Iyesha Chin Phillips from North Pitt High School

GREENVILLE, N.C. (WITN) – WITN’s Teacher of the Week for October 7 is Iyesha Chin Phillips, a special education teacher at North Pitt High School.



a man and a woman sitting on a bench: WITN’s Teacher of the Week for October 7 is Iyesha Phillips, a special education teacher at North Pitt High School.


© Provided by Greenville-N.bern-Washngtn WITN-TV
WITN’s Teacher of the Week for October 7 is Iyesha Phillips, a special education teacher at North Pitt High School.

Phillips began teaching at the high school after graduating from ECU.

She says she didn’t always think teaching would be in her future, but she says “God knew exactly what I needed and where I needed to be.” Now, Phillips says she couldn’t picture herself doing anything else.

Phillips says her job is not just to be a teacher, but also to be a counselor, mother, administrator, nurturer and friend. She says she loves teaching because it is all encompassing and “once you build bonds with your students, you love them for life.”

In the classroom, Phillips prides herself

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Iyesha Phillips from North Pitt High School

GREENVILLE, N.C. (WITN) – WITN’s Teacher of the Week for October 7 is Iyesha Phillips, a special education teacher at North Pitt High School.



a man and a woman sitting on a bench: WITN’s Teacher of the Week for October 7 is Iyesha Phillips, a special education teacher at North Pitt High School.


© Provided by Greenville-N.bern-Washngtn WITN-TV
WITN’s Teacher of the Week for October 7 is Iyesha Phillips, a special education teacher at North Pitt High School.

Phillips began teaching at the high school after graduating from ECU.

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She says she didn’t always think teaching would be in her future, but she says “God knew exactly what I needed and where I needed to be.” Now, Phillips says she couldn’t picture herself doing anything else.

Phillips says her job is not just to be a teacher, but also to be a counselor, mother, administrator, nurturer and friend. She says she loves teaching because it is all encompassing and “once you build bonds with your students, you love them for life.”

In the classroom, Phillips prides herself

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Lansing Catholic High School tweaking online learning option



an empty parking lot in front of a building: Lansing Catholic High School is making changes to online learning.


© Provided by Lansing WILX-TV
Lansing Catholic High School is making changes to online learning.

LANSING, Mich. (WILX) – Lansing Catholic High School is now requiring students who wish to continue online learning to explain why. Administrators say this is to make sure students aren’t taking advantage of the system.

“As long as you have some reason you need to be online, that option will be there for you,” said Dominic Iocco, Lansing Catholic High School President.

Starting this week, Lansing Catholic students wishing to learn from home need to explain why they’re not taking classes in-person.

Iocco said some students used it as an excuse to travel out of state.

“When you get a large number online, and they are using it just so they can spend time in Arizona for example and then complaining they have to be on a Zoom call at 8:30 in the morning

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Battlefield High School Teaching Assistant Dies In Car Accident

HAYMARKET, VA — A teaching assistant at Battlefield High School in Haymarket died in a car accident Friday night. Drew Roadarmel, a 2015 Battlefield High School graduate, was studying to become a teacher, following in her parents’ footsteps.

“She has been an outstanding teaching assistant and was wonderful for our staff and students,” Battlefield High School principal Ryan Ferrera said in an email Saturday to the high school community.

Roadarmel received her master’s degree in special education and teaching from George Mason University this year, according to her LinkedIn page.

One of Roadarmel’s younger brothers is also a Battlefield High School graduate and the other is a senior at the school. Her cousin is a first-year teacher in the school’s science department. Her father is an assistant principal at Battlefield and her mother is a teacher at Bull Run Middle School.

“We will have a difficult time as we grieve

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HCA Healthcare Collaborates With EVERFI to Bring Digital Mental Health and Wellness Course to Middle and High School Students

Health system investing nearly $1 million over next three years to provide education course to school districts across country

HCA Healthcare (NYSE: HCA), one of the nation’s leading healthcare providers, today announced that it has collaborated with EVERFI, an international technology company driving social change through education, to launch an interactive, mental health and wellness digital education course for middle and high school students in conjunction with Mental Illness Awareness Week.

With more than 2,000 sites of care, including 186 hospitals, in communities across 21 states, HCA Healthcare is a leader in behavioral health with the knowledge and data from nearly 200,000 annual behavioral health patient encounters that enable the organization to make positive advances in educating the community about mental illness.

Called Mental Wellness Basics, the course is targeted to reach more than 12,000 middle and high school students in an estimated 105 school districts in Southeast Florida, Western

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Piute School District, Murray High School moving to online learning Monday

SALT LAKE CITY — Murray High School and Piute County School District schools both announced Sunday evening that students will move to online learning starting Monday for the next two weeks.

The news comes after the schools have reached the 15-case threshold for COVID-19. Murray High School plans on holding in-person classes on Monday, Oct. 19, and Piute schools plan on returning on Wednesday, Oct. 21.

“Over 60 Piute High School students were absent on Friday October 2nd for quarantines, isolations, and other illnesses,” read a statement from the district. “The high school has had difficulty finding enough substitutes to fill in for all the teachers and staff that have either been quarantined or requested leave for illness.”

Some Piute groups and one-on-one tutoring may still be provided in person at the school buildings. More specific instructions for digital learning will be provided by each individual school within the district.

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Portland middle school schedules clarified, rural district pushes to reopen high school: The week in education

In late July, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said students may not see the inside of a classroom for months if the state didn’t curb steadily rising coronavirus infections.

For much of August, the average daily rate of new cases steadily fell until it hit a season low in mid-September. Then, rates started to climb.

New state modeling shows what Oregon health officials call a “discouraging” trend as the most optimistic scenario forecasts an average of 800 new cases per day by Oct. 22, or about 19 per 100,000 residents.

That’s nearly double the threshold state health and education officials set for all of Oregon’s students to return to in-person instruction.

Those rising infection rates have dashed some districts’ hopes of allowing their students back into classrooms, most notably in Lane and Douglas counties, where spikes in case counts scuttled districts’ hopes of a state-sanctioned reopening.

Here are some of the

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Meet Jyla and Citlali: kindergartener and high school senior offer lens into online learning

When the coronavirus pandemic shuttered schools last spring, teachers and families braced for a brief interruption of a few weeks.

Instead, the abrupt and often stumbling shift to virtual learning bled from one school year to the next. For half a year, students have entered classrooms through computer screens and connected with schoolmates on video conferences, while teachers improvised online lessons.

Schools scrambled to reimagine education for an era of quarantine, and entered the fall semester better prepared to stream math, science and reading lessons into millions of homes. Despite those ubiquitous live feeds, it’s unclear how well students are learning.

Are online lessons capturing their attention, or leaving their eyes glazed-over from long hours of screen-time? Do they understand teachers’ instructions, and know how to pose questions if they don’t? Do younger students and those with disabilities risk falling behind developmentally? And are those nearing graduation destined for uncertain

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Newsom vetoed high school ethnic studies bill after complaints from Jewish groups about curriculum

SACRAMENTO — Jewish groups angered by their exclusion from a proposed ethnic studies curriculum for California high school students credited their concerns in large part for Gov. Gavin Newsom’s veto of a bill requiring the course for graduation.

It was the latest twist in a fight that has lasted more than a year over whether California’s high school students should be required to take an ethnic studies class and, if so, what should be included. The bill’s author pulled it in 2019 after a similar dispute over the course material. This year a revised version of the bill easily passed the Legislature, but Wednesday night, Newsom vetoed it.

In his veto message, the governor said only that the curriculum still needed more work because it was “insufficiently balanced and inclusive.”

AB331 would have added a one-semester ethnic studies course to the high school graduation requirement, starting with the 2029-30 academic

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