Pressure grows on Pearson over pay row, while sales steady

PEARSON reported some improvement in sales today, but a row over executive pay and an impending management shake-up continue to dog the company.

The education publisher saw overall sales tumble 14% in the nine months to September, but global online sales also grew 14%.

Sales in the third quarter fell 10%, an improvement on the 28% fall in the second quarter.

John Fallow, the chief executive to be replaced by Andy Bird next week, said: “Our digital performance is very strong, as we support customers and learners around the world as they shift to fully online and hybrid learning. This has been a challenging transformation for all of us but we are starting to see the benefit of all our work to ensure Pearson becomes the winner in digital learning.”


A third of shareholders have voted against the pay deal offered to Bird, a former Disney executive. He could qualify

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Board of Education approves 2020-21 pay increase for eligible OKCPS certified, support staff

Oklahoma City Public Schools announced Monday that the board of education approved of a 2020-21 pay increase for eligible OKCPS certified and support staff.



a close up of a sign: FILE: OKCPS school bus


© KOCO 5
FILE: OKCPS school bus

The decision comes after negotiation meetings between district leaders and the Oklahoma City AFT Local 2309 of the American Federation of Teachers AFL-CIO of Oklahoma City. The pay increase will be for eligible certified staff, which a news release states is made up of teachers, nurses, counselors, speech and language pathologists, psychologists and library media specialists.

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The salary changes will include a step increase and an investment in teacher salary schedule reforms. Those reforms include an enrichment of step 0 of $500 (from $41,000 to $41,500) and step 25 (from $61,135 to $61,735).

Additional terms related to teacher transfers, assignments and evaluations also were revised Monday.

The OKCPS Board of Education also

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The Foolproof Way to Pay for Your Kids’ Education

There are few more exciting (or expensive) moments for parents than watching their children enter post-secondary education.  And for many Canadians, there’s no greater way to prepare for that milestone than by investing in a Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP), a long-term savings model to store funds for schooling tax-free.

No matter the size of your contributions, a mature RESP can be part of a strong financial plan for aspiring students, helping them handle tuition fees and other assorted campus costs while working towards their degrees and certificates. The government is also standing by to put some money in the pot to incentivize your investment, so starting an RESP is extra beneficial for your kids.

In partnership with Fidelity Investments, we asked one Canadian family how RESPs supported their children’s school plans, not to mention cut down the costs of higher education.

A guaranteed, tax-free investment

You can start up

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Teachers Find Higher Pay and Growing Options in Covid Pods

Krissy Rand has more than a decade of experience teaching special education to elementary school students, most recently in the Salem, Mass., public school district. She calls last spring’s remote teaching a nightmare, and was disheartened to learn about her school’s Covid-19 fall guidelines. With no library or gym time, “you’re basically a prisoner in your classroom,” she says.

The 39-year-old Ms. Rand put out her résumé. Eight groups of families contacted her within three days. She now makes more money teaching six first-graders from six families in Wellesley, Mass. They are following their public school’s curriculum, and she’s added cooking, yoga and earth sciences, with lots of hands-on experiments. She loves that there are no rules and administrative red tape, and no sitting through long meetings.

“It’s a teacher’s dream,” she says. “The day flies by.”

Long underpaid and underappreciated, teachers are finding more career options as demand for

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Pearson overcomes investor ire to hire new CEO with big pay packet

By Kate Holton

LONDON (Reuters) – Shareholders in educational publisher Pearson <PSON.L> sanctioned the appointment of former Disney executive Andy Bird as CEO on Friday, accepting the need for a multimillion-pound pay packet to secure his services.

The British company had to get the backing of shareholders to offer Bird a co-investment opportunity worth up to $9.3 million, a move it said was necessary to secure a “rare” talent whose experience fitted with Pearson’s requirements.

Of votes cast, 67% backed the move and Bird will take over as chief executive on Oct. 19.

“During this process, we have undertaken extensive engagement with our shareholders, in which Andy has been recognised as an outstanding candidate,” Sidney Taurel, Chair of Pearson, said.

Although Bird does not have direct experience in education, he has been on Pearson’s board since May and helped develop Disney’s direct-to-consumer strategy.

Pearson has endured a tumultuous four years

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UPDATE 2-Pearson overcomes investor ire to hire new CEO with big pay packet

* 67% of votes cast back new CEO deal

* Approval needed for Bird to start on Oct 19 (Adds company comment)

LONDON, Sept 18 (Reuters) – Shareholders in educational publisher Pearson sanctioned the appointment of former Disney executive Andy Bird as CEO on Friday, accepting the need for a multimillion-pound pay packet to secure his services.

The British company had to get the backing of shareholders to offer Bird a co-investment opportunity worth up to $9.3 million, a move it said was necessary to secure a “rare” talent whose experience fitted with Pearson’s requirements.

Of votes cast, 67% backed the move and Bird will take over as chief executive on Oct. 19.

“During this process, we have undertaken extensive engagement with our shareholders, in which Andy has been recognised as an outstanding candidate,” Sidney Taurel, Chair of Pearson, said.

Although Bird does not have direct experience in education, he

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