Superintendents worry about academic slide, cite community criticism

New Hampshire superintendents told lawmakers they have concerns about upcoming school vacations and “academic slide,” at the same time citing criticism they have received from their communities over decisions related to COVID-19.

Five superintendents, representing different regions of the state, met with the Joint House and Senate Education Committee Wednesday via Zoom webinar to discuss their successes and concerns around COVID-19. The hearing was part of a four-hour session, where the committee also heard from area principals, school nurses and special educators.

Several superintendents mentioned concern over upcoming Thanksgiving and winter breaks, and the impact it could have if students or employees choose to travel out of state. New Hampshire requires everyone traveling into the state from non-New England states to self-quarantine for two weeks after arrival.

Many districts are facing staff shortages for in-person learning, which becomes an issue when employees are required to quarantine. 

“We are stuck in

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TPS parents push for district to return to in-person learning; superintendent’s recommendation to be made Monday | Education

Deere said she plans to attend Monday’s rally because she doesn’t believe the numerous emails sent to board members and administrators are working. She said she hopes that if enough people show up in force, then the district might listen.

But if TPS decides to stick with distance learning, she said her plan is to transfer her children out of the district. That outcome would be especially devastating to her son, who attends Thoreau Demonstration Academy and who would lose his spot if he leaves.

“They just can’t keep doing distance learning,” Deere said. “My boys seem to be coping a bit better, but my daughter, she’s not.”

Danny Daniels, whose son attends Eisenhower International School, is pushing for the district to abandon district learning because of the lack of social interaction between students and their teachers and peers.

Like Deere, Daniels said he thinks the best way for families

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Lawmakers, superintendents blindsided by Tennessee Education Department learning loss projections

Tennessee Department of Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn’s announcement of COVID-19-related learning loss projections for Tennessee students took state lawmakers and school superintendents by surprise.



a school bus parked in a parking lot


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In a joint news conference with Gov. Bill Lee last week, Schwinn announced Tennessee students are expected to face learning loss of 50% in English and 65 % in math, stressing the importance of in-person learning. Projections were based on national research and early results of beginning-of-year student checkpoint assessments in Tennessee.

“This press release really caught a lot of us off guard,” Henry County Schools Superintendent Leah Watkins told The Center Square. “I feel like this was a smack in the face of my educators, of my team, who have given up summer break to have had to change everything they do to make it work for a dual environment – virtual and in person. It just feels

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S.D. education secretary holds pandemic calls each week with K-12 school superintendents

PIERRE, S.D. (KELO) — Weekly talks with heads of South Dakota’s K-12 districts about COVID-19 are open to a state panel that sets regulations for the school systems, the state education secretary said Monday.

Ben Jones told the state Board of Education Standards at its meeting in Aberdeen that approximately 140 to 190 superintendents and others participate in the calls each Thursday. He said the calls had been daily last spring.

The board’s president, former teacher Jacqueline Sly of Rapid City, said board members would like to be able to answer more than “I don’t know” when people ask about South Dakota schools during the pandemic.

“We can certainly do that,” Jones said. He said it was good to have students back in the classrooms taking courses face to face with teachers this fall semester. Classrooms shut down in March and schools switched to online courses to finish spring semester.

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