings also listed Carolina 33rd among all public and private universities in the nation. This is the second year in a row that Carolina has maintained those positions in this college ranking.

The rankings are based on 15 factors across four main categories including resources, engagement, outcomes and environment. Carolina scored its highest marks for student outcomes, which looked at graduation rates, reputation, value added to graduate salary and debt after graduation.

The Wall Street Journal and Times Higher Education ranking comes out the same week that U.S. News & World Report’s 2021 Best Colleges rankings listed Carolina fifth among public schools and first for best value schools among public universities in the United States.

“These rankings are a tribute to the faculty and

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