Scott Fire Department still working to educate kids on fire safety despite COVID-19 challenges

SCOTT, La. (KLFY) — COVID-19 has changed the way we do a lot of things, but the Scott Fire Department isn’t letting the disease stop them from educating kids on fire safety.

“Fires start in seconds, spread in minutes, only giving residents on average three to five minutes to safely escape,” said Scott Fire Chief Chad Sonnier. “Educating young children on fire and fire related hazards is a vital part of any successful fire prevention program.”

Sonnier said as a result of cooking being the leading cause of home fires and home fire injuries, the theme of this year’s Fire Prevention Week (Oct. 4-10) is “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen.”

The department has come up with a new contact-less curriculum that will allow them to educate students in a virtual manner:

  • A fire safety video utilizing Sparky the Fire Dog will be created on our YouTube channel.
  • The
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Health department asks for local input for Community Health Plan | Coronavirus in Kentucky

Community members can set the agenda on Madison County’s health for the future.

Every five years, the Madison County Health Department asks local community members to provide their thoughts and opinions about the level of health experienced in our community. The goal is to establish a five-year strategic Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP) to address top concerns regarding health issues.

The plan happens in three phases: gathering information, analyzing that information, and setting priorities for specific measurable actions, according to a release sent out by the department.

Phase one has been accomplished. People in Madison County participated in a survey in Fall 2019. A partnership between the health department and the EKU Department of Health Promotion and Administration combined the efforts of faculty, staff, and students to provide a scientific survey tool.

The results of the survey and other local data are accessible online at bit.ly/MCHDCHASurvey. After viewing the presentation,

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Tennessee Department of Education has 33% turnover rate under Schwinn

Under the leadership of Commissioner Penny Schwinn, Tennessee’s Department of Education and its affiliates have experienced turnover of one-third of its employees, department data shows.

Since Schwinn took office as commissioner in February 2019, a total of 405 employees, or roughly 33 percent, have left the department. The vast majority of employees leaving the department have resigned – about two-thirds of the total number.

Since last February, 116 employees have resigned from the department’s central office, 19 have retired and 26 were terminated. As of this month, 391 employees remain in the department’s central offices.

A total of 244 employees left the departments’ subsidiaries, including the Achievement School District, State Board of Education, the Energy Efficient Schools Initiative, School Support Services program and the Tennessee Early Intervention System.

In the first nine months of Schwinn’s leadership, the turnover rate at the agency was about 18 percent, an increase from

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Iowa recruit Arland Bruce IV files eligibility appeal with Department of Education

The waiting game continues for Arland Bruce IV.

The Des Moines Register High School Football Super 10 Rankings, Week 5

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And he could be starting the longest wait of them all.

After the Polk County District Court denied their second injunction last Thursday, Bruce and his attorneys have formally filed their eligibility appeal with the Iowa Department of Education, his attorney, Travis Burk, told the Register on Monday.

In the lead-up to the 2020 election, all eyes are on Iowa. Get updates of all things Iowa politics delivered to your inbox.

The DOE now has up to 20 days to schedule a hearing. Then, after the hearing, it has an unlimited amount of time to render a ruling. There are three more weeks remaining in the Iowa high school football regular season.

“We are hoping for an expedited hearing,” Brad Obermeier, Bruce’s other attorney, told

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Massachusetts Department of Education urges 16 school districts in ‘low-risk’ COVID-19 communities to return to in-person learning

The Massachusetts Department of Education is pressuring 16 communities and school districts, which the state deemed “low risk” COVID-19 areas, to return to in-person learning.

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In a letter signed by the Department of Education Commissioner Jeffrey Riley, the agency said its guidelines only recommend remote learning for communities designated as “high risk.” The letter was sent to 16 communities that the state deemed low risk who continue to exclusively offer remote learning.

“In light of the stark discrepancy between local public health data and your reopening plan, I am requesting a timeline by which you anticipate providing in-person instruction for the majority of your students including in-person instruction for vulnerable populations,” Riley said in the letter.

The 16 communities and school districts included:

Amesbury

Belmont

Berkshire Arts and Technology Charter Public (District)

Bourne

Boxford

East Longmeadow

Gardner

Gill-Montague

Hoosac Valley Regional

Manchester Essex Regional

Mohawk Trail

Hawlemont

Pittsfield

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Oregon Department of Education issues ban on hate symbols in public schools

The Oregon Department of Education issued a temporary ban on hate symbols — including the Confederate flag, swastikas and nooses — in public school classrooms in the state, officials said.

The “All Students Belong” rule was adopted unanimously by the state Board of Education on Thursday. Colt Gill, the director of the Department of Education, said the move came as a response to student calls for a ban.

“Our students called us out and into action,” Gill said in a statement. “The Oregon Department of Education is committed to ensuring that Oregon’s schools are safe and inclusive for all students and staff, and the All Students Belong rule is an important step in that process.”

The rule, which took effect immediately, requires school districts to implement policies by Jan. 1 that prohibit the hate symbols, except as part of the teaching curriculum. Officials said that many districts already had similar

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Ruth Benson, pioneering leader of state’s Education Department, dies at 91

A lifelong educator with an insatiable sense of curiosity, Ruth Evelyn (Larsen Randall) Benson delighted in connecting with students.

Benson reached the pinnacle of her profession when she broke new ground as Minnesota’s first female commissioner of education from 1983 to 1990.

But along the way, it was the special connection between teacher and student that perhaps resonated the most, said her daughter, Diane Randall of Washington, D.C.

“She believed teaching is a noble profession, that teaching could make the world a better place,” her daughter said.

Benson, of Apple Valley, died Sept. 10 after a brief hospitalization. She was 91.

Born March 4, 1929, on a farm in Underwood, Iowa, she became an elementary school teacher in Iowa and Nebraska, rising to principal and administrator of Omaha Public Schools beginning in 1967.

Her daughter said she was drawn to teaching, “because she relished learning, the human interaction between teachers

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Department of Education investigating Princeton after school acknowledges systemic racism

Federal authorities launched a sweeping probe of Princeton University after the Ivy League school acknowledged the role systemic racism has played on its campus, the school said Thursday.

The 274-year-old university published a letter from Department of Education Assistant Secretary Robert King saying that Princeton could be asked to return federal funds it has received — totaling $75 million since 2013 — when university President Christopher L. Eisgruber took office.

King focused on a Sept. 2 statement by Eisgruber announcing efforts Princeton would take to combat systemic racism.

“Based on its admitted racism, the U.S. Department of Education is concerned Princeton’s nondiscrimination and equal opportunity assurances in its Program Participation Agreements from at least 2013 to the present may have been false,” King wrote. “The Department is further concerned Princeton perhaps knew, or should have known, these assurances were false at the time they were made.”

The department’s probe of

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Education Department launches investigation after Princeton’s president confronts ‘systemic racism’ on campus

“On September 2, 2020, you admitted Princeton’s educational program is and for decades has been racist,” the Education Department stated in a letter to the university. It cited school President Christopher L. Eisgruber’s statements that racism and the damage it does to people of color persist at Princeton, and that racist assumptions remain embedded in the structures of the university.

Like many universities and other institutions across the country in a summer of racial reckoning, Princeton has been delving into its history and asking what changes it could make. The department’s letter comes at a politically fraught time, weeks before the election, when President Trump has moved to overhaul federal agencies’ racial sensitivity trainings and called for a “pro-American” curriculum in schools that “celebrates the truth about our nation’s great history.”

On Thursday, Trump said that U.S. schools are indoctrinating children with a left-wing agenda and that the result could

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Education Department Investigates Princeton After University Admits to Systemic Racism | Education News

The White House has opened an investigation into Princeton University, accusing it of civil rights violations after its president admitted racism exists at the school.

Earlier this month, Princeton President Christopher Eisgruber published a letter to the university community in which he acknowledged that the university has and continues to be shaped by systemic racism.

“Racism and the damage it does to people of color nevertheless persist at Princeton as in our society, sometimes by conscious intention but more often through unexamined assumptions and stereotypes, ignorance or insensitivity, and the systemic legacy of past decisions and policies,” he wrote, underscoring also that for most of Princeton’s history, the university “intentionally and systematically excluded people of color, women, Jews, and other minorities.”

“Racist assumptions from the past also remain embedded in structures of the University itself,” he added, noting that, for example, Princeton has at least nine departments and programs organized

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