Proposition 208 still makes me queasy, but I’m supporting Invest in Ed

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Opinion: Two years ago, I opposed Invest in Education. Here’s why I’ve changed my mind.

Marisol Garcia, an eighth-grade social studies teacher in the Isaac School District and vice president of the Arizona Education Association, stands by boxes containing the 435,669 signatures for the InvestInEd ballot initiative that were turned in at the Arizona Secretary of State’s Office at the state Capitol in Phoenix on July 2, 2020. (Photo: David Wallace/The Republic)

Here, finally, is where the rubber meets the road for Arizona’s children.

Should we raise taxes to boost funding for public schools? Or is the state’s current investment in their (and our) future good enough?

Supporters of Proposition 208 will tell you that it’s time, finally, to Invest in Education.

As long as we can do it with someone else’s money.

Opponents of Proposition 208 will tell you that if voters raise taxes on the richest among

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Proposition 208 hurts education-funding cause in Arizona, not help it. Vote no on Invest in Ed

Starved for years, Arizona schools remain undernourished.

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The state has among the largest class sizes in the country, a nation-worst student-counselor ratio of more than 900 to 1, and districts short of nurses, librarians, aides and other support staff.

The crisis is most evident in the continued shortage of certified teachers in classrooms. A survey of schools document more than 1,700 positions that remain unfilled this year alone.

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Proposition 208 promises to change much of that, by imposing a 78% tax increase on individual income above $250,000 (and household income above $500,000). It raises the top marginal tax rate from 4.5% to 8%.

An architect of the plan says passage of the ballot measure would mean reduced class sizes, diminished teacher shortage and markedly improved student achievement.

We wish it were so.

Proposition

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Proposition 208 hurts education-funding cause in Arizona; no on Invest in Ed

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Opinion: Proposition 208 is an extreme proposal with more pitfalls than promise, that deepens the divisions in our society and puts the state’s economy at risk.

Education funding has, rightfully, dominated Arizona’s political and fiscal attention in recent years. But Proposition 208, the Invest in Education Act, goes way too far. (Photo: The Republic)

Starved for years, Arizona schools remain undernourished.

The state has among the largest class sizes in the country, a nation-worst student-counselor ratio of more than 900 to 1, and districts short of nurses, librarians, aides and other support staff.

The crisis is most evident in the continued shortage of certified teachers in classrooms. A survey of schools document more than 1,700 positions that remain unfilled this year alone.

Proposition 208 promises to change much of that, by imposing a 78% tax increase on individual income above $250,000 (and household income above $500,000). It raises the

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Pass Proposition EE to support early childhood education

Christina N. Taylor
Published 7:00 a.m. MT Oct. 7, 2020

I’m writing to urge Larimer County residents to consider a “yes” vote on Proposition EE, a statewide tobacco/vaping tax that will allow us to provide universal access to preschool for 4-year-olds in Colorado.

This measure will go a long way in closing the educational gap for our state’s preschoolers, and is an important first step in increasing educational access and equity for Colorado children.

Research continually demonstrates that early childhood education is one of the very best investments we can make for our children, with an estimated return on investment of $8.60 for every dollar spent.

It is important to note how much we’ve learned over the past few months about educational access in our community. As schools shut down in March due to COVID-19 restrictions, and families were forced to choose between working or

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Arizona ballot measure Proposition 208 leads in new poll

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The Invest in Education Act (Proposition 208), has support from nearly half of the voters surveyed, according to The Suffolk University/USA TODAY poll conducted Sept. 28-30. (Photo: Getty Images)

Proposition 208, which would raise taxes for education spending in Arizona, has a solid lead among likely voters, according to a new poll.

The Suffolk University/USA TODAY Network poll found that the Invest in Education Act, which would add a 3.5% tax surcharge on the wealthiest earners in the state, has support from nearly half of the voters surveyed.

Among the likely voters polled, 47% said they supported the measure, 37% opposed and 15% were undecided. The support largely falls along party lines, with more Democrats supporting the measure than Republicans. Independents were evenly split.

The live-interview poll of 500 likely voters in Arizona was conducted between Saturday and Wednesday and has a margin of error of 4.4 percentage points.

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