Covid: Wales’ lockdown IT praised but learning hours low

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A £3m scheme provided laptops to pupils who did not have their own

Wales did well in making sure the poorest pupils had laptops during lockdown but home learning hours were amongst the lowest in the UK, a new study has found.

Education Policy Institute analysis concluded support for children with additional learning needs was insufficient in all parts of the UK.

Disadvantaged pupils lost out most where there were delays and poor decisions, the report said.

Schools reopened fully last month.

But some pupils are having to learn at home again while they self-isolate due to coronavirus cases in their schools.

  • Laptops and 4G internet offered to school pupils
  • Plea to end remote teaching ‘postcode lottery’

The Nuffield Foundation-funded study compared the support for education across Wales, Scotland, England and Northern Ireland during the height of the pandemic.

Schools in Wales closed in

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‘We are achieving herd immunity right now’: Professor argues against lockdown measures

7 October 2020, 18:21

There is no longer a rationale for lockdown restrictions as the UK is “achieving herd immunity”, a university professor has told LBC.

Dr Gabriela Gomes, a professor of mathematic and statistics at the University of Strathclyde, made her case against lockdown measures to LBC’s Tom Swarbrick.

The professor is one of thousands of scientists and medical experts to have signed a letter calling for the end of lockdown restrictions and a return to a herd immunity strategy.

The ‘anti lockdown petition’ as it has been called, has been signed by at least 50,000 members of the public, 2,500 scientists and 3,200 medical practitioners so far.

It calls for those who are less vulnerable to the effects of Covid-19 to be allowed to return to normal life, with a herd immunity approach to tackling the Covid-19 pandemic while protecting the most vulnerable.

Dr Gomes told LBC: “Since

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Special education during lockdown – SUNSTAR

Learners with special education needs require face-to-face instruction but are vulnerable to the coronavirus disease. Parents and teachers have no choice but to make distance learning work.

AS THE clock ticked closer to 10 a.m., Elena Elpedez cleared the dining table to make way for her son’s online class simulation. Ten-year-old Enzo, who has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD, has the entire makeshift study area for himself for a good hour. Excited, Enzo set up his Zoom account to meet up with his classmates and teachers, albeit virtually.

Despite the difficulties of distance learning amid the coronavirus pandemic, Elena did not think twice about enrolling her bunso (youngest child) this school year for special education or Sped at Parang Elementary School in Marikina. It was better, she said, than letting months pass without Enzo learning anything.

Elena left her business process outsourcing job in 2015, as soon as she

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For kids in special education, lockdown learning a must

As the clock ticked closer to 10 a.m., Elena Elpedez cleared the dining table to make way for her son’s online class simulation. Ten-year-old Enzo, who has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD, has the entire makeshift study area for himself for a good hour. Excited, Enzo set up his Zoom account to meet up with his classmates and teachers, albeit virtually.

Despite the difficulties of distance learning amid the coronavirus pandemic, Elena did not think twice about enrolling her bunso (youngest child) this school year for special education or SPED at Parang Elementary School in Marikina. It was better, she said, than letting months pass without Enzo learning anything.

Elena left her business process outsourcing job in 2015, as soon as she realized the need to supervise Enzo’s schooling and therapy. She then put up a printing business at their house to augment her income. During the lockdown, Elena

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Dreamscape Education And Defense Business Surges In Lockdown

Last week, Dreamscape Immersive announced the creation of Dreamscape Learn, an VR education platform now in development with Arizona State University. Over one hundred fifty designers, coders, and educators will work collaboratively to create immersive learning curricula on the Tempe campus. The first course, an entirely immersive approach to introductory biology, takes place inside of Dreamscape’s signature VR adventure Alien Zoo, which will serve as a virtual laboratory for students to explore, observe and solve problems. Michael Crow, President of ASU, said “Dreamscape Learn will take education into the 21st Century, where students become scientists working within pods in an Alien Zoo to study evolutionary biology.” 

Dreamscape Learn is expected to be available to students in 2021 with rapid expansion into other subjects by 2022. “Education is not a new direction for us. They’re in the founding DNA of the company,” said Parkes, “This is what Artamin, our Swiss

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despite lockdown difficulties, parents should persevere

Bilingualism can result in changes in the brains of children, potentially offering increased problem-solving skills. Pupils who are competent in two or more languages may have academic advantages over monolingual children.

In Wales, children have the opportunity to become bilingual by attending Welsh-medium primary and secondary schools, where the sole or main language of instruction is Welsh.

However, parents who do not speak Welsh but send their children to be educated in the language have reported finding home schooling challenging during the lockdown. Some may even be considering moving their children to English schools in order to be better able to support them at home – perhaps because of fears of future lockdowns or quarantines.

Nevertheless, where they can, parents should keep the faith. The benefits of a bilingual education are huge, and turning their backs on Welsh-medium education might be detrimental to increasing the number of young Welsh speakers.

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Coronavirus India lockdown Day 179 | Punjab to open higher education institutions from September 21

India has overtaken the U.S. and become the top country in terms of global COVID-19 recoveries, said the Union Health Ministry on Saturday, adding that the country has reported the highest number of total recoveries, with more than 42 lakh (42,08,431) COVID-19 patients having recovered.

Of the new recovered cases, about 60% are being reported from five States — Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Uttar Pradesh.

You can track coronavirus cases, deaths and testing rates at the national and State levels here. A list of State Helpline numbers is available as well.

Here are the latest updates:

10.00 am | New Delhi

DMRC sells over 80K smart cards

With the discontinuation of tokens in the Delhi Metro as part of precautionary measures to curb the spread of COVID-19, the Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) has sold around 8,500 smart cards per day between September 7 and 16.

Under

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