Alumna Starts New Teaching Job but Leaves Behind Something Amazing in Arkansas


Maddie Stinson and an Arkansas Miss Amazing participant.
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Maddie Stinson and an Arkansas Miss Amazing participant.

Maddie Stinson graduated from the University of Arkansas in May and is now teaching fifth grade special education classes at Sky Ranch Elementary in Oklahoma City.

She left behind something amazing in Arkansas, though.

Miss Amazing is a non-profit organization that provides opportunities for girls and women with disabilities to build their confidence and self-esteem. Stinson brought it with her when she became a student at the U of A.

She had volunteered for the non-profit while attending high school in Belleville, Illinois.

“I instantly fell in love with it,” she said. “I started traveling to different states to participate in their events, and when I decided I was coming to the U of A, I knew I wanted to bring Miss Amazing with me.”

So, at age 17, Stinson became the Arkansas director and built the organization from

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National Tertiary Education Union concerned university course fee hike could lead to more job cuts at La Trobe University | Bendigo Advertiser

news, local-news, bendigo, university, tertiary, higher education, parliament, bill, fees, humanities

CHANGES to university course fees will disadvantage students and lead to more higher education redundancies, a regional union president says. The federal parliament last week passed a higher education bill, which was expected to more than double the cost of humanities degrees, and increase the cost of law and commerce courses. Degrees like nursing and engineering were expected to drop in cost under the changes. National Tertiary Education Union La Trobe branch president Virginia Mansell Lees said the increased costs to humanities degrees would disadvantage students who came from regional and low-socioeconomic backgrounds, as well as those who entered university later in life. Read more news: “It really just casts university education down in a way that is unnecessary,” she said. “This plan is really shortsighted. “We don’t want people to feel like they have been left behind because

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UCSB Professional, Continuing Education Courses Teach How to Stay Competitive in Pandemic Job Market | Business

The COVID-19 pandemic and its associated impacts have forced all of us to rethink our jobs and how we do them. Perhaps the most jarring effect for many is the uncertainty of employment, as the economy shifts in response to the “new normal,” and certain positions fall by the wayside, or change substantially.

A certain amount of agility is necessary to navigate these unsettling times, and UC Santa Barbara’s Professional and Continuing Education (PaCE) is here to help.

With a suite of online programs in a variety of fields — from accounting and finance to web development — PaCE (formerly UCSB Extension) can provide members of the campus and the surrounding community the relevant skills to compete in today’s job market.

“Upskilling is no longer optional,” said Sheetal Gavankar, PaCE’s director of academic programs. “We are past the days when one can go to school for four years, get a

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How to spot gender and education bias in a job advert

A job advert can reveal quite a lot about whether an employer holds any biased views. Photo: Getty
A job advert can reveal quite a lot about whether an employer holds any biased views. Photo: Getty

Job hunting is a challenging process. Not only is it time-consuming, it’s also tricky to determine whether a position is for you simply from the description alone. Sometimes, you’ll need to get to the interview stage before you can find out more about the employer and the workplace culture.

That being said, a job advert can give away more than an employer realises. And more specifically, it can reveal quite a lot about whether they hold any biased views — unconscious or otherwise — on gender, education, class and other characteristics. So how can you spot the red flags in a job advert?

Be wary of a long list of desired skills and expected experience

Of course, some jobs require specific skills or more experience than others. But an unreasonably long list

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Mass. colleges have shown ‘Patience of Job’ through pandemic, says state Sen. Anne Gobi of Spencer – News – telegram.com

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented colleges and universities with financial challenges that will likely extend for multiple years and may not be sustainable for all institutions, heads of public and private universities told state lawmakers Tuesday.

 

“We don’t view this as a one-year deal,” University of Massachusetts President Marty Meehan told the Higher Education Committee. “We view this as a two- to three- to four-year deal, and I will say Madam Chairman, there are universities and colleges in New England who won’t survive this. What we’re trying to do at UMass is make sure at the end of this crisis that we still have five UMass campuses that are all nationally ranked and that are successful.”

 

The committee, chaired by Sen. Anne Gobi and Rep. Jeff Roy, heard virtual testimony from state education officials, the Massachusetts Teachers Association, and heads of community colleges and private and public universities for an

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An Impossible Choice For Homeless Parents: A Job, Or Their Child’s Education

The closure of school buildings in response to the coronavirus has been disruptive and inconvenient for many families, but for those living in homeless shelters or hotel rooms — including roughly 1.5 million school-aged children — the shuttering of classrooms and cafeterias has been disastrous.

For Rachel, a 17-year-old sharing a hotel room in Cincinnati with her mother, the disaster has been academic. Her school gave her a laptop, but “hotel Wi-Fi is the worst,” she says. “Every three seconds [my teacher is] like, ‘Rachel, you’re glitching. Rachel, you’re not moving.'”

For Vanessa Shefer, the disaster has made her feel “defeated.” Since May, when the family home burned, she and her four children have stayed in a hotel, a campground and recently left rural New Hampshire to stay with extended family in St. Johnsbury, Vt. Her kids ask, “When are we going to have a home?” But Shefer says she

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Baldwinsville school board refuses to answer questions about super’s job search, contract extension

Baldwinsville, NY – The Baldwinsville school board is refusing to discuss the unusual announcement that the district’s superintendent is looking for a job just days after the board approved a three-year contract extension and a salary boost.

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Superintendent Matthew J. McDonald also has refused to discuss or answer questions about his decision to seek a new job days after signing the contract extension.

McDonald got a $15,860 pay raise under the new contract. His salary rose from $175,500 in the last contract to $191,360, a 9 percent increase, according to the district and the contract extension.

The extension also gave McDonald a retroactive pay increase for the year ending June 30, 2020, raising his salary to $185,606. His salary originally was $175,500 for the year ending June 30, 2020, district officials said.

Here are some of the questions Syracuse.com 5/8 The Post-Standard asked the board:

The announcement that

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5 sneaky lies we’re told about the job search

It’s no shock that our friends, mothers, colleagues, mentors and favorite authors give us different advice about the job search.

After all, everyone’s professional experiences are different, thanks to the unique circumstances, organizations, industries and individuals we’re tasked with navigating during our careers.

Still, for all the diverse approaches out there, there are some dangerous myths that pervade our common thinking about the job search and discourage professionals (especially women) from stretching their wings and reaching their full professional potential.

Here are five of those lies and why they’re unreliable, according to hiring professionals. 

1. You can never land a role you don’t have formal experience in

“One of the silliest myths about the job application process is that the candidate cannot get a job if he has no experience. Sure, you won’t get a top position anywhere, but junior positions are well within reach. As usual, it all depends

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Australian university trade union concedes up to 90,000 job losses

By its own admission, the National Tertiary Education Union (NTEU) is presiding over a disaster—the greatest ever destruction of jobs in the Australian university sector.

The October edition of the union’s aptly-titled Sentry online magazine states: “The NTEU can confirm that there have been at least 12,185 positions lost in Australian universities since March. This comprises at least 5,300 continuing positions, 6,486 casual positions and 399 fixed term positions that we are aware of. Sadly, the full figure is likely much higher.”

Based on the NTEU’s estimate that about 100,000 people are engaged on casual contracts in the sector, the magazine concludes: “[I]t is not out of the question to assume that up to 50,000 of our casual colleagues have lost work since the COVID-19 disaster began.”

An NTEU rally at Macquarie University late last year (Credit: WSWS)

That loss would take the total to around 90,000 permanent, fixed-term and

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U.S. job growth slows; nearly four million Americans permanently unemployed

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. employment growth slowed more than expected in September and over 300,000 Americans lost their jobs permanently, dealing a potential blow to President Donald Trump ahead of the fiercely contested Nov. 3 presidential election.

The Labor Department’s closely watched employment report on Friday underscored an urgent need for additional fiscal stimulus to aid the economy’s recovery from a recession triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic. The slowdown in hiring compounds problems for Trump, who announced overnight that he had tested positive for coronavirus.

Just over half of the 22.2 million jobs lost during the pandemic have been recouped. Former Vice President Joe Biden, the Democratic Party nominee, blames the economic turmoil on the White House’s handling of the pandemic, which has killed more than 200,000 people and infected over 7 million in the nation.

“The jobs report adds to Trump’s woes,” said James Knightley, chief international economist at

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