Intelligent Spend Solutions from SAP to Support IDP Education’s Growth

Press release content from PR Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

WALLDORF, Germany, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — SAP SE (NYSE: SAP) today announced that IDP Education, a global leader in international education services, has implemented SAP® Ariba ® and SAP Concur ® solutions to simplify its procure-to-pay processes across its global operations.

Since the global rollout, IDP has increased the percentage of spend contracted with preferred suppliers connected to Ariba Network, helping to increase efficiencies, improve collaboration with suppliers and drive cost savings. Since its phase one rollout in June 2019, IDP’s staff have been able to create more than 4,100 purchase orders using SAP Ariba solutions and submit over 4,900 expenses with SAP Concur solutions.

As a result of its digital transformation, IDP drove cost savings of A$5 million in the first year alone, which equates to

Read More

Higher Education’s Nightmare Scenario

Public colleges face two crises: the impact of Covid-19 on their operations and a downturn in state funding brought on by the current recession. And based on what state budget offices are saying, the funding problem for higher education is about to get a lot worse. Without action by the federal government, higher education in most states will be facing severe cuts, very likely larger than those incurred during the recession of 2008-9. There has already been a large contraction in our industry’s work force, and state systems are feeling the pain: In Pennsylvania, for instance, a plan to lay off approximately 350 faculty members has reportedly been expedited. All of that may merely be prelude to a looming, historic decline in the sector. There is time to act, but the window is closing. Academic leaders are planning now for unprecedented cuts.

The current budget plan for most states

Read More

Department for Education’s handling of pupil data ruled illegal

Video: How does data blunder affect battle against Covid-19? (PA Media)

How does data blunder affect battle against Covid-19?

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

The Department for Education broke the law in its mishandling of the national database containing details of every school pupil in England, the Information Commissioner’s Office has concluded in a highly critical report.

The report marks the second time in less than a year that the DfE has been publicly rebuked by the privacy watchdog for failing to adhere to data protection laws.

After an investigation triggered by complaints from groups including Liberty, the ICO found that the DfE had failed to comply with sections of the general data protection regulation (GDPR). It said there was “no clear picture of what data is held by the DfE” and that its handling of millions of pupil records “could result in multiple data breaches”.

Related: Department of Education

Read More

Cedar Rapids student selected for Iowa Department of Education’s state equity committee

CEDAR RAPIDS — Kennedy High School student Rahma Elsheikh — a student leader in getting the Cedar Rapids school board to pursue anti-racism efforts — was one of seven Iowa students to be selected for the Iowa Department of Education’s state equity committee.

The committee’s mission is to ensure equity in education. Its goals include preparing educators to teach in inclusive and diverse classrooms; ensuring continuing education for educators and leaders to achieve equitable outcomes; attract, recruit, retain and promote educators who represent the student population they serve; and develop partnerships with underserved students and families to drive policies, practices and resources that are equitable to close the educational gap.

“I have experienced firsthand the racism, negligence, and lack of representation and only having one Black teacher,” said Elsheikh, 17.

Elsheikh’s experience as a high school student in Cedar Rapids started at the beginning of President Donald Trump’s term in

Read More

Opponents say proposed amendment could worsen public education’s unmet needs

SALT LAKE CITY — A current and former lawmaker, retired college professors and other education advocates urged a “no” vote Friday to a proposed state constitutional amendment that would expand the uses of income tax revenue to support programs for children and people with disabilities.

In a press conference conducted via Zoom, members of the Utah Citizens Counsel said Utah’s public education system is already underfunded and things could worsen if Utahns vote for Amendment G in the upcoming election.

Julie Miller, a former principal who worked at four Salt Lake City School District elementary schools, said the group agrees that health and social services programs for children and people with disabilities need more funding, but it should not come from tax revenue currently devoted to public education.

State income tax has been solely earmarked for public education for decades. A 1946 constitutional amendment required income tax to be allocated

Read More

Amendment G vague, could worsen public education’s unmet needs, opponents say

SALT LAKE CITY — A current and former lawmaker, retired college professors and other education advocates urged a “no” vote Friday to a proposed state constitutional amendment that would expand the uses of income tax revenue to support programs for children and people with disabilities.

In a press conference conducted via Zoom, members of the Utah Citizens Counsel said Utah’s public education system is already underfunded and things could worsen if Utahns vote for Amendment G in the upcoming election.

Julie Miller, a former principal who worked at four Salt Lake City School District elementary schools, said the group agrees that health and social services programs for children and people with disabilities need more funding, but it should not come from tax revenue currently devoted to public education.

State income tax has been solely earmarked for public education for decades. A 1946 constitutional amendment required income tax to be allocated

Read More

Linden, New Jersey’s School 5 wins US Department of Education’s Blue Ribbon

LINDEN, New Jersey (WABC) — A school in New Jersey has been awarded a national distinction.

The motto at School 5 in Linden is “Where dreams come alive.”

Thursday, the U.S. Department of Education awarded the school its prestigious Blue Ribbon, a recognition of academic excellence.

When the pandemic hit, classrooms were left empty across the country. Kids were going to school from home, but obviously kids and teachers from School 5 in Linden didn’t let a virus derail the hefty goal that they’d set for themselves.

Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos made the announcement in a special video message.

It’s a national education honor that recognizes students performing at high levels or making huge leaps.

One key ingredient that got School 5 is love.

“We always love our students first here at School 5 and once the students know how much they are loved they work hard for us

Read More

Higher Education’s Racial Reckoning – Higher Education

The public lynching of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers, broadcast for 8 minutes and 46 seconds in a constant loop over television and social media, was a turning point in what has become a cultural spectacle of Black death. Floyd’s killing took place amidst the backdrop of a nation reeling from the worst global pandemic in over a century, and just as reports began emerging about the disparately negative impact of COVID-19 on Black communities that showcased persistent structural inequities in healthcare, income, wealth, education, access to government resources and incarceration, organized rallies broke out demonstrating against state mandated stay-at-home orders. The stark contrast between the treatment received by protestors demanding an end to the shutdown in Michigan, who stormed the capitol building carrying assault weapons and tactical gear, nooses, swastikas and Confederate flags, and those in D.C.’s Lafayette Square, who were tear gassed while

Read More