StoryCorps: Under pandemic stressors, special ed teams vow to ‘put the children first’

"I hear that all the time, 'The children come first, the children come first,' " Fisher said. "We are going to put real muscle behind that statement," occupational therapist Debra Fisher, right, said in a StoryCorps interview with special education teacher Emma Pelosi.

“I hear that all the time, ‘The children come first, the children come first,’ ” Fisher said. “We are going to put real muscle behind that statement,” occupational therapist Debra Fisher, right, said in a StoryCorps interview with special education teacher Emma Pelosi.

Courtesy of Debra Fisher and Emma Pelosi

New York City public schools reopened part-time this past week, but preparing to get more than 1 million children back to school, whether in-person or virtually, hasn’t gone smoothly.

Last-minute schedule changes have left parents, teachers and students frustrated and confused.

Fortunately, Emma Pelosi and Debra Fisher, who work with young children with special needs in New York City public schools, have been able to lean on each other during the chaotic moments.

Pelosi, a special education teacher, and Fisher, an occupational therapist, work in two separate New York City public elementary schools, and met over Twitter a few months

Read More

Under Pandemic Stressors, NYC Special Ed Teams Vow To ‘Put The Children First’ : NPR

“I hear that all the time, ‘The children come first, the children come first,’ ” Fisher said. “We are going to put real muscle behind that statement,” occupational therapist Debra Fisher, right, said in a StoryCorps interview with special education teacher Emma Pelosi.

Courtesy of Debra Fisher and Emma Pelosi


hide caption

toggle caption

Courtesy of Debra Fisher and Emma Pelosi

“I hear that all the time, ‘The children come first, the children come first,’ ” Fisher said. “We are going to put real muscle behind that statement,” occupational therapist Debra Fisher, right, said in a StoryCorps interview with special education teacher Emma Pelosi.

Courtesy of Debra Fisher and Emma Pelosi

New York City Public Schools reopened part-time this week, but preparing to get more than 1 million children back to school, whether in-person or virtually, hasn’t gone smoothly.

Last minute schedule changes have left parents, teachers and students frustrated

Read More

As Trump continues to press for coronavirus vaccine by Election Day, public health officials vow ‘no cutting corners’

ASSOCIATED PRESS



a man wearing a suit and tie: Stephen Hahn, commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, testifies Wednesday at a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee Hearing on the federal response to COVID-19.


© Associated Press
Stephen Hahn, commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, testifies Wednesday at a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee Hearing on the federal response to COVID-19.

WASHINGTON (AP) — A huge international study of a COVID-19 vaccine that aims to work with just one dose is getting underway as top U.S. health officials sought Wednesday to assure a skeptical Congress and public that they can trust any shots the government ultimately approves.

Hopes are high that answers about at least one of several candidates being tested in the U.S. could come by year’s end.

‘President Trump is still trying to sabotage the work of our scientists and public health experts for his own political ends.’ — Sen. Patty Murray

“We feel cautiously optimistic that we will be able to have a safe and effective vaccine, although there is never a guarantee of that,”

Read More

Public Health Leaders Vow Science, Not Politics, Will Guide COVID-19 Vaccine

Updated at 1:37 p.m. ET

Amid criticism from Democrats that politics may be guiding decisions at the nation’s top health agencies, the commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration told Congress on Wednesday that a coronavirus vaccine would not be approved until it met “vigorous expectations” for safety and effectiveness.

“Decisions to authorize or approve any such vaccine or therapeutic will be made by the dedicated career staff at FDA through our thorough review processes, and science will guide our decisions,” FDA commissioner Stephen Hahn told senators.

Hahn continued: “FDA will not permit any pressure from anyone to change that. I will fight for science … I will fight for the integrity of the agency, and I will put the interests of the American people before anything else.”

Four of the top federal officials responsible for managing the coronavirus pandemic all testified before of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and

Read More

Watch Live: Public Health Leaders Vow Science, Not Politics, Will Guide Vaccine

Wednesday, September 23, 2020

Photo caption:

Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET

Amid criticism from Democrats that politics may be guiding decisions at the nation’s top health agencies, the commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration told Congress on Wednesday that a coronavirus vaccine would not be approved until it met “vigorous expectations” for safety and effectiveness.

“Decisions to authorize or approve any such vaccine or therapeutic will be made by the dedicated career staff at FDA through our thorough review processes, and science will guide our decisions,” FDA commissioner Stephen Hahn told senators.

Continued Hahn: “FDA will not permit any pressure from anyone to change that. I will fight for science … I will fight for the integrity of the agency, and I will put the interests of the American people before anything else.”

Four of the top federal officials responsible for managing the coronavirus pandemic are testifying

Read More