National Tertiary Education Union concerned university course fee hike could lead to more job cuts at La Trobe University | Bendigo Advertiser

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CHANGES to university course fees will disadvantage students and lead to more higher education redundancies, a regional union president says. The federal parliament last week passed a higher education bill, which was expected to more than double the cost of humanities degrees, and increase the cost of law and commerce courses. Degrees like nursing and engineering were expected to drop in cost under the changes. National Tertiary Education Union La Trobe branch president Virginia Mansell Lees said the increased costs to humanities degrees would disadvantage students who came from regional and low-socioeconomic backgrounds, as well as those who entered university later in life. Read more news: “It really just casts university education down in a way that is unnecessary,” she said. “This plan is really shortsighted. “We don’t want people to feel like they have been left behind because

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Teachers union survey quantifies mental toll from remote learning

Those having the worst time are working on hybrid schedules, with students learning both in-person and from home at the same time, Education Minnesota found.

Union president Denise Specht said in a statement that schools should take any unnecessary tasks off teachers’ plates and stop requiring them to teach students in multiple places at once.

“That arrangement may have seemed like a good idea in August, but it’s not working in October and it may drive out hundreds of teachers by May,” she said.

29% ‘thinking about quitting’

The union said the online survey fielded 9,723 responses between Sept. 23 and Oct. 5. About 83% were teachers, with school nurses, counselors and aides also responding.

Overall, 29%t said they were “thinking about quitting or retiring.”

“Our public schools won’t function if thousands of educators burn out and leave. It’s time to adjust,” Specht said.

However, retirements since May actually are

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Boston Teachers Union planning to sue for all-remote learning as city coronavirus rate rises

The Boston Teachers Union plans to sue in an effort to force Boston Public Schools to go all remote now that the city’s coronavirus infection rate is up.

The union said in a post Thursday morning, “We are seeking injunctive relief regarding the BPS and city’s decision not to comply with the MOA language which requires BPS to transition to full remote learning as a result of the 4.1% COVID-19 positivity rate.”

That’s referring to the seven-day average positivity rate that Mayor Martin Walsh announced Wednesday. The city has long said that 4% is the threshold at which the city will reconsider its path to send BPS students back to some in-person learning.

Walsh on Wednesday said the city would “pause” the next phase in the process, pushing back by at least a week young children going back to school.

Walsh has repeatedly said it’s important to get children back

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Acero charter school network should add, not cut special education positions, union says

Union leaders and their supporters are calling “unconscionable” a decision by the city’s second-largest charter school system’s to slash about two dozen special education positions.

At a time when parents are struggling with remote learning, Acero Schools has chosen to make cuts when they should be adding positions, union leaders said during a Zoom conference call Tuesday. Acero called the claim of cutting staff by half “categorically false.”

“I want to be really, really clear: Acero is choosing to cut positions that serve our most vulnerable population of students. They have told us repeatedly that this is not financially motivated,” said Caroline Rutherford, a union rep for Acero schools.

Rutherford accused Acero of saving “a few pennies on the backs of our students.”

Acero has cut 26 positions — about half of the special education jobs across the organization’s 15-school system — in recent months, union leaders said. The cuts

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Australian university trade union concedes up to 90,000 job losses

By its own admission, the National Tertiary Education Union (NTEU) is presiding over a disaster—the greatest ever destruction of jobs in the Australian university sector.

The October edition of the union’s aptly-titled Sentry online magazine states: “The NTEU can confirm that there have been at least 12,185 positions lost in Australian universities since March. This comprises at least 5,300 continuing positions, 6,486 casual positions and 399 fixed term positions that we are aware of. Sadly, the full figure is likely much higher.”

Based on the NTEU’s estimate that about 100,000 people are engaged on casual contracts in the sector, the magazine concludes: “[I]t is not out of the question to assume that up to 50,000 of our casual colleagues have lost work since the COVID-19 disaster began.”

An NTEU rally at Macquarie University late last year (Credit: WSWS)

That loss would take the total to around 90,000 permanent, fixed-term and

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BayPort Credit Union Wins First in Financial Education, Community Outreach

NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — BayPort Credit Union has won in all four award categories in the 2020 Social Responsibility Awards sponsored by the Virginia Credit Union League (VACUL) and the Credit Union National Association (CUNA). BayPort is recognized for making youth and adult financial education accessible and engaging, excellence in member service, and sustained community giving.

In the Desjardins Youth Financial Education Award category, BayPort won first place for reaching more than 10,000 students with lessons on personal finance basics, credit, budgeting, and identity theft. BayPort was also recognized for its innovative partnership with the Boys & Girls Clubs of The Virginia Peninsula in which the credit union awarded one local club a full makeover and a financial education center.

In the Desjardins Adult Financial Education Award category, BayPort won second place for its digital outreach efforts to members and the community through the launch

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BayPort Credit Union Wins First in Financial Education, Community Outreach | News

NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — BayPort Credit Union has won in all four award categories in the 2020 Social Responsibility Awards sponsored by the Virginia Credit Union League (VACUL) and the Credit Union National Association (CUNA). BayPort is recognized for making youth and adult financial education accessible and engaging, excellence in member service, and sustained community giving.

In the Desjardins Youth Financial Education Award category, BayPort won first place for reaching more than 10,000 students with lessons on personal finance basics, credit, budgeting, and identity theft. BayPort was also recognized for its innovative partnership with the Boys & Girls Clubs of The Virginia Peninsula in which the credit union awarded one local club a full makeover and a financial education center.

In the Desjardins Adult Financial Education Award category, BayPort won second place for its digital outreach efforts to members and the community through the launch

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State education secretary calls Little Rock teachers’ union announcement ‘absurd’

story.lead_photo.captionJohnny Key, right, Secretary of the Arkansas Department of Education, is shown with Governor Asa Hutchinson in this April 6, 2020 file photo.
(Arkansas Democrat-Gazette/ John Sykes Jr.)

Arkansas Education Secretary Johnny Key is calling a Little Rock School District teacher announcement Sunday night that they would only teach via virtual instruction an “absurd, eleventh-hour scheme” by leadership of the Little Rock Education Association, the union organization representing teachers in the district.

LRSD Superintendent Mike Poore sent a letter to parents Sunday night informing them that starting today teachers would not be showing up for in-person classes out of safety concerns related to the pandemic. District spokesperson Pamela Smith said 150 teachers have called in sick as of early Monday morning. Schools remain open with substitutes covering classes.

“During the first five weeks of school, LRSD administrators, educators, and staff have done a tremendous job of providing onsite and virtual

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Puyallup teacher’s union raises PPE concerns as students return to class

Puyallup teachers will be in class to prepare on Monday in order to welcome special education students on Tuesday.

PUYALLUP, Wash — Some Puyallup teachers will be back in their classrooms Monday as they prepare for the return of special education students.

Those students will head back to the classroom Tuesday, but the union that represents the more than 1,400 teachers in the district said they have some concerns about returning students and staff to classrooms.

“We are very concerned about the (personal protective equipment), and that’s a concern that we had on Friday,” said Puyallup Education Association President Karen McNamara. “There has been some emailing back and forth this weekend.”

Teachers will be in the classroom on Monday without students, but the union wants to make sure all the pieces are in place to keep everyone safe, which includes making sure there is enough personal protective equipment.

“They’re telling

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Puyallup teacher’s union raises PPE concerns as students return class

Puyallup teachers will be in class to prepare on Monday in order to welcome Special Education students on Tuesday.

PUYALLUP, Wash — Some Puyallup teachers will be back in their classrooms Monday preparing for the return of Special Education students. 

Those students will head back to the classroom on Tuesday, but the union that represents the more than 1,400 teachers in the district said that they have some concerns about returning students and staff to classrooms.

“We are very concerned about the PPE, and that’s a concern that we had on Friday. There has been some emailing back and forth this weekend,” Puyallup Education Association President Karen McNamara explained.

On the first day, teachers will be there without students, but the union wants to make sure all the pieces are in place to keep everyone safe, which includes making sure there’s enough PPE.

“They’re telling us the cloth masks are

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