Teacher death toll mounts as districts across the US push forward with school reopenings

As more school districts across the US continue to reopen for in-person instruction, without fail they assert to their communities that safety is of the utmost concern. Just two months since schools began reopening in late July, the costs to human health and life expose these assertions as lies. There have been at least 47,376 cases reported in K-12 schools so far this year, and at least 37 educators have died since August 1, all of which were entirely preventable. These figures, as damning as they are, are surely an undercount, as state and federal governments are actively working to conceal the spread of the virus .

In the past two weeks alone, eight teachers have died from COVID-19. Reports of deaths will continue to pour in over the coming weeks and months, and in all likelihood begin to include children, unless an independent intervention of educators, parents and students

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Teachers union survey quantifies mental toll from remote learning

Those having the worst time are working on hybrid schedules, with students learning both in-person and from home at the same time, Education Minnesota found.

Union president Denise Specht said in a statement that schools should take any unnecessary tasks off teachers’ plates and stop requiring them to teach students in multiple places at once.

“That arrangement may have seemed like a good idea in August, but it’s not working in October and it may drive out hundreds of teachers by May,” she said.

29% ‘thinking about quitting’

The union said the online survey fielded 9,723 responses between Sept. 23 and Oct. 5. About 83% were teachers, with school nurses, counselors and aides also responding.

Overall, 29%t said they were “thinking about quitting or retiring.”

“Our public schools won’t function if thousands of educators burn out and leave. It’s time to adjust,” Specht said.

However, retirements since May actually are

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New study shows COVID-19 is taking extreme toll on DREAMers’ jobs, anxiety

In her pursuit of higher education, Ewaoluwa Ogundana is facing new challenges.

“Knowing the number of barriers that I faced, and my parents have faced in the past almost 17 years now, simply just being able to live in this country means a lot to me and my family to obtain a degree,” she said.

Born in Nigeria, Ogundana’s family moved to the United States when she was 4 years old. Now a senior political science student at Trinity Washington University, Ogundana is considered a DREAMer, someone that was brought to America unlawfully as a child but is allowed to work and study here without fear of being deported. Those fears, however, are becoming more of a reality.

Although the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the DACA program earlier this year, there’s still uncertainty about permanent protections and pathways to citizenship for undocumented immigrants.

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services continues to

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