Education Leader: Kansas schools must find better solution

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Kansas state education commissioner Randy Watson said schools will need to rethink the way they deliver education amid the coronavirus pandemic because what is happening now is “not sustainable.”

The Topeka Capital-Journal reports that Watson told members of the Kansas Association of School Boards on Friday that one of the best solutions is to return students for five-day-a-week learning, while keeping class sizes to fewer than 15 students while requiring masks and social distancing.

Watson said schools may need to partner with other organizations in the community, like churches or businesses that are closed anyway because of the pandemic to get enough room to space out students.

Watson also suggested that schools look internally for backup and use non-teaching school staff — like librarians, paraeducators, substitute teachers, central office staff and reading specialists — to fill the ranks.

“Everyone is going to have to be a

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Netflix’s ‘Deaf U’ gives Kansas student quite an education

Renate Rose of Olathe demonstrates what she calls “deaf people problems.”

She can cuddle with her girlfriend or she can communicate through sign language. But they can’t do both at the same time the way a hearing couple could.

It’s one of many moments in the new Netflix docuseries “Deaf U” that present a scenario hearing viewers may never have contemplated. Still, the goal of the eight-episode series, according to model/actor/executive producer Nyle DiMarco, is to show similarities between deaf and hearing communities while also exploring differences within the deaf community.

“We go through the same things in life. We live, oftentimes, in parallel, and you’ll see that through this show,” he said through an American Sign Language interpreter during an August Netflix press event. “I think the hearing community often looks at deaf people and the deaf experience as monochromatic or a monolith, and that simply isn’t true. …

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Kansas schools must find better solution

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Kansas state education commissioner Randy Watson said schools will need to rethink the way they deliver education amid the coronavirus pandemic because what is happening now is “not sustainable.”

The Topeka Capital-Journal reports that Watson told members of the Kansas Association of School Boards on Friday that one of the best solutions is to return students for five-day-a-week learning, while keeping class sizes to fewer than 15 students while requiring masks and social distancing.

Watson said schools may need to partner with other organizations in the community, like churches or businesses that are closed anyway because of the pandemic to get enough room to space out students.

Watson also suggested that schools look internally for backup and use non-teaching school staff — like librarians, paraeducators, substitute teachers, central office staff and reading specialists — to fill the ranks.

“Everyone is going to have to be

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Kansas Education officials discuss health, education and COVID-19

TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) – State education leaders discussed the connection between health and education for the Shawnee County Health Rankings meeting.



a person standing in front of a building: Kansas Education officials, including USD 501 Superintendent Dr. Tiffany Anderson, met to discuss Health Rankings and Education for the state.


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Kansas Education officials, including USD 501 Superintendent Dr. Tiffany Anderson, met to discuss Health Rankings and Education for the state.

USD 501 Superintendent Dr. Tiffany Anderson, Kansas Commissioner of Education Randy Watson, alongside Lieutenant Governor Lynn Rogers discussed where the state of education is in the face of a pandemic.

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Along with how health care for parents and families are impacting the students.

“The challenge for school districts will be how do we bring students back to school, fully back to school, in our largest school districts and keep them safe,” said Watson. “By the time we get enough vaccines to spread throughout Kansas, we’ll probably going to be well into the spring if not through the rest of the school year.”

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For Kansas schools, challenge will be ensuring special education students aren’t left behind – News – The Topeka Capital-Journal

It’s one challenge to close any learning gaps for special education students, but in a pandemic, just measuring those gaps will be another obstacle for Kansas schools, two special education leaders told The Topeka Capital-Journal.

Bert Moore, director of special education and title services for the Kansas Department of Education, and Heith Peine, executive director of student support services for Wichita Public Schools, joined The Capital-Journal’s Teaching Topeka podcast to discuss how special education teachers across Kansas have adapted to teaching in a pandemic.

State Commissioner of Education Randy Watson on Tuesday told the Kansas State Board of Education that, after a tour of just a few western Kansas school districts, he was becoming increasingly concerned that certain student groups, including special education students, are showing signs of academic regression as schools adjust their operations for the pandemic. More than 76,000 students, or 14.7% of all Kansas students, receive special

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