Adult education opportunities in Georgia eyed by state lawmakers | News

Georgia lawmakers are looking at ways to boost the number of people who earn high school and college degrees amid a changing labor market that is tending toward more automated technical jobs.

More than 1 million Georgians could become “unemployable” in the coming years due to a shift toward technology-driven jobs that people with lower levels of education cannot fill, according to Stephen Pruitt, president of the nonprofit Southern Regional Education Board.

Without access to adult education, those less-educated Georgians could be left in the lurch by 2030, particularly as the COVID-19 pandemic has sped up automated and online-focused jobs, Pruitt told a Georgia Senate study committee Thursday.

“The reality is we’re going to have plenty of jobs,” Pruitt said. “The question is whether we’re going to have people to take those jobs.”

The Senate Educating Adult Students Study Committee met for the first and perhaps only time Thursday to

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Adult education opportunities in Georgia eyed by state lawmakers – News – Athens Banner-Herald

ATLANTA — Georgia lawmakers are looking at ways to boost the number of people who earn high-school and college degrees amid a changing labor market that is tending toward more automated technical jobs.

More than 1 million Georgians could become “unemployable” in the coming years due to a shift toward technology-driven jobs that people with lower levels of education cannot fill, according to Stephen Pruitt, president of the nonprofit Southern Regional Education Board.

Without access to adult education, those less-educated Georgians could be left in the lurch by 2030, particularly as the COVID-19 pandemic has sped up automated and online-focused jobs, Pruitt told a Georgia Senate study committee Thursday.

“The reality is we’re going to have plenty of jobs,” Pruitt said. “The question is whether we’re going to have people to take those jobs.”

The Senate Educating Adult Students Study Committee met for the first and perhaps only time Thursday

Read More

Adult education opportunities in Georgia eyed by state lawmakers – News – Savannah Morning News

ATLANTA — Georgia lawmakers are looking at ways to boost the number of people who earn high-school and college degrees amid a changing labor market that is tending toward more automated technical jobs.

More than 1 million Georgians could become “unemployable” in the coming years due to a shift toward technology-driven jobs that people with lower levels of education cannot fill, according to Stephen Pruitt, president of the nonprofit Southern Regional Education Board.

Without access to adult education, those less-educated Georgians could be left in the lurch by 2030, particularly as the COVID-19 pandemic has sped up automated and online-focused jobs, Pruitt told a Georgia Senate study committee Thursday.

“The reality is we’re going to have plenty of jobs,” Pruitt said. “The question is whether we’re going to have people to take those jobs.”

The Senate Educating Adult Students Study Committee met for the first and perhaps only time Thursday

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Black lawmakers seek to revamp social studies education in Illinois

SPRINGFIELD — Leaders of the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus are urging a complete overhaul of the state’s social studies curriculum to ensure that contributions of Black Americans and other minorities are properly included in history education.

“Something has to happen in this space, where we’re all learning about each other, all of us,” Sen. Kimberly Lightford, a Maywood Democrat, said during a virtual committee hearing. “I’m not saying that we have to teach a special chapter that just teaches Black history. That is a myth. It should be taught throughout.”

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

Tuesday’s joint meeting of the Senate Education and Higher Education committees focused on racial equity in education and workforce development, one of four “pillars” that make up the caucus’s legislative agenda for the upcoming fall veto session.

During that hearing, lawmakers heard from several education officials, including Maurice Swinney, chief equity officer for Chicago Public Schools. CPS is currently in

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Pennsylvania lawmakers divided over proposal to provide families $1,000 per child for education expenses

Education in Pennsylvania remains a hot button topic, and as a state Senate committee heard testimony Monday on a bill that would give families stimulus funding for educational-related expenses, one lawmaker called for a truce.



a small child sitting on a table


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That was state Sen. Andy Dinniman’s hope when the Senate Education Committee’s hearing started. The panel heard from both proponents and opponents of Senate Bill 1230, which would give families $1,000 per child for educational purposes. The money could be used by parents to buy a computer for their kids’ remote learning, pay for tutoring or even cover private school tuition bills.

“Whether you like this bill or you don’t like this bill, what is happening in our schools is a problem,” said Dinniman, the West Chester Democrat and minority chair on the committee. “We have to come together to solve this problem, and we have to stop the

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What Texas lawmakers are saying about Trump’s COVID diagnosis

WASHINGTON — Texans were sending out prayers and jeers in equal measure after President Donald Trump announced he and First Lady Melania Trump had tested positive for COVID-19.



a man and a woman holding a sign: An artist from Gurukul art school paints a poster carrying a message for U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania in Mumbai, India, Friday, Oct. 2, 2020. President Trump said early Friday that he and first lady Melania have tested positive for the coronavirus, a stunning announcement that plunges the country deeper into uncertainty just a month before the presidential election. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)


© Rajanish Kakade, STF / Associated Press

An artist from Gurukul art school paints a poster carrying a message for U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania in Mumbai, India, Friday, Oct. 2, 2020. President Trump said early Friday that he and first lady Melania have tested positive for the coronavirus, a stunning announcement that plunges the country deeper into uncertainty just a month before the presidential election. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)


“I hope this is a wake up call that this virus is not a hoax or something cured by injecting bleach,” Julián Castro, the former San Antonio mayor and U.S. Housing and Urban Development secretary, tweeted after wishing the president well. “We need a plan, not the same divisive, dangerous

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Pennsylvania lawmakers pose TOPLESS for campaign to educate voters on new mail-in ballot rule

A trio of female lawmakers from Pennsylvania have posed topless for a new get-out-the-vote campaign which aims to educate voters on new mail-in ballot rules that were announced in the state for the upcoming election. 

Allegheny County council members Bethany Hallam, 30, and Liv Bennett, 42, and House candidate Emily Kinkead, 33, all went nearly nude for the attention-grabbing campaign, which warns voters not to forget to seal their mail-in ballots inside the provided secrecy envelope — or else they’ll be thrown out by election officials.

‘Desperate times call for desperate measures!’ Hallam tweeted last week. ‘So your favorite elected officials got naked so that you remember to make sure that your mail-in ballot is NOT submitted without its secrecy envelope!’

Vote! A trio of female lawmakers from Pennsylvania have posed topless for a new get-out-the-vote campaign which aims to educate voters on new mail-in ballot rules

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled that ballots not sealed inside the secrecy envelope can be rejected (pictured: Emily Kinkead, who is running for a state House seat in the 20th District)

The Pennsylvania Supreme

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Lawmakers, superintendents blindsided by Tennessee Education Department learning loss projections

Tennessee Department of Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn’s announcement of COVID-19-related learning loss projections for Tennessee students took state lawmakers and school superintendents by surprise.



a school bus parked in a parking lot


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In a joint news conference with Gov. Bill Lee last week, Schwinn announced Tennessee students are expected to face learning loss of 50% in English and 65 % in math, stressing the importance of in-person learning. Projections were based on national research and early results of beginning-of-year student checkpoint assessments in Tennessee.

“This press release really caught a lot of us off guard,” Henry County Schools Superintendent Leah Watkins told The Center Square. “I feel like this was a smack in the face of my educators, of my team, who have given up summer break to have had to change everything they do to make it work for a dual environment – virtual and in person. It just feels

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State of Texas: Lawmakers weigh ‘solutions’ proposed for education equity during pandemic

AUSTIN (Nexstar) – When Texas lawmakers return to the State Capitol for the upcoming legislative session in January, there will be many competing priorities – and education advocates hope equity in learning isn’t lost in the shuffle.

As part of a nationwide project called “Pandemic PASS or FAIL,” Texas lawmakers are now taking a closer look at solutions our team has discovered groups implementing across the state to combat learning challenges for students disproportionately impacted by the pandemic.

We spoke with Rep. Gina Hinojosa, a Democrat from Austin, where she previously served as school board president. Her ties to education still run deep, as she currently represents a district that includes the state’s largest college – the University of Texas at Austin.

“We know kids are losing valuable skills and knowledge,” Hinojosa said, describing difficulties with remote learning. She spoke of the need for remediation for students. “We need to

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Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn tells Tennessee lawmakers she’s ‘committed’ to working with them

NASHVILLE — Tennessee Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn told irate Republican members of the House Education Committee this week that she would work more closely with them going forward following a series of blow-ups that incensed hard-right GOP lawmakers.

“I am committed to that. I know the committee is committed to that,” Schwinn told Rep. Scott Cepicky, R-Culleoka, who raised issues including the uproar among conservatives over a proposed state child welfare wellness-check program during the pandemic that GOP members charged smacked of government intrusion into the home.

“I appreciate the feedback and the ongoing conversations, especially within the last several weeks,” Schwinn said. “I know we’ve come up with a number of really strong ideas about how to continue to strengthen that over the coming months.”

The exchange came amid a revolt by a number of conservative lawmakers, primarily in the House, with threats to hold a no-confidence vote on

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