MATC to continue mostly online learning for spring semester; reports 25 COVID cases | Higher education



Madison College health screener

MATC students must take a health survey and present a green “checkmark” clearing them of COVID-19 symptoms to a security guard before coming onto campus.




Madison Area Technical College expects to follow the same playbook it used this fall for the spring semester: most classes delivered online and students and employees completing a health survey before they can enter campus buildings.

Officials at MATC, also known as Madison College, plan to keep roughly the same ratio of classes, with 70% of them delivered online, 5% taught in-person and 25% operating in a hybrid format, where some elements of the class take place face-to-face and others are delivered online.

Student registration for the spring semester began Monday.



Turina Bakken

Bakken




“We want to offer as much certainty to students and faculty as the uncertainty continues to exist,” Provost Turina Bakken said in an interview. “We

Read More

George Washington University to conduct spring semester online

“Managing this pandemic has called on us all to do our part to keep the community healthy and safe, and to support one another through these difficult decisions,” officials said in an email to the university community.

University leaders considered the spread of the virus, the school’s ability to house students safely and feedback from the community as they weighed the possibility of reopening the campus, according to the announcement.

Based on current conditions, the school said it is also unlikely commencement will be held in person in May.

GWU President Thomas J. ­LeBlanc told the Faculty Senate on Friday the spring semester “will look a lot like it looks right now,” according to the GW Hatchet, the student newspaper. Most classes are being taught remotely; exceptions have been made for a handful of courses that require research or in-person instruction.

The campus has reported 29 positive virus cases since

Read More

Collier, Lee school districts plan learning options for spring semester

CLOSE

Collier County Public Schools will implement health precautions to limit the spread of coronavirus, such as requiring face masks, limiting the number of students in the cafeteria and reducing school bus capacity.

Naples Daily News

Collier and Lee County schools are taking different approaches toward continuing virtual learning options for students next semester.

Many Collier students will be expected to return to their brick-and-mortar schools at the start of the spring semester or enroll in Collier’s virtual school, eCollier Academy, the district’s superintendent announced last week.

Lee County will continue to offer all of its current learning options. 

In Collier, students enrolled in the Classroom Connect and the High School Flexible instructional options will no longer have those options in the spring, according to the district.

Classroom Connect offers live, virtual instruction while High School Flexible is completely flexible learning. Students remain enrolled at their schools for both options.

Read More

Unique challenges: Special education was difficult for families in the spring. Will this fall be better? | Local Education

Leani Tell is starting kindergarten this year.

Like thousands of her peers, she’s doing so from home. Unlike most of them, she would have been at home even without the pandemic that will keep Madison Metropolitan School District buildings mostly closed through at least Oct. 31.

Leani, 4, has spinal muscular atrophy, which causes symptoms similar to those that ALS causes in adults. It also means she is especially susceptible to respiratory infections, with even colds sending her to the hospital for days.

“I didn’t really care a whole lot if kids were going back to school or not because she was never going to be going in-person,” said her mother, Nichole Fritts. “She was always going to be virtual because of her health status.”

But the pandemic is hurting Leani’s education anyway, as the school district is not providing an in-person educational aide as outlined in her Individualized Education

Read More

ASU fall commencement to be held online, spring semester will continue with current learning model

CLOSE

Arizona State University announced on Friday that COVID-19 has again forced the graduation ceremony to be held online and further changes to upcoming classes. 

The in-person, traditional fall commencement ceremony and special interest convocations scheduled for the week of Dec. 14 will now be virtual, the announcement said.

Northern Arizona University made the same announcement on Wednesday. 

Both universities said additional details about the now-virtual ceremonies will be released in the coming weeks.

All three state universities also canceled the spring in-person graduation events earlier this year.

Additionally, Session C classes will now end Dec. 4., and courses in the spring semester will continue to be offered both in-person and online, according to Executive Vice President and University Provost Mark Searle in the announcement.

In addition, all classes after the Nov. 26 and 27 Thanksgiving break will be held remotely only, according to the email. The final exam week

Read More