Molokai slow internet causing problems for education, work

HONOLULU (AP) — Slow internet service has become an increasing problem for Molokai residents on Hawaiian Home Lands properties.

Service provided by a single telecom provider has caused difficulties for residents working at home or families engaged in distance learning, Hawaii Public Radio reported Monday.

Sandwich Isles Communication secured an exclusive license with the state Department of Hawaiian Home Lands in 1995 to bring telecom services to rural homestead communities. In return, other companies must use and pay for the Sandwich Isles infrastructure to reach customers.

Sandwich Isles founder Al Hee was convicted of federal tax fraud, served nearly four years in prison and faces nearly $50 million in fines for defrauding the U.S. government. The company was stripped of $257 million in assets.

Democratic state Rep. Lynn DeCoite, who represents Molokai, said she has received numerous complaints from homesteaders.

“Anger, frustration. You can’t even get through to a live

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In Garland ISD, some families struggle with internet connections for online classes

Something strange is happening with the hot spot that Garland ISD’s Shorehaven Elementary loaned 11-year-old Miranda.

When she connects to Zoom for live classes, the internet signal is turned off. But when Zoom turns off, the Wi-Fi comes back and she can do her homework without any problem, said Karina Cossío, the mother of Miranda and 16-month-old twins.

This case illustrates the difficulties many North Texas families face in connecting to virtual classes.

“We have already asked the teachers and they say that other hot spots are fine, that they don’t know what’s going on. They just tell me: turn it on and off, and we already did it but it doesn’t work,“ Cossío said.

Her voice sounded agitated. The breadwinner of the house, she was leaving home and about to drive to work. Miranda goes with her because otherwise she isn’t able to enter her classes. Cossío isn’t sending

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Internet gaps in New York cities complicate remote learning. Here’s how

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Trachelle Bivins and her 5-year-old son, Ondrae Florence, come to the Central Library of Rochester to work on his RCSD online learning.

New York State Team

Story Highlights

  • Thousands of students and families are attempting to access remote learning without a stable internet connection at home.
  • Most cities have areas that don’t have easy internet access, and sometimes the available plans are too expensive.
  • Though districts across the state are attempting to provide devices and mobile connections, the gaps still remain.

For the past few weekdays, Crystal Berroa woke up in the morning not knowing how to help her two young daughters attend school remotely. 

Berroa lives in a shelter in New York City and repeatedly tried to contact school officials to help her daughters log into remote learning classrooms on school-issued iPads.

So far, she hasn’t gotten anywhere.

”If one (iPad) connects and the other doesn’t, I’m screwed,”

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The Internet Archive Makes Access To Education Resources Available To All

The shelter-in-place orders that began in March have uprooted the lives of kids, parents and educators. But there may be a silver lining: the discovery of unique and interesting resources like the San Francisco-based Internet Archive.

Founded in 1996 by Brewster Kahle, Internet Archive is a nonprofit library that offers free books, movies, software, music and more, with the goal of making all human knowledge accessible in digital formats.

There is something for every age group, with billions of websites to choose from, and millions of books, images, audio files and video. The topics are endless and run the gamut from Art History to Zoology and everything in between.


Just like the internet itself, Internet Archive is constantly evolving and adapting to users’ changing technology, research and learning needs. When the pandemic forced classrooms and libraries to close, Internet Archive saw a surge in usage.

And in August, when schools

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More Than 70% of Students Who Fear Lower Grades Due to Online Learning Don’t Always Have Internet Access

WASHINGTON, Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Seventy-one percent (71%) of students who expect lower grades than usual while learning remotely don’t always have access to high-speed internet, according to a new report from The Manifest, a business how-to and news website.

The survey accounts for 400 high school and college students’ impressions on remote learning in the fall 2020 semester.

Internet access is essential for students to attend classes, submit assignments, and collaborate with classmates. Students with limited access have already started to fall behind in class.

Accessibility disproportionately challenges Black, Latino, and Native American students, as well as those living in rural areas.

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More Than 70% of Students Who Fear Lower Grades Due to Online Learning Don’t Always Have Internet Access | News

WASHINGTON, Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Seventy-one percent (71%) of students who expect lower grades than usual while learning remotely don’t always have access to high-speed internet, according to a new report from The Manifest, a business how-to and news website.

The survey accounts for 400 high school and college students’ impressions on remote learning in the fall 2020 semester.

Internet access is essential for students to attend classes, submit assignments, and collaborate with classmates. Students with limited access have already started to fall behind in class.

Accessibility disproportionately challenges Black, Latino, and Native American students, as well as those living in rural areas. Academic achievement gaps resulting from a lack of internet access will most severely impact these groups.

Students Expected to Purchase Expensive Back-to-School Tech Equipment

Expensive technological equipment is another barrier to entry for disadvantaged students participating in remote learning.

Students will need to purchase

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Fears internet issues in Moray schools may affect online learning

Moray Council has been urged to ensure its school infrastructure is fit for online learning amid concerns it is struggling to cope.

Lessons delivered through internet platforms were commonplace before classes returned following the summer holidays.

However, the services remain under consideration in the event pupils need to self-isolate or classes need to be reduced in size if rules surrounding the coronavirus pandemic change.

Yesterday Forres Academy teacher Susan Slater, who is local branch secretary of the EIS union, warned learning may start to suffer amid concerns the internet bandwidth in some schools is already struggling to cope with demand.

She said: “The reality is that if we move towards classes where individuals need to self-isolate then staff will be responding more and more on digital platforms.

“It will be crucial to resolve these issues otherwise there will be an impact on attainment and the workload of class teachers.”

At

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Poor internet makes online education impossible in rural Alberta

ST. ALBERT, ALTA. —
Rural parents are frustrated and feeling left behind as poor internet connections make working and learning from home impossible.

Lisa Rosales and her family live in Sturgeon County. When the COVID-19 pandemic hit, they found they couldn’t even get an internet provider to give them service, stalling efforts to learn and work from home.

The Rosales family moved out to the Calahoo area more than 10 years ago and never needed an internet connection at home. That all changed when schools closed and her two children were suddenly homebound.

“Our kids were sent home and we had no means to teach them,” Rosales said.

Rosales reached out to companies in her area but was denied an internet connection because the only tower nearby is full. The family had no choice, though – internet had become a necessity in order to teach their kids from home. They

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Indianapolis Public Schools internet down, online learning disruption

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Marion County has issued guidance on how to reopen schools safely during the coronavirus pandemic and the new public health order goes into effect on Aug. 6. Here’s how it will work.

Wochit

Indianapolis Public Schools students are seeing a disruption in their virtual learning Tuesday morning. Internet issues prompted the district to announce a two-hour delay just after 9 a.m.

Around 8:30 a.m., the district announced on Twitter that its internet and online services are down. IPS has been doing

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Charter offering 60 days of free internet for virtual learning

Charter is trying to help families that need internet service for virtual learning this school year

ST. LOUIS — With the coronavirus pandemic forcing schools around the area to utilize remote learning, Charter is offering 60 days of free internet service for families in need.

Charter’s Remote Education Offer provides 60 days of free internet access with speeds up to 200 Mbps. In order to qualify, the household needs to be in a Charter Spectrum market and have a K-12 or college student or a teacher. The offer is only good for customers that do not already have Charter service.

“The pandemic has prompted new focus on the technology divide and Charter is committed to being part of the comprehensive solution needed to close these gaps,” said Tom Rutledge, Charter Chairman and CEO.

For more information and to see if you qualify, call 844-310-1198. 

Charter first launched the program in

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