Mall at Fairfield Commons works to educate people on children’s mental health

BEAVERCREEK, OH (WDTN) – The Mall at Fairfield Commons is supporting the On Our Sleeves movement, backed by the experts at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, to share important mental health resources with families and children.

On Our Sleeves is a movement to transform children’s mental health through education, advocacy and research, according to a spokesperson for the mall.

“Childhood mental health is an often overlooked and vastly underfunded component of pediatric health and research,” said Niki Shafer, Senior Vice President of Outreach, Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

Over the next several weeks, The Mall at Fairfield Commons, in conjunction with other Washington Prime Group town centers nationwide, will share weekly emails with resources and activities created by behavioral health experts at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

For more information on The Mall at Fairfield Commons, please visit mallatfairfieldcommons.com. To learn more about the On Our Sleeves movement, please visit onoursleeves.org.


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Young People Care About Elections, They Just Don’t Always Show Up to Vote. Here’s How Education Can Help.

It’s election season in the U.S., and get-out-the-vote efforts are in full swing. And one question being asked by pundits and politicos is, how can we motivate young voters to show up at the polls?

After all, in the most recent presidential election, less than half of citizens ages 18 to 29 participated, compared to 71 percent of those 65 and older and 67 percent of eligible voters ages 45 to 64..

But a book published earlier this year by two political scientists tweaks that question. Young people are already plenty motivated to vote, the authors say, but they don’t always follow through to cast ballots. So this book asks, what is it that prevents young people from actually voting?

The answer has implications for political campaigns, policymakers and of course for educators. The book, called “Making Young Voters,” offers a surprising insight about what kind of education actually influences

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Shades of Green: Local company helps people build symbiotic relationships with the land

Brandy Hall (Photos by Virginie Drujon Kipellen)

By Beth Ward

“I got a text from a client recently who has a three-year-old,” says Brandy Hall, ecological designer and managing director of Shades of Green Permaculture. “They were in the garden and found a bunny rabbit eating their strawberries. The three-year-old was sitting near the bunny, too, also eating the strawberries. And I just thought, ‘this the whole reason I do this. This is everything.’”

What Hall and her team at Shades of Green do in a general sense is install ecologically sustainable landscapes for clients as varied as Monday Night Brewing, Grady High School and a residential farming development in Costa Rica. They help build habitats for birds, bees and pollinators. They restore watersheds, rebuild depleted soil, create landscapes where native and edible plants can thrive. They install berry thickets and fruit trees, rain gardens, flowers that attract hummingbirds. They

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Young people ‘need higher PUP rate, jobs support package’

The Government must restore young people to the higher pandemic unemployment payment (PUP) rate or deliver a “massive” jobs support package for them in the budget, the National Youth Council of Ireland (NYCI) has said.

The measures are needed to address the 36.5 per cent youth unemployment rate, it said.

Almost a third of young people under 25 are now on the lowest rate of the PUP (€203) compared to a fifth of recipients over 25, according to analysis undertaken by the NYCI of data provided by the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection.

Overall, almost six out of 10 young people under 25 are on the two lower rates of €203 and €250. Almost two-thirds of older workers are on the highest rate of €300.

James Doorley, deputy director of the NYCI, said it is calling on the Government to either “restore all those who lost their job

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Local nonprofit hopes to educate people on human trafficking, raise awareness

JONESBORO, Ark. (KAIT) – Human trafficking is a very real and scary thing, but what you need to be looking out for may not be what you think.



a screen shot of an open laptop computer sitting on top of a table: Human trafficking is a very real and scary thing, but what you need to be looking out for may not be what you think.


© Provided by Jonesboro KAIT
Human trafficking is a very real and scary thing, but what you need to be looking out for may not be what you think.

Hope Found of Northeast Arkansas is working hard to raise awareness of the dangers of human trafficking, while also advising the signs don’t always look like we expect.

One of the biggest hurdles in educating others on trafficking is debunking the rumors that often overwhelm the fight to stop trafficking.

Co-founder of Hope Found Megan Brown says while it’s important to be aware of your surroundings and be vigilant, properly educating yourself on sex trafficking is the best way to protect yourself and others.

Typically, social media posts about vehicles being tagged, suspicious

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People in Business: Bruce Dixon named chief executive officer of the Tech Foundry

Springfield – The Tech Foundry, a nonprofit whose mission it is to support the region’s growing need for a qualified technology workforce and elevate underrepresented groups into sustainable careers in information technology, has named Bruce Dixon as their new chief executive officer. Dixon will work alongside an 11-member board, lead a five-member staff, and drive strategic business partnerships and curriculum development to propel the already thriving organization forward.

Founded in 2014, the Tech Foundry has offered internships, networking opportunities and instruction to traditionally low-income, underserved populations, preparing graduates for entry-level IT workforce in the Pioneer Valley. These programs are offered free of charge to participants through generous donations from area businesses and members of the local community.

Dixon previously served as the chief executive officer of the Connecticut Pre-Engineering Program, a social venture that inspires and prepares underrepresented students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. It’s this

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Police cited four at Saturday party with more than 100 people in Eugene

Jordyn Brown
 
| Register-Guard

The Eugene and University of Oregon police departments cited four people Saturday night for throwing a large party off-campus that had between 100 and 150 people, many who were college-age.

This comes as Lane County Public Health officials continue pleading with the community to stop gatherings — in particular, college parties — that have led to multiple COVID-19 outbreaks. The Eugene Police Department and the University of Oregon Police Department will continue doing weekend “party patrols” to disperse rowdy gatherings like Saturday’s, and to remind people why they’re a bad idea right now. 

More: Officials call for end to college parties as Lane County reports record 58 new COVID-19 cases

On Tuesday, Lane County had reached 1,570 total cases, with 262 infectious people, meaning they are within 10 days of their symptom onset. These people are considered by officials as capable of passing on the virus.

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Wateraid Study Reveals The UK’s Young People Are Still Misinformed About Periods

If you grew up in the early noughties and your sex education was anything like mine, your period was the impeding boogie man coming to get everyone. Adverts told you that you’d use a pad covered in miscellaneous blue liquid to deal with it and teachers informed you it was something to be dealt with quietly and secretly. Oct. 10 marks the first National Period Day in the UK, a step towards destigmatising menstruation once and for all. And it clearly can’t come soon enough as a recent study found nearly a quarter of people didn’t know what was happening when their period first started. Clean water charity Wateraid has found that there’s still a stigma attached to periods and unearthed some disturbing statistics about period poverty in the UK, too.

Wateraid spoke to 1,000 people between the ages of 14 and 21 living in the UK. They found that

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Skills Connect to retrain people who have lost jobs

A new initiative is being launched today aimed at retraining individuals who have lost their jobs as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. 

Details of the Skills Connect programme are to be announced by the Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science, Simon Harris. 

It is hoped the initiative will assist up to 2,000 people by the end of the year and will be aimed in particular at people in the hospitality, retail and tourism trade who are unemployed. 

The Irish Hotels’ Federation estimates that 100,000 people have lost their jobs across the industry already, but it is hoped that some of the job losses will be temporary. 

The Federation says tens of thousands more jobs are at risk as Level 3 restrictions come into effect across the country today for the next three weeks. 

The Skills Connect programme will give participants the chance to reskill and

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My Reflection Matters supports Connecticut home-schoolers in raising ‘free people’ outside the system

Many parents are homeschooling their children due to the pandemic, but Chemay Morales-James beat them to it. She has been home-schooling for years, not due to coronavirus, but due to another seemingly incurable pandemic: racism. And she’s not alone.



a man sitting on top of a wooden fence: Chemay Morales-James points to a fish approaching her son, Judah James', 8, while Holly Dixon holds her son, Isaiah, 1, to look into the pond as the My Reflection Matters Village meets for a day of fishing and hiking at Southford Falls State Park Sept. 30. My Reflection Matters Village is a co-op of Connecticut parents of children of color who are home-schooling their children, using materials and processes that are more affirming to their children.


© Kassi Jackson/Kassi Jackson/Hartford Courant/TNS
Chemay Morales-James points to a fish approaching her son, Judah James’, 8, while Holly Dixon holds her son, Isaiah, 1, to look into the pond as the My Reflection Matters Village meets for a day of fishing and hiking at Southford Falls State Park Sept. 30. My Reflection Matters Village is a co-op of Connecticut parents of children of color who are home-schooling their children, using materials and processes that are more affirming to their children.

“Parents are deciding that the way school is designed doesn’t work for most kids, especially kids of color. They are not hearing the true history of who they are, the

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