Pompeo and DeVos warn about Confucius Institute influence in US classrooms and campuses

The leaders of the State Department and the Education Department joined forces to warn that K-12 classrooms and universities nationwide are being targeted by the Chinese Communist Party’s influence operations, including the presence of Confucius Institutes on campus.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos sent letters on Friday to the chief state school officers for all 50 states related to grade school and high school education, as well as to the presidents of U.S. colleges and other institutions of higher learning, warning about China’s influence on learning in the United States and specifically calling out Confucius Classrooms and Confucius Institutes.

This comes as the State Department ramps up its critiques of China’s actions (including its coronavirus cover-up, the oppression of the Uyghurs, its power grab in Hong Kong, the military build-up in the South China Sea, China’s potential use of Huawei and apps such as

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Science untangles the elusive power and influence of hope in our lives

On Erin Gruwell’s first day as a high school English teacher, she faced a classroom of 150 “at risk” freshmen. Most of these kids, statistically, were going to fail. They were tough, their young lives already defined by poverty, gangs, violence and low expectations. These students, she wrote, knew nearly every “four-letter word” except one: hope.

Yet four years later, every one of her “at risk” students at Wilson High School in Long Beach, CA, had graduated from high school. More than half went on to graduate from college. The stories written by Gruwell’s students were published as a book called “The Freedom Writers Diary”. It became a New York Times bestseller and in 2007 was made into a major motion picture called “Freedom Writers” starring Hilary Swank.

Hope can be a catalyst for drive, determination and success.
Graduation carries many messages of hope.
Photo by Marleena Garris for Unsplash., CC BY-ND

Gruwell taught English but also taught them an

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Massachusetts poll: Race, education, gender may influence some divergent views about death

Last Words, a three-part Globe Spotlight Team series, exposes the inequities that follow people in Massachusetts to their very last breaths. It is a deep examination into the uncomfortable topic of death, and confronts the state’s failure to protect its most vulnerable in the early days of a historic pandemic. Read the Globe Spotlight report.

A Boston Globe-Suffolk University poll late last year shows that, for the most part, Massachusetts residents share widespread agreement on issues related to the difficult subject of death.

They say society would be better off if end-of-life issues were discussed more openly and believe terminally ill patients should have more options to choose when and how to die. A sizable majority say they would prefer to die at home, and many men and women have first-hand experience with hospice, according to the poll of some 500 residents across the state.

But some major —

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Race, education, gender may influence some divergent views about death

Last Words, a three-part Globe Spotlight Team series, exposes the inequities that follow people in Massachusetts to their very last breaths. It is a deep examination into the uncomfortable topic of death, and confronts the state’s failure to protect its most vulnerable in the early days of a historic pandemic. Read the Globe Spotlight report.



a person sitting at a table in front of a mirror: Danvers resident John Barbieri looks over a collage of photos of his late wife, Ann "Peachie" Barbieri. They were married for more than 60 years.


© Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff
Danvers resident John Barbieri looks over a collage of photos of his late wife, Ann “Peachie” Barbieri. They were married for more than 60 years.

A Boston Globe-Suffolk University poll late last year shows that, for the most part, Massachusetts residents share widespread agreement on issues related to the difficult subject of death.

They say society would be better off if end-of-life issues were discussed more openly and believe terminally ill patients should have more options to choose when and how to die. A sizable majority say they would

Read More