COVID-19 and schools: Advice from Houston educators to parents struggling with helping kids learn from home

HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) — Virtual learning is well underway for many school children across Southeast Texas, and some school districts have returned to in-person instruction, like Fort Bend ISD.

Fort Bend ISD Superintendent Dr. Charles Dupre said some students need an in-person learning environment to thrive.

“We have many students [that] need more direct interaction, those kinds of things,” he said.

But many parents, for whom virtual learning is the only option, are struggling to balance their new roles as teachers and technology experts with their already-existing responsibilities.

Kinsey Wall, a mother of two boys who attend a Houston ISD school, said her family is doing their best to support the children, but that it can be challenging.

SEE ALSO: 4 tips to help you manage working from home as kids learn from home

“I’m the tech support for the Wall family,” she said. “If I’m struggling to find things

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Higher education minister foresees 75,000 fresh grads struggling to get jobs in Covid-19 era



Noraini Ahmad wearing a purple shirt: Higher Education Minister Datuk Noraini Ahmad speaks during The Ministry of Higher Education-Career Advancement Programme (KPT-CAP) Economic Recovery Plan (Penjana) at University Kebangsaan Malaysia in Bangi September 28, 2020. ― Picture by Yusof Mat Isa


© Provided by Malay Mail
Higher Education Minister Datuk Noraini Ahmad speaks during The Ministry of Higher Education-Career Advancement Programme (KPT-CAP) Economic Recovery Plan (Penjana) at University Kebangsaan Malaysia in Bangi September 28, 2020. ― Picture by Yusof Mat Isa

BANGI, Sept 28 — The economic challenges caused by the Covid-19 pandemic could add more hurdles to some 75,000 fresh graduates in finding employment this year, Higher Education Minister Datuk Seri Noraini Ahmad said today.

She said the estimation is based on last year’s unemployment figures among fresh graduates, where out of 330,557 persons, 41,161 or 13.8 per cent remain unemployed.

“In 2020, it is estimated that 300,000 graduates are due to complete their respective education. Taking into account the impact of Covid-19, the ministry estimates that 25 per cent or 75,000 potential graduates will have their employment opportunities disrupted, six months after they graduated.

“Therefore, based on 41,161 graduates

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A special-needs student was struggling to learn online. The whole neighborhood contributed to her schoolhouse.

That was not true just a few months earlier. Throughout the spring, Ixel struggled to learn online at a tiny kitchen table inside her parents’ 850-square-foot Northern Virginia home, while Mom and Dad worked nearby. The second-grader’s learning disability makes it difficult to focus, so she got almost nothing done, despite the best efforts of her Arlington Public Schools teachers — and neither did her parents.

But now, Ixel was sitting in a miniature green-and-white wooden schoolhouse, set on cinder blocks just to the side of the McIntires’ home. Her school-provided iPad rested on a desk painted hot pink.

Her long red hair, split into two high ponytails, glimmered in the light that filtered through the rainbow-colored, semitransparent ceiling. In one corner sat a child-sized stuffed teddy bear: Ixel’s reading nook.

The shed — which Ixel calls her “Rainbow Elementary School” — was the result of months of labor by

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Advocates: Special education struggling in New Mexico | Legislature | New Mexico Legislative Session

Special-education students in New Mexico’s public school system are getting overlooked and underserved during the COVID-19 pandemic, parents and advocates told state lawmakers Thursday.

As they discussed the many challenges facing kids with disabilities — the lack of in-person and ancillary services and a reliance on untrained parents to teach children learning remotely from home as school campuses remain closed — advocates suggested the state’s special-education system is broken. 

“School districts are struggling to provide special-education needs as it is,” Laurel Nesbitt, an attorney with the nonprofit Disability Rights New Mexico, told members of the newly formed Legislative Disabilities Concerns Subcommittee during a remote meeting Thursday. 

Rep. Liz Thomson, D-Albuquerque, the parent of an adult with a disability, put it in blunt terms. Describing what it’s like to walk into a room full of strangers poised to evaluate your child, she said, “It’s adversarial — it’s you against the world,

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