Call for making sports medicine part of health education – Newspaper

ABBOTTABAD: Sports medicine is a specialised field that should be made part of health education in Pakistan, said renowned consultant of sports medicine, Dr Zafar Iqbal, while addressing an interactive session titled “can sports medicine really make a difference to an athlete’s performance and improve the health of the nation” here on Friday.

The session was organised in collaboration with the Department of Medical Education of Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad, here on Friday. A number of orthopaedic surgeons, general surgeons and representatives of sports organisations attended the seminar.

Associate dean and co-coordinator Dr Noaman Siddique briefed the participants about objectives of the event while Prof Umer Farooq, dean of Ayub Medical College, presided over the closing session.

Keynote speaker Dr Zafar Iqbal said in his presentation that due to specialised role of sports medicine the playing life of every sportsman could be increased with less chances of injuries which otherwise

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After 40 years in medicine, here’s what a Maine addiction expert has learned about alcohol, opioids and public health

When The New York Times, the Washington Post and news agencies across Maine have needed to understand the opioid epidemic and the policies emerging in response to it, they have often turned to a specialist in addiction medicine working in Portland, Dr. Mark Publicker. Unafraid to criticize redundant task forces and barriers to treatment, his advocacy led to better policy and saved lives, said those who learned of his impending retirement online.

As the pandemic complicates the more hidden challenge of addiction, Publicker, 70, will retire from his private practice at the end of the year, after 40 years in medicine. He recently spoke about his career and the changing upheavals of the opioid crisis. Today, synthetic opioids, including fentanyl, are the most common drugs involved in drug overdose deaths in the United States.

Dr. Mark Publicker will retire from his private practice in Portland at the end of the
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Marshall School of Medicine announces community partners for new ‘Blessing Box’ Program | News

HUNTINGTON — The Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine has launched a blessing box program, through which it will partner with local organizations throughout southern West Virginia to help meet basic needs.

“A key component of health, well-being and long-term recovery is food security,” said Tina Ramirez, director of the Great Rivers Regional System for Addiction Care, who is administering the program. “The ‘take what you need, leave what you can’ philosophy behind blessing boxes meets an immediate need and will therefore be a blessing to both the donor and the recipient.”

The Community Blessing Box Program is funded through a grant from the Pallottine Foundation of Huntington. In addition to nonperishable food items, basic toiletries and baby supplies, such as wipes or diapers, are accepted at all blessing box locations. The project mirrors the model developed by Community Connections Inc., which partners with donors to supply blessing

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The best medicine for a COVID-19 economy? More education and training

Reading the tea leaves of a U.S. economy reshaped by COVID-19 has sent economic analysts and prognosticators into overdrive. Many see a move away from big cities and into simpler, socially distanced life in small towns. If this happens at scale, it could be a boon to heretofore “left-behind” places in the Midwest and other regions.

Others predict significant drops in demand for jobs with low education and training requirements, driven by automation and the growth of technology needed to operate socially distanced offices, warehouses, manufacturing facilities and even restaurants. A recently released analysis by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia lends support to this idea.

Policymakers can adopt policies to help improve wages and opportunities in jobs with fewer credentialing requirements, for example by helping smaller manufacturers and boosting the minimum wage. But policy also needs to directly address the need for more workers with higher skills due both

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OU college of medicine plans mobile classroom to promote diversity in health professions

OKLAHOMA CITY — A large RV, customized as a health education classroom on wheels, is among the new projects the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine plans with a $2.8 million grant from the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration.

The grant is a one-year supplement that augments an initial $4.7 million award to the OU College of Medicine last year. The aim of the grant is to recruit, retain and admit students from rural, tribal and medically underserved areas, and to expand the primary care experience among current medical students. Data shows that students from those groups who attend medical school and residency in Oklahoma are more likely to return to their communities to practice medicine.

“Of Oklahoma’s 77 counties, 76 have a shortage of primary care physicians, and the need is particularly great in rural areas, underserved communities and tribes. The ultimate goal of this grant is to

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