An increase in racial incidents spurs new generation of social justice leaders to action | News

ANDERSON — At the successful conclusion of the 1984 trial in which an Elwood woman had been acquitted of the murder of her abusive husband, she gave her Superior Court 3 public defender, Patrick Murphy, a token of her gratitude, a figurine of a Ku Klux Klansman.

“I didn’t know this kind of stuff still existed. I didn’t know this stuff went on still, that it really kept going,” said Murphy, now a magistrate in Marion County.

After keeping it tucked away in a box for many years, Murphy eventually disposed of the curiosity.

“I did not display it. It obviously was not my viewpoint,” he said. “It was too disconcerting.”

What’s noteworthy is the woman’s comfort with the Klan’s philosophy, her apparent assumption that others shared her sentiments and her belief the figurine was an appropriate way to demonstrate her appreciation.

This is an example of the white supremacy

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Kaiser Permanente Creates Social Health Playbook for COVID-19 Pandemic

OAKLAND, Calif., Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Kaiser Permanente, the nation’s largest integrated nonprofit health care system, has created guidance that can be widely adopted across the health care industry for assessing COVID-19 patients’ need for social resources that will allow them to safely recover and reduce community spread of the virus.

The Kaiser Permanente COVID-19 Social Health Playbook provides clinical care teams with guidance and tools for screening patients for social needs, connecting them to help, and following up to ensure their needs are met. The initial release of the playbook has a strong focus on addressing COVID-19 patients’ social needs to improve their health outcomes and to prevent further transmission of the virus. It is publicly available as a free resource for care providers across the industry.

Kaiser Permanente has already broadened the scope of its care and services to address crucial factors that affect people’s health,

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Social media use in distance learning raises privacy concerns

Dive Brief:

  • Connecting with students over social media raises equity and privacy concerns, The 74 reports. Though social media sites give teachers a convenient way to connect with students, children younger than 13 are prohibited from signing up for many social media platforms because they collect user data, which runs counter to the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA).
  • Students also may not have access to social media or they may have connectivity issues, making content streaming difficult, and the practice can also raise concerns about the potential for educator misconduct. 
  • Parents are concerned about the digital safety of students, as well, according to a report from the Center for Democracy and Technology that found 62% of parents reporting they are at least somewhat concerned about the privacy and security of data collected by schools, and only 40% saying their child’s school explained to them how it protects this information. 
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Black lawmakers seek to revamp social studies education in Illinois

SPRINGFIELD — Leaders of the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus are urging a complete overhaul of the state’s social studies curriculum to ensure that contributions of Black Americans and other minorities are properly included in history education.

“Something has to happen in this space, where we’re all learning about each other, all of us,” Sen. Kimberly Lightford, a Maywood Democrat, said during a virtual committee hearing. “I’m not saying that we have to teach a special chapter that just teaches Black history. That is a myth. It should be taught throughout.”

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

Tuesday’s joint meeting of the Senate Education and Higher Education committees focused on racial equity in education and workforce development, one of four “pillars” that make up the caucus’s legislative agenda for the upcoming fall veto session.

During that hearing, lawmakers heard from several education officials, including Maurice Swinney, chief equity officer for Chicago Public Schools. CPS is currently in

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CCU to create new college for behavioral and social sciences, education | Myrtle Beach Area News

CONWAY — Coastal Carolina University plans to create a new college within the university, combining existing departments on campus that will include education and behavioral and social sciences, according to an announcement Wednesday by the university’s provost.

In an email to faculty members, Provost Daniel Ennis said he is “pleased to announce the pending formation of the Spadoni College of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (SCBSE) and a national search for a founding dean of this new college.”

“Currently the Spadoni College is quite small in number of students and in number of faculty,” Ennis told the Post and Courier Myrtle Beach. “By adding these other departments into it, it becomes comparable in size to the business school and the humanities college.”

Ennis said the new college, which will be established in the summer of 2021, will raise the profile of social and behavioral sciences.

“At Coastal, because of

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Support teachers on social media with your #TeachersCan stories

TEXAS, USA — World Teachers’ Day is Monday, Oct. 5, and we’re encouraging all Texans to help highlight the teachers who have made a difference in their life and the lives of their family members.

You can share a video or post on social media using the hashtag #TeachersCan and #ThankATeacher to make sure everyone knows about that special person who guided you or a loved one in their education.

We are partnering this year with #TeachersCan, a statewide movement supported by more than 125 partnering businesses and organizations committed to elevating the teaching profession and honoring the critical role teachers play in the success of Texas.

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Teen social networks linked to adult depression

Teens who have a larger number of friends may be less likely to suffer from depression later in life, especially women, a new MSU research study has found.

For female adolescents, popularity can lead to increased depression during the teen years, but can provide lasting benefits of fewer depressive symptoms later in life. Teens who reported fewer friends show higher rates of depression in adulthood, found Molly Copeland (pictured left), assistant professor of sociology, who co- authored the article “The Long Arm of Social Integration: Gender, Adolescent Social Networks, and Adult Depressive Symptom Trajectories” with lead author Christina Kamis, a sociology doctoral candidate at Duke University. It was published Sept. 14 in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

“Adolescence (is) a sensitive period of early life when structural facets of social relationships can have lasting mental health consequences,” wrote Copeland.

Overall, the study found for both men and

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Do Australians care about unis? They’re now part of our social wage, so we should

In 1988, then federal education minister, John Dawkins, drew upon the politics of class privilege to justify rolling out HECS student loans. A university user-pays system was needed, he argued, because Labor was not in the business of funding “middle-class welfare”. At the time, one reason a neoliberal appeal by Labor to its base could deflate widespread public opposition was that just 7% of working-age Australians held a degree.

Three decades on, Education Minister Dan Tehan is also dog-whistling up the politics of class to cut off the loans system to first-year students who fail half their subjects, ramp up fees for many others, deny JobKeeper to workers in the sector and cut funding.




Read more:
The government would save $1 billion a year with proposed university reforms — but that’s not what it’s telling us


Portrait of John Dawkins
Today 33% of working-age Australians have a degree, a big jump from 7% in
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Artist Vito Bonanno Taps Into The Daily Emotional Social

Artist Vito Bonanno

Internationally recognized artist Vito Bonanno taps into the daily emotional and social challenges of living with autism, placing his innermost feelings onto canvas. The New England-based artists’ work is image and concept driven and imbedded in his personal philosophy. His art contains the essence of his life, feelings, thoughts and dreams, coupled around objects or topics that “get stuck in his head”, including traffic lights, grids, ceiling fans, graffiti and pop culture. Corporate clients include Amazon, The Hartford NC, CBRE Nashville and City Block.

Vito Bonanno has exhibited in solo exhibitions during Art Basel Week in Miami, Florida, Umbrella Arts Gallery, NYC and Akus Gallery, at Eastern Connecticut State University (ECSU) in Willimantic, CT. His numerous group exhibitions include a sold out exhibition at Metro Curates, NYC in 2014, Uarts & CT Places in Hartford, CT; New England ADA in Boston, Mass; The Outsider Art Fair in

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Do Australians care about unis? They’re now part of our social wage, so they should

In 1988, then federal education minister, John Dawkins, drew upon the politics of class privilege to justify rolling out HECS student loans. A university user-pays system was needed, he argued, because Labor was not in the business of funding “middle-class welfare”. At the time, one reason a neoliberal appeal by Labor to its base could deflate widespread public opposition was that just 7% of working-age Australians held a degree.

Three decades on, Education Minister Dan Tehan is also dog-whistling up the politics of class to cut off the loans system to first-year students who fail half their subjects, ramp up fees for many others, deny JobKeeper to workers in the sector and cut funding.




Read more:
The government would save $1 billion a year with proposed university reforms — but that’s not what it’s telling us


Portrait of John Dawkins
Today 33% of working-age Australians have a degree, a big jump from 7% in
Read More