Canvas Releases Global Research Report on the State of Higher Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Bloomberg

Perelman Selling Almost Everything as Pandemic Roils His Empire

(Bloomberg) — Bit by bit, billionaire Ronald O. Perelman is parting with his treasures.His Gulfstream 650 is on the market. So is his 257-foot yacht. Movers hauled crates of art from his Upper East Side townhouse after he struck a deal with Sotheby’s to sell hundreds of millions of dollars of works.He’s unloaded his stake in Humvee-maker AM General, sold a flavorings company that he’d owned for decades and hired banks to find buyers for stock he holds in other companies.What in the world is going on with Ron Perelman? His exploits on and off Wall Street have been tabloid fare in New York since the go-go 1980s. But now, at an age when most fellow billionaires are kicking back, Perelman, 77, is facing a range of financial challenges, most of all at Revlon Inc., his cosmetics giant.Once touted as

Read More

Higher Education’s Racial Reckoning – Higher Education

The public lynching of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers, broadcast for 8 minutes and 46 seconds in a constant loop over television and social media, was a turning point in what has become a cultural spectacle of Black death. Floyd’s killing took place amidst the backdrop of a nation reeling from the worst global pandemic in over a century, and just as reports began emerging about the disparately negative impact of COVID-19 on Black communities that showcased persistent structural inequities in healthcare, income, wealth, education, access to government resources and incarceration, organized rallies broke out demonstrating against state mandated stay-at-home orders. The stark contrast between the treatment received by protestors demanding an end to the shutdown in Michigan, who stormed the capitol building carrying assault weapons and tactical gear, nooses, swastikas and Confederate flags, and those in D.C.’s Lafayette Square, who were tear gassed while

Read More

COVID-19 Recovery Analysis: Alternative Credentials Market For Higher Education|Widening Skills Gap to boost the Market Growth

Bloomberg

Perelman Selling Almost Everything as Pandemic Roils His Empire

(Bloomberg) — Bit by bit, billionaire Ronald O. Perelman is parting with his treasures.His Gulfstream 650 is on the market. So is his 257-foot yacht. Movers hauled crates of art from his Upper East Side townhouse after he struck a deal with Sotheby’s to sell hundreds of millions of dollars of works.He’s unloaded his stake in Humvee-maker AM General, sold a flavorings company that he’d owned for decades and hired banks to find buyers for stock he holds in other companies.What in the world is going on with Ron Perelman? His exploits on and off Wall Street have been tabloid fare in New York since the go-go 1980s. But now, at an age when most fellow billionaires are kicking back, Perelman, 77, is facing a range of financial challenges, most of all at Revlon Inc., his cosmetics giant.Once touted as

Read More

Carolina named 3rd top public university in Wall Street Journal and Times Higher Education ranking

A new ranking out this week lists Carolina third among all public universities in the United States.

The 2021 Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education College Rankings also listed Carolina 33rd among all public and private universities in the nation. This is the second year in a row that Carolina has maintained those positions in this college ranking.

The rankings are based on 15 factors across four main categories including resources, engagement, outcomes and environment. Carolina scored its highest marks for student outcomes, which looked at graduation rates, reputation, value added to graduate salary and debt after graduation.

The Wall Street Journal and Times Higher Education ranking comes out the same week that U.S. News & World Report’s 2021 Best Colleges rankings listed Carolina fifth among public schools and first for best value schools among public universities in the United States.

“These rankings are a tribute to the faculty and

Read More

Education Department launches investigation after Princeton’s president confronts ‘systemic racism’ on campus

“On September 2, 2020, you admitted Princeton’s educational program is and for decades has been racist,” the Education Department stated in a letter to the university. It cited school President Christopher L. Eisgruber’s statements that racism and the damage it does to people of color persist at Princeton, and that racist assumptions remain embedded in the structures of the university.

Like many universities and other institutions across the country in a summer of racial reckoning, Princeton has been delving into its history and asking what changes it could make. The department’s letter comes at a politically fraught time, weeks before the election, when President Trump has moved to overhaul federal agencies’ racial sensitivity trainings and called for a “pro-American” curriculum in schools that “celebrates the truth about our nation’s great history.”

On Thursday, Trump said that U.S. schools are indoctrinating children with a left-wing agenda and that the result could

Read More

Education Department Investigates Princeton After University Admits to Systemic Racism | Education News

The White House has opened an investigation into Princeton University, accusing it of civil rights violations after its president admitted racism exists at the school.

Earlier this month, Princeton President Christopher Eisgruber published a letter to the university community in which he acknowledged that the university has and continues to be shaped by systemic racism.

“Racism and the damage it does to people of color nevertheless persist at Princeton as in our society, sometimes by conscious intention but more often through unexamined assumptions and stereotypes, ignorance or insensitivity, and the systemic legacy of past decisions and policies,” he wrote, underscoring also that for most of Princeton’s history, the university “intentionally and systematically excluded people of color, women, Jews, and other minorities.”

“Racist assumptions from the past also remain embedded in structures of the University itself,” he added, noting that, for example, Princeton has at least nine departments and programs organized

Read More

These Mass. colleges were ranked among the best in the US by the Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education

2020 has been the year of a once-in-a-century global pandemic and Tom Brady taking the field wearing something other than a New England Patriots jersey. But despite all the changes this year brought, Massachusetts universities are still topping nationwide rankings.

Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have landed the No. 1 and No. 2 spots, respectively, on the Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education’s list of best overall colleges in the nation.

2020 marks the fourth straight year Harvard has taken the top spot on the WSJ/THE annual list.

Here are the other universities that made the cut:

1. Harvard University

2. MIT

3. Yale University

4. Stanford University

5. Brown University and Duke University (tied)

7. California Institute of Technology and Princeton University (tied)

9. Cornell University

10. Northwestern University

Harvard and MIT also made it on the WSJ/THE list of top 10 schools for student outcomes, which

Read More

COVID-19 laid bare the inequities in Higher Education. Now, we risk losing an entire generation

When COVID-19 peaked in the Northeast, my home state of New Jersey moved into lockdown, including remote instruction for the state college and university systems. This educational shift, the virus’s disproportionate impact on Black and brown communities, and economic dislocation have had enormous impacts on the aspirations of students from low-income families who seek the transformational power of higher education.

For many families living below the poverty line in New Jersey and across the country, public universities and community colleges offer opportunity: to be the first in the family to receive a college education and to take a step up the ladder of social mobility. Today, one-fifth of college students nationally come from low-income backgrounds, and more than half are first-generation students — many of whom rely on public education institutions to transform their lives and the lives of their families. Even as economic mobility has decreased in the

Read More

Increased Use Of Tech In Higher Education During Covid-19 Exemplifies True Grit

The business world teems with buzzwords. Buzzwords reach epic heights, then tragically die after rampant overuse. Grit is one word that ebbs and flows in popularity, but, by all appearances, has yet to be marked with the scarlet b and remains a respected word that signifies a propensity for success.

American psychologist Angela Lee Duckworth took the term grit to new heights in her 2013 TED Talk titled Grit: The power of passion and perseverance where she shared her five characteristics of grit.

At a time where opinions on today’s hybrid learning delivery methods are nothing short of loudly divided, beyond the hysteria our fall 2020 higher education experience exudes true grit of those on the education delivery front lines.

It is easy to show how Duckworth’s 5

Read More