Addressing education inequity requires aligning state aid to community need (Letters)

It was unfortunate to see inaccuracies in a recent article quoting Amherst town budget chief Sean Mangano about our research on equity in state education aid, “School funding report draws town’s criticism,” Oct. 8, page A10. As a regional chamber of commerce and a statewide education advocacy organization, we believe that growing inequality and economic uncertainty necessitates a statewide approach steeped in equity.

Our report shows that 14% of state Chapter 70 aid for schools (almost $800 million a year) is not based on community need. This aid goes predominantly to wealthier communities at the expense of students in less wealthy districts where the state has not fully met its responsibility to fill funding gaps. The Amherst and Amherst-Pelham school districts receive 1 percent or about $7.8 million of that total.

The recommendations in our report redirect $25 million of statewide non-needs-based aid toward communities that need it the most.

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State education board demands $11.2 million back from Epic Charter Schools over state audit findings | Education

Holt began her presentation by setting the record straight on two issues she said have been commonly mischaracterized in public discourse since the release of the state audit report a couple of weeks ago.

She said Gov. Kevin Stitt’s charge to State Auditor and Inspector Cindy Byrd included the task of reviewing annual audits on Epic from the previous three years, but it did not limit the scope of the forensic audit as a whole to any such time period.

In all, $125.2 million of the $458 million allocated to Epic Charter Schools for educating students the past six years was found to have ended up in the coffers of Epic Youth Services, a for-profit charter school management company that has reportedly made millionaires of school co-founders Ben Harris and David Chaney.

“We ask for annual appropriations totaling approximately $3 billion and $125 million works out to about 4.1%,” said

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Genesee County ISD special education funding formula violates state law, judge says

FLINT, MI — The formula used to funnel some special education dollars through the Genesee Intermediate School Distrct to local districts violates state law, an administrative law judge has said.

For Flint schools, this could mean the district will get more special education funding because it has a higher than average percentage of special education students. It also could mean less money for school districts with a high total student count but lower percentage of special education students, like Grand Blanc Community Schools.

As it currently stands, the GISD Mandatory Plan appropriates $3.8 million of Act 18 special education funds back to local districts based on a three-part formula: 1. Total special education headcount 2. Full-time-equivalent (FTE) special education student head count 3. Total FTE headcount. FTE head count is adjusted for part-time student numbers. These three factors are currently equally weighted.

However, Administrative Law Judge Michael St. John in

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Meet The Candidate: Sarah Mehrotra For State Board Of Education

WASHINGTON, DC — In addition to voting for president and vice president of the United States in the Nov. 3 general election, voters in Washington, D.C., will choose a delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives; at-large member of the D.C. Council; member of the D.C. Council for wards 2, 4, 7 and 8; U.S. senator; U.S. representative; at-large member of the State Board of Education; member of the State Board of Education for wards 2, 4, 7, and 8; and Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner.

Sarah Mehrotra, 28, is a data and policy analyst at The Education Trust. She is running for the Ward 2 seat on the State Board of Education.

As part of its coverage of the 2020 election, Patch has asked candidates in select races in D.C. to fill out a questionnaire to describe why they think they’re the best person to fill the job they’re running for.

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Sarah Mehrotra For State Board Of Education

WASHINGTON, DC — In addition to voting for president and vice president of the United States in the Nov. 3 general election, voters in Washington, D.C., will choose a delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives; at-large member of the D.C. Council; member of the D.C. Council for wards 2, 4, 7 and 8; U.S. senator; U.S. representative; at-large member of the State Board of Education; member of the State Board of Education for wards 2, 4, 7, and 8; and Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner.

Sarah Mehrotra, 28, is a data and policy analyst at The Education Trust. She is running for the Ward 2 seat on the State Board of Education.

As part of its coverage of the 2020 election, Patch has asked candidates in select races in D.C. to fill out a questionnaire to describe why they think they’re the best person to fill the job they’re running for.

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Ohio state school board has 6 of 11 elected seats up for grabs

Catherine Candisky
 
| The Columbus Dispatch

Voters are electing six members of the state Board of Education this year, including three representing the central Ohio area.

The half-dozen seats are among the 11 elected positions on the board. Another eight members are appointed by the governor.

The 19-member panel creates policy and makes recommendations for K-12 education, and hires the state superintendent.

More: Election 2020: The Columbus Dispatch Voter Guide

While members are elected in nonpartisan races, the board has been political at times. Most recently, the board sparred over a resolution ultimately approved 12-5 in July condemning hate speech and racism in schools, directing the Department of Education to review curriculum models and tests for racial bias, and requiring bias training for employees.

The resolution followed the death of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man killed while in the custody of Minneapolis police, triggering protests across the nation. Conservatives

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State senate candidates: Career and technical education key to environmental, economic success

BRUNSWICK — Supporting career and technical education programs for young people could go a long way toward ensuring a future for Maine that is both economically and environmentally sustainable, according to four candidates vying to represent the Midcoast in the Maine Senate Districts 23 and 24.

Sen. Eloise Vitelli, the Democrat incumbent, and Holly Kopp, a Republican, are running to represent District 23, which encompasses Sagadahoc County and Dresden. Rep Mattie Daughtry, a Democrat, will face Republican Brad Pattershall for the seat representing District 24, which includes Brunswick, Freeport, Harpswell, North Yarmouth and Pownal. 

The four candidates participated in a virtual forum hosted by the Southern Midcoast Chamber of Commerce on Friday. 

Vitelli, Kopp, Daughtry and Pattershall all expressed staunch support for making Region 10 Technical High School, the area’s vocational and technical school, a full-fledged, four-year comprehensive technical high school where students learn career and technical subjects alongside their

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Health department moots state wide health education programme on Covid-19

UDUPI/BENGALURU: With Karnataka reporting Covid19 positive cases upwards of 10000 per day in recent past, the department of health and family welfare will embark on a state-wide health education programme. The campaign aimed at reaching the grassroots level will also use a bouquet of technology at the disposal of the government – social media included, noted Jawaid Akhtar, additional chief secretary to the department on Friday.

Interacting with deputy commissioners, chief executive officers of zilla panchayats and P S Harsha, commissioner, department of information and public relations via video-conference, Akthar said the above programme will be run extensively during October and November. The sharp spiral of Covid19 cases can be checked only with active participation of people, the most important stakeholders and educating them on its need is a must, he said.

Simple practice of wearing a mask in the correct manner, maintaining social distancing, not touching objects needlessly, washing

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Meet 15 candidates running for the D.C. State Board of Education

But while these nonpartisan positions wield little power, they have become symbolic battlegrounds over the future of public education — and the members of the board have emerged as visible education advocates in the city.

Some of the issues dividing the board are mayoral control and, of course, how schools should safely reopen. They also have different opinions on the five-star rating system of schools. The ratings — part of a broader school report card — aim to make school data more accessible. But critics fear the reliance on test scores will reserve the highest accolades for schools that educate the city’s wealthiest students and give paltry ratings to schools that serve the District’s vulnerable children.

This election cycle has drawn nearly 20 candidates for five open seats. (Frazier O’Leary, who holds the Ward 4 seat, is running for reelection unopposed.) And the candidates have attracted tens of thousands of

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Adult education opportunities in Georgia eyed by state lawmakers | News

Georgia lawmakers are looking at ways to boost the number of people who earn high school and college degrees amid a changing labor market that is tending toward more automated technical jobs.

More than 1 million Georgians could become “unemployable” in the coming years due to a shift toward technology-driven jobs that people with lower levels of education cannot fill, according to Stephen Pruitt, president of the nonprofit Southern Regional Education Board.

Without access to adult education, those less-educated Georgians could be left in the lurch by 2030, particularly as the COVID-19 pandemic has sped up automated and online-focused jobs, Pruitt told a Georgia Senate study committee Thursday.

“The reality is we’re going to have plenty of jobs,” Pruitt said. “The question is whether we’re going to have people to take those jobs.”

The Senate Educating Adult Students Study Committee met for the first and perhaps only time Thursday to

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