Alameda County Public Health Department Moves to the Cloud to Connect to Callers During COVID-19

The Alameda County Public Health Department (ACPHD) in California manages a broad array of programs and services designed to protect the health and safety of 1.5 million residents across 13 Bay Area cities. Because those services include disease prevention and control, health education, and medical and health care services, the COVID-19 outbreak prompted a spike in phone calls to the organization. The department’s call agents, which typically receive about 300 calls a week, received nearly 1,800 calls per week in March. ACPHD was quickly overwhelmed, causing the average time to handle a call to grow to five minutes and 42 seconds, and the average queue time increasing from nearly nothing to 38 minutes.

“We received an unmanageable number of calls from the public regarding COVID-19 and evolving shelter-in-place orders,” says Stephen De La Vega, information systems manager at ACPHD. “We couldn’t conduct business as usual in that situation.”

Several years

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Tamil Nadu Chief Minister Inaugurates New Projects Of Higher Education Department

Tamil Nadu Chief Minister Inaugurates New Projects Of Higher Education Department

Tamil Nadu Chief Minister Inaugurates New Projects Of Higher Education Department

Chennai:

Tamil Nadu Chief Minister K Palaniswami on Monday inaugurated completed projects of the Higher Education Department at various places. He also laid the foundation for establishing infrastructure facilities of the higher education department, an official press release said.

Buildings and hostels constructed for students at a cost of Rs 58.21 crore at Government Arts and Science Colleges, Government Engineering Colleges, Government Polytechnic Colleges in various districts and Manonmaniam Sundaranar University were inaugurated by the chief minister. He also laid the foundation through video conferencing from the secretariat here for postgraduate and research wings for new departments of Computer Science, Physics and Commerce, hostels for students and residences for the Vice Chancellor on premises of Thiruvalluvar University, Katpadi to come up at a total cost of Rs 25.25 crore, the release said.

In the last nine years, 66 government

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Oregon Department of Corrections weighs cutting ties with community colleges, moving education in-house

The Oregon Department of Corrections is weighing ending its connections to community colleges across the state and proposing to move its education program in-house because of a budget shortfall.

The DOC currently contracts with six community colleges in Oregon to provide high school diploma equivalency services to inmates across its 14 facilities.

Department of Corrections communications manager Jennifer Black told Oregon Public Broadcasting that DOC is proposing the contracts be phased out and the agency hire back those positions as part of the DOC permanent budget going forward.

She said nearly 1,000 inmates were enrolled in the Adult Basic Skill Development program as of Sept. 30.

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, contractors were unable to enter the institutions and ABS (Adult Basic Skills) programming could not be adapted and continued during operation modifications,” she said. “Converting contractor funding to DOC staff positions will allow the department to continue ABS programming during

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LCCC Receives U.S. Department of Education SIP Grant

This post was contributed by a community member. The views expressed here are the author’s own.

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Lehigh Carbon Community College (LCCC) has been selected to receive Title III funding under the Strengthening Institutions Program (SIP) from the U.S. Department of Education.

The grant is for an estimated $2,250,000 over five years. The college is expected to receive $450,000 in this first year of the program, which began Oct. 1.

The Strengthening Institutions Program is designed to help colleges and universities better serve low-income students by providing funds to improve and strengthen academic quality, institutional management and fiscal stability.

LCCC’s project, “Pathways to Success for All Students,” will focus on helping students stay in school and complete their degrees, and it will enhance the use of data to make more informed decisions related to supporting student success. Student success coaches and a career readiness coach will work directly with

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Roaring Fork Schools department director named ‘education leader of the year’ | News

The Colorado Association for Bilingual Education, or CABE, named the Roaring Fork School District’s Amy Fairbanks education leader of the year.

Fairbanks, the district’s director of culturally and linguistically diverse education department, was recognized as “someone who has distinguished themselves as an outstanding leader and advocate for emerging bilingual students and families as an advocate for bilingualism, biculturalism and biliteracy,” an RFSD press release said Wednesday.

“We are extremely fortunate to have Amy as part of our instructional team,” Chief Academic Officer Rick Holt said in a statement. “Under Amy’s extraordinary leadership, CLDE programming and emerging bilingual students in Roaring Fork Schools have benefited greatly. Amy has not only improved academic programming and outcomes, she has successfully navigated the difficult adaptive challenges of influencing the ways people act to provide equitable access for all students.”

CLDE’s role in the district centers around ensuring equity, according to the district website, “to

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TEA finds major failures in HISD’s special ed department, recommends state conservator

Houston ISD has failed to fix “significant, systemic and widespread” issues in its delivery of special education services despite multiple warnings, warranting the appointment of a state conservator with the power to oversee and direct changes in the district, Texas Education Agency officials concluded Tuesday following an 11-month investigation.

In a much-anticipated 44-page report, TEA investigators said the state’s largest school district continues to violate state and federal laws designed to ensure students with disabilities receive needed supports. The investigators recommended

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TEA finds major failures in HISD’s special ed department, recommends state oversight

Houston ISD continues to violate state and federal laws designed to ensure students with disabilities receive needed supports, warranting the appointment of a state conservator with the power to oversee and direct changes in the district, Texas Education Agency officials concluded Tuesday following an 11-month investigation.

In a much-anticipated 44-page report, TEA investigators said the state’s largest school district has failed to fix “significant, systemic and widespread” issues in the delivery of special education services despite multiple reports of shortcomings over the past decade. The investigators recommended Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath appoint a conservator to ensure necessary changes are made, but Morath has not yet announced what actions he will take.

State officials concluded HISD failed to identify all students entitled to special education services, did not provide legally-entitled supports and lacked structures for holding staff members accountable for their performance. The errors came despite warnings in 2011 and

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Lawmakers, superintendents blindsided by Tennessee Education Department learning loss projections

Tennessee Department of Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn’s announcement of COVID-19-related learning loss projections for Tennessee students took state lawmakers and school superintendents by surprise.



a school bus parked in a parking lot


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In a joint news conference with Gov. Bill Lee last week, Schwinn announced Tennessee students are expected to face learning loss of 50% in English and 65 % in math, stressing the importance of in-person learning. Projections were based on national research and early results of beginning-of-year student checkpoint assessments in Tennessee.

“This press release really caught a lot of us off guard,” Henry County Schools Superintendent Leah Watkins told The Center Square. “I feel like this was a smack in the face of my educators, of my team, who have given up summer break to have had to change everything they do to make it work for a dual environment – virtual and in person. It just feels

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The Department Of Education Versus Princeton: What’s At Stake?

Many universities have recently announced plans to address persistent racism in our society and on their campuses. Last week, the Department of Education launched an investigation into one of these, interpreting Princeton’s commitment (as expressed by President Chris Eisgruber) to address the legacies of slavery and Jim Crow as evidence that this institution violated Title VI of the Civil Rights Act. 

The charge is at best inappropriate. With respect to the laws cited in the Department’s accusation, Princeton is in compliance. Princeton does not exclude or deny people participation in its educational programs on the basis of race, color or national origin. Non-discrimination—the thing to which Princeton and other universities attest—is not the same as eradicating racism, the thing Eisgruber

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Virginia Department of Health launches COVID-19 online tools, including one with school metrics | Education

“We hope communities use the tool to understand the data in their locality and also in surrounding counties or localities to help understand the potential risk of introductions and or subsequent transmission in other settings, like school,” Forlano said.

In the Richmond area, only Hanover County brought students back into the classroom on the first day of school. Chesterfield County is returning some K-12 special education students back to in-person instruction on Tuesday, while Henrico County is weighing whether to move to a hybrid model next month. The city of Richmond is opening some school buildings for emergency child care.

VDH recommends that any decisions about in-person instruction or school closures be handled at the local level. The Department of Health has recommended for school systems to prioritize bringing back the highest-need and youngest elementary school students first.

“That guidance has and continues to prioritize the needs of students who

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