Higher Ed’s Shameful Silence on Diversity

This past summer, far-right media outlets from Fox News to Breitbart flooded the airwaves and the internet with stories about diversity training within the federal government. These features castigated the programs, accusing them of encouraging discrimination against white people, especially white men, by promoting ideas of white racial inferiority.

This, of course, was nonsense. Diversity training does no such thing.

Mary Morten, the president and founder of a company that conducts racial-equity trainings for government agencies and nonprofits, explained recently that the interactive trainings they lead simply “do a variety of things to make sure that people understand some of the history of what bias has looked like in this country, [and] what power and privilege have looked like.” She added that at the end of their sessions, there is always “some action planning” designed to help participants figure out how they can take what they learned and “embed

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55 Higher Education Organizations Condemn Trump’s Executive Order on Diversity Training


On Thursday, the American Council on Education and 54 other higher education associations signed a letter condemning President Donald J. Trump’s Sept. 22 executive order prohibiting diversity training for all federal contractors and grant recipients, including colleges and universities.

Signers of the letter include the Association of American Colleges and Universities, the Common App, the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the Phi Beta Kappa Society and others.

President Donald J. Trump

The executive order seeks to ban training materials “rooted in the pernicious and false belief that America is an irredeemably racist and sexist country; that some people, simply on account of their race or sex, are oppressors.”

The letter accuses the president of causing “concern, confusion, and uncertainty for federal contractors and grant recipients across the country” because of the executive order’s “timing, content, and discordant tone.” It also argues that the prohibition goes against

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Community leaders launch initiative to promote diversity through art, education

This week marks the launch of Fort Bend County’s year-long “Diversity Over Division” initiative — an effort by local leaders to promote inclusiveness and social justice through art and education.

“Our goal is to celebrate our diversity,” said County Judge KP George, whose office spearheaded the initiative. “Fort Bend County is, if not the number one, then one of the most diverse counties in the country. We live in harmony.”

George made his remarks at a news conference at the University of Houston-Sugar Land. The initiative was launched in partnership with U of H, the Fort Bend County Libraries system and numerous community leaders.

“We’ve been in discussions about how UH can collaborate with the community,” said Jay Neal, associate vice president and chief operating officer for UH at Sugar Land. “Looking at the diversity of our student

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Frontier Nursing University Receives INSIGHT Into Diversity Health Professions Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award

2020 Marks the Third Consecutive Year that FNU Receives HEED Award

Versailles, KY, Oct. 05, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Frontier Nursing University (FNU) received the 2020 Health Professions Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, the oldest and largest diversity-focused publication in higher education. This is the third consecutive year that FNU has received this prestigious award. 

As a recipient of the annual Health Professions HEED Award — a national honor recognizing U.S. colleges and universities that demonstrate an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion — FNU will be featured, along with 45 other recipients, in the December 2020 issue of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. 

“The HEED Award process consists of a comprehensive and rigorous application that includes questions relating to the recruitment and retention of students and employees — and best practices for both — continued leadership support for diversity, and other aspects of

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Cybersecurity’s Not So Secret Diversity Problem

Happy National Cybersecurity Awareness Month! In its 17th year of existence, National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM) is continuing to raise awareness about the importance of cybersecurity across the nation. In an age where almost every week we are being notified of breaches of digital information, NCSAM offers the opportunity to continue to educate Americans and corporations about the importance of their cybersecurity teams, their software, and the importance of securing their customer’s information online. The NCSAM’s theme this year is “Do Your Part. #BeCyberSmart” and in supporting that theme, Black Girls Hack is doing our part to highlight the impact of the lack of diversity in Cybersecurity.

While Cybersecurity has many diversity problems, none are more glaring than the lack of women, and the lack of African Americans. In 2019, the Bureau of Labor performed a survey of employed persons detailed by occupation, gender, race and ethnicity. In that survey,

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Bob Woodrick, West Michigan leader in diversity education, dies

GRAND RAPIDS, MI — A man who dedicated much of his life in West Michigan to combating what he called “the disease of racism” has died.

Bob Woodrick died Friday, Oct. 2 at the age of 88, according to a news release from Grand Rapids Community College. He leaves behind a legacy of promoting community conversations and education surrounding the topic of racism, the release states.

GRCC’s Diversity Learning Center, founded in 2006, was renamed the Bob and Aleicia Woodrick Center for Equity and Inclusion in 2016 to celebrate the couple’s work both on and off campus.

As a professional, Woodrick began his career in the family business, D&W Food Centers in Grand Rapids, and worked there his entire life, leaving only for college and the military, the release states.

Woodrick, according to a 1993 Grand Rapids Press story, started working for his father at the age of 14 —

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U of L recognized as top college for diversity by national higher education magazine – Lane Report

Louisville, Ky. – INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine has recognized the University of Louisville as a 2020 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award designee and a 2020 Diversity Champion.

As a recipient of the annual HEED Award, a national honor recognizing U.S. colleges and universities that demonstrate an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion throughout their campus, UofL will be featured, along with 89 other recipients, in the November 2020 HEED Award issue of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine.

INSIGHT Into Diversity also recognizes selected institutions — those that rank in the top tier of HEED Award recipients — as Diversity Champions. These institutions exemplify an unyielding commitment to diversity and inclusion throughout their campus communities, across academic programs and at the highest administrative levels. Known for visionary leadership, Diversity Champions are institutions that serve as role models and set the standard for thousands of other U.S. college campuses striving

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OU college of medicine plans mobile classroom to promote diversity in health professions

OKLAHOMA CITY — A large RV, customized as a health education classroom on wheels, is among the new projects the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine plans with a $2.8 million grant from the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration.

The grant is a one-year supplement that augments an initial $4.7 million award to the OU College of Medicine last year. The aim of the grant is to recruit, retain and admit students from rural, tribal and medically underserved areas, and to expand the primary care experience among current medical students. Data shows that students from those groups who attend medical school and residency in Oklahoma are more likely to return to their communities to practice medicine.

“Of Oklahoma’s 77 counties, 76 have a shortage of primary care physicians, and the need is particularly great in rural areas, underserved communities and tribes. The ultimate goal of this grant is to

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Roaring Fork Schools cultural diversity director named bilingual Leader of the Year by state organization

Amy Fairbanks
Provided

Amy Fairbanks, director of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Education (CLDE) for the Roaring Fork School District, was recognized recently with a top statewide honor.

Fairbanks was recently named Educational Leader of the Year by the Colorado Association for Bilingual Education for 2020.

The award recognizes someone who “has distinguished themselves as an outstanding leader and advocate for emerging bilingual students and families and as an advocate for bilingualism, biculturalism, and biliteracy,” according to a press release. 

“We are extremely fortunate to have Amy as part of our instructional team. Under Amy’s extraordinary leadership, (Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Education) programming and emerging bilingual students in Roaring Fork Schools have benefited greatly,” Rick Holt, Chief Academic Officer for the district, said.

“Amy has not only improved academic programming and outcomes, she has successfully navigated the difficult adaptive challenges of influencing the ways people act to provide equitable access for

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Aspiring to Educate Grant Supports Cabrini Diversity in Education Initiative | Mainlinesuburbanlife

RADNOR — Twenty-five Cabrini School of Education students will receive financial support and mentorship this fall thanks to $53,166 in funding from the Aspiring to Educate (A2E) program, a Cabrini partnership with the School District of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania Department of Education that aims to diversify the professional teacher workforce in the state.

“Cabrini has been at the forefront of the efforts to train more diverse and dynamic educators in Pennsylvania and beyond,” said Beverly R. Bryde, dean of the School of Education. “We are grateful to the state and School District of Philadelphia for their support and shared vision of cultivating professional educators who better represent the diverse communities they serve.”

According to the Commonwealth, 96 percent of Pennsylvania’s more than 120,000 educators are white, and the pipeline of professional educators has been shrinking with 65 percent fewer Pennsylvanians seeking teaching certificates since 2013. The A2E program complements Cabrini’s

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