Oregon Department of Corrections considers cutting ties with community colleges

The Oregon Department of Corrections is considering cutting ties with community colleges across the state and proposing to move its education program in-house to address a budget shortfall.

The DOC currently contracts with six community colleges in Oregon to provide high school diploma equivalency testing, or GED services, to inmates across its 14 facilities.

“DOC is proposing that those contracts be phased out and the agency hire back those positions as part of the DOC permanent budget going forward,” DOC communications manager Jennifer Black told OPB.

She said nearly 1,000 inmates were enrolled in the Adult Basic Skill Development program as of Sept. 30.

Black said, historically, DOC had identified “barriers” in contracting with the colleges for its Adult Basic Skills, or ABS, program including “consistency of services and oversight.”

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, contractors were unable to enter the institutions and ABS programming could not be adapted and continued

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Nearly 1 in 3 Oregon students learning in-person attend private schools, election 2020 preview: The week in education

An Oregonian/OregonLive analysis of state education data found that 30% of students who attended in-person classes the week of Sept. 28-Oct. 2 are enrolled in private schools.

All told, 550 Oregon schools offered some form of in-person instruction that week, teaching some 46,000 students. One hundred and seventy of those schools are private and taught 13,000 students in-person, state Department of Education figures show.

That means 6% of the state’s 560,000 K-12 students visited a classroom last week. The share of private students in the overall population is about 2%.

In order for school districts to allow in-person instruction, the county they’re in must meet specific coronavirus set by the state. If a district or school draws 10% or more of its workforce or enrollment from more than one county, both must meet the metrics in order for the district to open its classrooms.

That’s the case in Portland Public

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Oregon Department of Corrections weighs cutting ties with community colleges, moving education in-house

The Oregon Department of Corrections is weighing ending its connections to community colleges across the state and proposing to move its education program in-house because of a budget shortfall.

The DOC currently contracts with six community colleges in Oregon to provide high school diploma equivalency services to inmates across its 14 facilities.

Department of Corrections communications manager Jennifer Black told Oregon Public Broadcasting that DOC is proposing the contracts be phased out and the agency hire back those positions as part of the DOC permanent budget going forward.

She said nearly 1,000 inmates were enrolled in the Adult Basic Skill Development program as of Sept. 30.

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, contractors were unable to enter the institutions and ABS (Adult Basic Skills) programming could not be adapted and continued during operation modifications,” she said. “Converting contractor funding to DOC staff positions will allow the department to continue ABS programming during

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Oregon District Offers Online Learning After Wildfire Postpones School : NPR

A sign for a recent graduate is bent but not burned in Blue River, Ore., eight days after the Holiday Farm Fire swept through its business district.

Pool photo by Andy Nelson/The Register-Guard


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Pool photo by Andy Nelson/The Register-Guard

A sign for a recent graduate is bent but not burned in Blue River, Ore., eight days after the Holiday Farm Fire swept through its business district.

Pool photo by Andy Nelson/The Register-Guard

Some rural school districts in Oregon are starting online learning this week after it was postponed twice by the worst wildfires on record. But the road to recovery is only just beginning.

Since many wildfires are still burning, Oregon Department of Education (ODE) Chief of Staff Cindy Hunt said they have not formally asked school districts to provide data on their condition. But the ODE has heard from roughly 14 school districts who have

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Oregon District Offers Online Learning After Wildfires Postpone School : NPR

An Oregon school district hit by wildfires scrambles to create some normalcy and hold classes online. It’s unclear how many families can participate since many of them have been displaced.



ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Some rural school districts in Oregon are starting online learning this week after it was postponed twice by the worst wildfires on record. But as Elizabeth Gabriel with member station KLCC reports, the school district’s road to recovery is only just beginning.

ELIZABETH GABRIEL, BYLINE: The small, rural community of Blue River is one of the hardest hit by one of the biggest wildfires in Oregon this summer. About a thousand people live in the town a couple hours east of Eugene. The fast-moving Holiday Farm Fire destroyed more than 400 homes in the area. But the start of online classes means students are finally gaining some normalcy.

COREY CHRISTENSEN: Hi, Brice.

BRICE: Hi.

CHRISTENSEN: It’s so

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Deaf students in Oregon adapting to online learning

This fall start was different not only because of distance learning, but also because of the wildfires. Students are learning online, scattered over 20 counties.

SALEM, Ore — Distance learning has been a challenge for students all over and it’s no exception for kids who are deaf or hard of hearing.

We checked in with the Oregon School for the Deaf to see how they’re dealing with online learning in their second official week of school. The director of the school, Sharla Jones, said she and her staff are coping the best they can.

“Our staff are scattered around 10 counties and our students cover 20 counties,” said Jones.

Last week was the first week of school for the 120 students who attend. This fall start was different not only because of distance learning, but also because of the wildfires. Jones said there are a handful of students who are

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Oregon Department of Education bans Confederate flags from school grounds

The Confederate flag is the latest emblem to be designated as a hate symbol by Oregon’s state education board this week.



a close up of a flag


© Provided by Washington Examiner


The move is part of a policy crafted by the Oregon Department of Education dubbed “All Students Belong,” which also prohibits nooses and swastikas.

Effective immediately, the policy change requires Oregon school districts to craft standards in compliance with it by New Year’s Day. ODE officials released a statement saying a comprehensive version of the policy will come out in the coming months.

ODE Director Colt Gill said that the decision lives up to state educators’ responsibility to ensure all students feel safe and welcome.

“The noose, Confederate flag and swastika are being used to bully and harm students and staff, and this is particularly true for students of color,” Gill said. “Students must feel like they are safe and belong in

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Oregon Department of Education issues ban on hate symbols in public schools

The Oregon Department of Education issued a temporary ban on hate symbols — including the Confederate flag, swastikas and nooses — in public school classrooms in the state, officials said.

The “All Students Belong” rule was adopted unanimously by the state Board of Education on Thursday. Colt Gill, the director of the Department of Education, said the move came as a response to student calls for a ban.

“Our students called us out and into action,” Gill said in a statement. “The Oregon Department of Education is committed to ensuring that Oregon’s schools are safe and inclusive for all students and staff, and the All Students Belong rule is an important step in that process.”

The rule, which took effect immediately, requires school districts to implement policies by Jan. 1 that prohibit the hate symbols, except as part of the teaching curriculum. Officials said that many districts already had similar

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