BPS teachers, parents criticize in-person learning with COVID trending upward

The mayor delayed the second wave of students returning to in-person learning, but said that high-needs students who returned the week before would continue to come into school buildings.

Speakers and protesters at the rally expressed frustration and surprise that the school district had broken what the union said was an agreement that a positive test rate of 4 percent or above would halt all in-person learning.

Melonie Miller, a fifth-grade teacher at George Conley Elementary School, held a sign during the protest.
Melonie Miller, a fifth-grade teacher at George Conley Elementary School, held a sign during the protest.Erin Clark/Globe Staff

“Four percent is what we agreed upon and that’s what it should be,” said Liv Chaffee, an art teacher who has taught in the BPS system for a dozen years.

She said the district is pressuring teachers by advancing the false narrative that those who choose not to teach in person are abandoning their students. Those teachers would prefer to be in the classroom

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Covid: Wales’ lockdown IT praised but learning hours low

A girl on a virtual lesson on a laptopImage copyright
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A £3m scheme provided laptops to pupils who did not have their own

Wales did well in making sure the poorest pupils had laptops during lockdown but home learning hours were amongst the lowest in the UK, a new study has found.

Education Policy Institute analysis concluded support for children with additional learning needs was insufficient in all parts of the UK.

Disadvantaged pupils lost out most where there were delays and poor decisions, the report said.

Schools reopened fully last month.

But some pupils are having to learn at home again while they self-isolate due to coronavirus cases in their schools.

  • Laptops and 4G internet offered to school pupils
  • Plea to end remote teaching ‘postcode lottery’

The Nuffield Foundation-funded study compared the support for education across Wales, Scotland, England and Northern Ireland during the height of the pandemic.

Schools in Wales closed in

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Total of 106 students, 57 staffers test positive for COVID in Massachusetts schools over the last week, education officials report

Massachusetts school districts have reported 106 new coronavirus cases over the last week among students who are learning in-person or through hybrid instruction, according to the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

Additionally, DESE reports 57 new COVID-19 cases among district staff members. The new cases reflect reporting between Oct. 1 through Oct. 7 across school districts, charter schools, collaboratives and approved special education schools.

The data includes positive cases for students in hybrid or in-person learning models, excluding students in districts that are learning only remotely. Staff cases include employees who have been in a district building within the seven days before the report of the positive case.

Notably, there were eight new cases among students in Haverhill schools, five among students in Hudson schools and Burlington schools and four among students in Hingham schools. Every other district saw three or fewer new cases, with the vast majority

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Jack Dorsey’s #StartSmall Invests $3M in BUILD.org to Reimagine Education During COVID

Press release content from PR Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Twitter and Square Co-Founder and CEO, Jack Dorsey donates $3 million through his #StartSmall initiative to support BUILD.org’s digital initiatives that are reimagining education during COVID-19 and beyond. This investment is a lead gift in the BUILD Opportunity campaign focused on advancing racial equity through youth entrepreneurship.

Start Small’s funding will help scale BUILD’s first digital curriculum, the COVID-19 Virtual Design Challenge, where students apply real world project-based learning and design thinking to create youth-driven solutions for mental and physical wellness during the pandemic. The Challenge helps students channel their anxiety and fear into power and purpose. More digital programming is currently in development, particularly with a focus on racial and economic justice.

″#StartSmall’s investment will make a huge difference in the

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California Primary Care Association and Capital Impact Partners Launch $25 Million COVID Response Loan Fund for Community Health Centers | News

SACRAMENTO, Calif. and ARLINGTON, Va., Oct. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — California’s community health centers (CHCs) are facing significant lost revenue as a result of business disruptions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, CHCs are incurring unforeseen costs to implement technology for virtual health consultations. The impacts of the pandemic have been further exacerbated for many CHCs by the wildfires plaguing the state.

To bridge this cash flow gap, the California Primary Care Association (CPCA) and Capital Impact Partners have launched the $25 million CPCA COVID Response Loan Fund to provide flexible financing for CHCs. Fund investors include the Alliance Healthcare Foundation, The California Endowment, The California Wellness Foundation, JPMorgan Chase, Richard W. Goldman Family Foundation, and UnitedHealth Group.

It is a vital need, as CHCs not only serve one-in-six Californians, but also a predominate number of patients who fall below the federal poverty level.  California CHCs

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California Primary Care Association and Capital Impact Partners Launch $25 Million COVID Response Loan Fund for Community Health Centers

SACRAMENTO, Calif. and ARLINGTON, Va., Oct. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — California’s community health centers (CHCs) are facing significant lost revenue as a result of business disruptions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, CHCs are incurring unforeseen costs to implement technology for virtual health consultations. The impacts of the pandemic have been further exacerbated for many CHCs by the wildfires plaguing the state.

To bridge this cash flow gap, the California Primary Care Association (CPCA) and Capital Impact Partners have launched the $25 million CPCA COVID Response Loan Fund to provide flexible financing for CHCs. Fund investors include the Alliance Healthcare Foundation, The California Endowment, The California Wellness Foundation, JPMorgan Chase, Richard W. Goldman Family Foundation, and UnitedHealth Group.

It is a vital need, as CHCs not only serve one-in-six Californians, but also a predominate number of patients who fall below the federal poverty level.  California CHCs

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North Carolina Sets Oct. 31 Continuing Education Deadline After COVID Delay

All licensed insurance producers and adjusters operating in North Carolina with a continuing education compliance period that ended in February, March, April, May and June 2020 must complete the state mandated CE requirements by Oct. 31, 2020 or face having their license expire, according to a bulletin from the North Carolina Department of Insurance (NCDOI).

For those with a compliance period that ends in July, August, September, October and November 2020, an extension will be granted through Dec. 31, 2020 in order to meet the state mandated CE requirements. If the CE requirements are not met by December 31, 2020, licenses will expire.

Each licensees CE deadline month is based on birth date and the requirements also include North Carolina nonresident adjusters with NC as the Designated Home State (DHS).

The CE deadline for North Carolina producers and adjusters, including nonresident adjusters with North Carolina as the designated home state

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Three major universities move to online learning amid Covid surges

Students, including those at Birley Halls student accommodation at Manchester Metropolitan University, will move to online learning after a surge in Covid-19 cases (Peter Byrne/PA)

The restart of Britain’s education sector has been dealt a severe blow after three of the country’s largest universities shifted to online classes due to coronavirus outbreaks.

More than 50 universities in the UK have confirmed cases of Covid-19, after thousands of undergraduates returned to campus for the start of the autumn term.



Manchester University, where there have been 382 coronavirus cases since September 21, joined with Manchester Metropolitan University and the University of Sheffield in announcing a move to online learning to protect the health of students and staff.

The Manchester universities said they had made the decision together in consultation with the area’s director of public health, supported by Public Health England.

They added they would increase the level of online learning for

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Poland’s new education minister tests positive for COVID, swearing-in postponed

WARSAW (Reuters) – Poland rescheduled a ceremony at which the president was to confirm new ministers on Monday, after the incoming education minister said he had tested positive for coronavirus.

Przemyslaw Czarnek, 43, announced he had been infected ahead of an event at the presidential palace, where President Andrzej Duda was due to confirm the cabinet line-up after a government reshuffle announced last week.

“I was tested this morning due to a headache so as not to expose the President, the cabinet and other participants in today’s events. I feel good. Don’t underestimate the symptoms,” Czarnek, said in a tweet posted on Monday.

The ceremony was moved to Tuesday, Presidential spokesman Blazej Spychalski told public television.

Health authorities said that anyone who had contact with Czarnek between Oct. 2 and Oct. 5 would have to self-isolate.

The government spokesman said on Twitter that those people included Deputy Prime Minister Jacek

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COVID has quickened a digital day of reckoning for higher education

It was inevitable. The visionaries who developed the web likely saw the possibilities early on. The University of Phoenix, Western Governors University, Southern New Hampshire University and Capella University were among the first movers. At least a decade ago the challenge become obvious to the rest of higher education as the finest universities in the country started putting their course offering online in various ways. Then some traditional institutions like Arizona State University went all in.

Online vs. residential education had become a real choice for students seeking higher education.

The initial focus of online learning in higher education was nontraditional students: working or older adults and those who might want to dabble but were not necessarily pursuing a degree. The vast majority of traditionally aged undergraduates rarely explored their online options, in part because most traditional undergraduate institutions continued to focus their efforts on residential experiences.

Then came COVID-19.

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