Local Folks: Katelyn Jackson hopes to use medical education to invest in Mississippi | Local News

TUPELO • Even though she’s only in her first year of medical school, Katelynn Jackson wants to leave Mississippi better than she found it.

Jackson, who has lived in Northeast Mississippi for much of her life, is a recent recipient of the Mississippi Rural Physicians Scholarship, which provides around $30,000 per year to recipients enrolled in medical school.

Jackson said she was thrilled when she was awarded the prestigious scholarship because she’s wanted to become a pediatrician ever since she was a young girl.

“I’ve been around children a lot, and I want to be able to impact their lives while they’re young,” she said.

Jackson is a graduate of the Mississippi School for Math and Science and Mississippi State University, and she currently enrolled at the University of Mississippi School of Medicine. She is the daughter of the Rev. Dr. Embra Jackson, senior pastor of First United Methodist Church

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Local nonprofit hopes to educate people on human trafficking, raise awareness

JONESBORO, Ark. (KAIT) – Human trafficking is a very real and scary thing, but what you need to be looking out for may not be what you think.



a screen shot of an open laptop computer sitting on top of a table: Human trafficking is a very real and scary thing, but what you need to be looking out for may not be what you think.


© Provided by Jonesboro KAIT
Human trafficking is a very real and scary thing, but what you need to be looking out for may not be what you think.

Hope Found of Northeast Arkansas is working hard to raise awareness of the dangers of human trafficking, while also advising the signs don’t always look like we expect.

One of the biggest hurdles in educating others on trafficking is debunking the rumors that often overwhelm the fight to stop trafficking.

Co-founder of Hope Found Megan Brown says while it’s important to be aware of your surroundings and be vigilant, properly educating yourself on sex trafficking is the best way to protect yourself and others.

Typically, social media posts about vehicles being tagged, suspicious

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What’s next after a lay-off? FL hopes you consider trade school

Get There Florida is the department of education initiative with the goal to make Florida No. 1 in workforce education in the next ten years.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla — More people are getting back to work again, but thousands are also getting laid off.

If you’ve been thinking about a career change or forced into one, officials with the Florida Department of Education are hoping you’ll consider going to a career and technical college.

Florida’s unemployment numbers are down, according to the Department of Economic Opportunity, but we do not know how many of those jobs are part-time. At Florida State College at Jacksonville, people are hoping the push for trade school will get more people into lasting careers.

“Even as COVID has hit, we have seen an uptick in our career and education tech program,” said FSCJ President Dr. John Avendano.

Get There Florida is the department of education initiative

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VSU’s ‘Blaze the Ballot’ initiative hopes to educate, encourage students to vote

VALDOSTA, Ga. (WALB) – Valdosta State University is on a mission to encourage college students to vote and know why it’s important.



a man and a woman standing on a sidewalk: Valdosta State University launched the “Blaze the Ballot” initiative, which will last until the end of this month.


© Provided by Albany (GA) WALB
Valdosta State University launched the “Blaze the Ballot” initiative, which will last until the end of this month.

They just launched the “Blaze the Ballot” initiative that will last until the end of this month.

“I think it’s so important because we are living in times of uncertainty. There are a lot of things surrounding the 2020 elections,” said Jalen Smith, a sophomore and student assistant with the Office of Student Diversity and Inclusion.



a group of people standing on a sidewalk: VSU is encouraging students to vote with its latest initiative.


© Provided by Albany (GA) WALB
VSU is encouraging students to vote with its latest initiative.

Smith said college students from ages 18 to 29 fall at the bottom of voter turn out.

Their goal is to change that and connect students with information about voting and letting

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Top teacher hopes more equitable system follows pandemic

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A self-described “shy Korean boy,” John Arthur credits his junior high and high school teachers for helping him find his voice.

“If it wasn’t for them, one, I might not have made it through high school, but two, I certainly wouldn’t be a teacher and I wouldn’t have the guts to say anything that’s on my mind or my heart,” said Arthur, addressing the Utah State Board of Education Thursday, moments after being name Utah’s 2021 Teacher of the Year.

Now in his eighth year of teaching, Arthur teaches sixth grade at Meadowlark Elementary School, a Title I school in the Salt Lake City School District. It is there that he pays it forward, helping his students learn to advocate for children and immigrants through music videos that they produce together and share on their YouTube channel, 9thEvermore. Arthur’s students have received national recognition for

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Equity gaps in education growing before pandemic; state hopes to bring change | Education

While the rate of Hoosier students going to college has declined across all races and ethnicity, the report finds gaps are growing among minority students.

Hispanic and Latino students show the lowest college going rate among all students at 51%. However, a 9 percentage point drop in the number of black students attending college in the last five years proves to be the most significant decline among any Hoosier race or ethnicity.

Socioeconomic status also plays a role in students’ progression to college. The report found white men of a local-income were the least likely to continue to college with just 29% pursuing that higher education.


PNW sees overall decline, high retention in fall 2020 enrollment report

Once in college, the report finds, black and Hispanic students are less likely to continue to their second year and eventually complete their higher education.

However, the rate of Hoosiers overall completing their

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Equity gaps in education growing before pandemic; state hopes to bring change | State

A new report from the Indiana Commission for Higher Education shows equity gaps in Hoosier education are growing, and may continue to grow during the coronavirus pandemic.

The commission’s 2020 College Equity Report, released Thursday, shows Indiana’s students are growing increasingly more diverse, yet minority students fall below state averages in going to and completing college.

“We can’t know how and where to target our efforts without first zeroing in on the preparation gaps for our young Hoosiers,” Gov. Eric Holcomb said in a news release. “That’s why this educational equity data is significant for Indiana, because it helps us identify the areas and systems we need to challenge to ensure new generations of Hoosiers are fully equipped for a prosperous future.”

Equity in education is defined by the commission in its third report on student equity as the idea that life’s circumstances or obstacles should not dictate opportunity to

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Pflugerville teacher laid to rest but family hopes her legacy lives on through school namesake

The longtime Pflugerville special education teacher was laid to rest after a four-year battle with esophageal cancer.

PFLUGERVILLE, Texas — A longtime Pflugerville ISD teacher sadly lost her battle to cancer but her name is now in running to be the namesake of Pflugerville Independent School District’s Elementary 22. 

Jessica Carpenter was laid to rest Sunday. 

“We had gotten the diagnosis news back in 2016 in October,” said Jessica’s husband, Aaron Carpenter. 

It was a diagnosis that no husband wants to hear: his wife of over a decade had Stage IV esophageal cancer. 

“[Jessica] went through and did treatment on a continual basis, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and some radiation,” said Aaron Carpenter.

Doctors told the couple that she had only three months to live but they were wrong. 

The teacher of 20 years continued to pour into her students at Brookhollow Elementary for four more years, all while fighting cancer. While

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