Rep. Ben Cline weighs in on COVID-19, education, prior to election

ROANOKE, Va. (WDBJ) – Incumbent Ben Cline has been around politics for most of his adult life, beginning in 1994 when he began working for his predecessor, Bob Goodlatte.

But even with his time spent in our nation’s capital, he says Virginia will always be home.

“I grew up here in the Shenandoah Valley, met my wife here who grew up here, we have our twin daughters, we live in Botetourt County now,” said Republican Ben Cline, who’s running for reelection in the 6th Congressional District race.

Throughout the last two years, Cline says he’s pleased with what Congress has been able to accomplish, and wants to continue in his position, especially as we continue through the pandemic.

“Rapidly get the research into place, for a vaccine, and continuing, even today, trying to get, help passed through Congress for help for families, for small businesses, here in the 6th District,”

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‘Trying to jam a month’s worth of work into a week’ | Coons fears Barrett won’t be vetted properly prior to SCOTUS hearing | The Latest from WDEL News

“Look, Judge [Amy Coney] Barrett possesses qualifications that I think are appropriate and relevant for a nominee for the most significant court in our country,” Said Senator Chris Coons Wednesday. “My concern isn’t her qualifications. It’s her judicial philosophy and reviews, and the ways in which those will have real world consequences for millions of Americans.”

Right now, with everything going on in the world, Coons does not feel like it is the appropriate time to be choosing a candidate for the nation’s highest court. Confirmations should come following only careful consideration, and consideration takes a not insignificant amount of time. There is a body of work for congressional leaders to sort through to decide whether or not they can support a candidate for the office and that time has not been provided, Coons said.

“Frankly, we’re trying to jam a month’s worth of work into a week, and it

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Opinion | September jobs report shows U.S. economy missing more jobs now than it did at worst point of any prior postwar recession

Here’s the bad news: The nation’s payrolls are still down 10.7 million jobs, or about 7 percent, since their peak in February, when the recession began. That’s enormous. In fact, a higher net share of jobs is still “missing” today, relative to pre-recession times, than was the case even at the worst period of any prior postwar downturn.

The chart below shows percentage changes in employment since the recession began, and how recent trends compare with other postwar downturns and recoveries. The black line plots the Great Recession and its aftermath. At the very worst point for the job market in that business cycle, payrolls were down about 6.3 percent. Now, however, the magnitude of those Great Recession job losses looks slightly less “great” when compared with more recent changes in employment, plotted by the red line.

Another measure of labor market health, the unemployment rate, tells a barely more

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