Microban 24 Introduces New 24-Hour Science Experiment to Help Students Learn about Bacteria, No Matter Where They’re Learning

A New Survey from the Brand Reveals the Need for Ongoing Science Education

More than 9 in 10 of parents of school-aged kids (91%) feel that having the whole family learn about how to prevent the spread of bacteria would result in a healthier household, according to a new survey from Microban 24, a revolution in home sanitizing that protects surfaces against bacteria for 24 hours*. As children across the country settle into their new school year routines – whether in person or virtually – there is no better time to teach them about bacteria, and how to protect against them.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201006005305/en/

To download the Microban 24 24-Hour Science Experiment, please visit ptotoday.com/bacteria. (Graphic: Business Wire)

Microban 24 commissioned a survey** conducted online by The Harris Poll in September 2020 amongst over 500 parents of school-aged children (ages 6-17) to

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Why kids need flu vaccines, even if they’re learning online

A doctor tells us why it’s especially important for kids to get a flu vaccine during the coronavirus pandemic – even if they’re not attending school in person.

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. — With flu season fast approaching, doctors want to make sure kids are vaccinated, especially since we’re also dealing with the coronavirus pandemic.

If your little ones are learning remotely, you might think a flu shot isn’t necessary this year – but that’s not the case.

“Just because your child is learning remotely doesn’t mean influenza is moving remotely. It is still out in the community. It’s not just in the schools,” said Frank Esper, MD, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Cleveland Clinic Children’s.  “It’s in stores, at parks and individuals around you. So, we still expect influenza to move from person-to-person and place-to-place.”

Getting a flu shot is especially important to help reduce the number of hospitalizations

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Do Australians care about unis? They’re now part of our social wage, so we should

In 1988, then federal education minister, John Dawkins, drew upon the politics of class privilege to justify rolling out HECS student loans. A university user-pays system was needed, he argued, because Labor was not in the business of funding “middle-class welfare”. At the time, one reason a neoliberal appeal by Labor to its base could deflate widespread public opposition was that just 7% of working-age Australians held a degree.

Three decades on, Education Minister Dan Tehan is also dog-whistling up the politics of class to cut off the loans system to first-year students who fail half their subjects, ramp up fees for many others, deny JobKeeper to workers in the sector and cut funding.




Read more:
The government would save $1 billion a year with proposed university reforms — but that’s not what it’s telling us


Portrait of John Dawkins
Today 33% of working-age Australians have a degree, a big jump from 7% in
Read More

Do Australians care about unis? They’re now part of our social wage, so they should

In 1988, then federal education minister, John Dawkins, drew upon the politics of class privilege to justify rolling out HECS student loans. A university user-pays system was needed, he argued, because Labor was not in the business of funding “middle-class welfare”. At the time, one reason a neoliberal appeal by Labor to its base could deflate widespread public opposition was that just 7% of working-age Australians held a degree.

Three decades on, Education Minister Dan Tehan is also dog-whistling up the politics of class to cut off the loans system to first-year students who fail half their subjects, ramp up fees for many others, deny JobKeeper to workers in the sector and cut funding.




Read more:
The government would save $1 billion a year with proposed university reforms — but that’s not what it’s telling us


Portrait of John Dawkins
Today 33% of working-age Australians have a degree, a big jump from 7% in
Read More

How one group works to keep kids in school, even if they’re learning online

AUSTIN (KXAN) — When schools shut down in March, Rukiya Mukarram didn’t know what the future would hold.

“At the time, we didn’t know, how long this thing was going to last. I thought they were going to go back after spring and finish graduation,” Rukiya said.

When that didn’t happen, Rukiya’s son Jibril was forced to finish his senior year of high school online. And that meant a non-profit organization that connected to the Mukarrams and other families in Central Texas through their schools faced a challenge as well.

The Mukarram family (Courtesy Mukarram family)
Daiyan Mukarram, Rukiya Mukarram and Jibril Mukarram (Courtesy Mukarram family)

Communities in Schools has worked for decades to stay true to its mission of education and dropout prevention. Normally, CIS volunteers and staff meet in-person with nearly 6,000 students on 96 campuses across seven school districts. In addition to education, CIS volunteers build relationships and help families experiencing homelessness, food

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