Miami faculty adapt to online and hybrid teaching; developing tools and techniques that will serve students far beyond COVID-19 pandemic


By Cliff Peale,  director of executive communications

norm-krumpe-in-studio

Norm Krumpe in the home studio he shares with Jane Keiser (image courtesy Krumpe).

Across all of Miami University’s campuses, faculty are changing the way they teach.

  • In the nursing labs at Miami Regionals, Tina Andrews-Parks used help from the E-campus unit on the Hamilton and Middletown campuses to familiarize herself with SpeedGrader, where she can tabulate and analyze the responses to each question in seconds for her online class. “I won’t go backwards to paper testing,” she said.
  • In information systems and analytics, Bob Leonard uses software that enables students to analyze larger data sets in his online courses. “It’s going to be great bringing newly developed tools back to the classroom, because students will have that (online) scaffolding in addition to their professor as a resource,” he said.
  • In political science, Monica Schneider has recruited speakers to address her Campaigns and
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Higher Education Should Serve Entire Families, Not Just Students

Higher education has a lot of problems right now. It’s also never had more opportunities. The biggest and boldest among them is the opportunity to expand higher education’s mission from being an exclusive and specialized bastion for degree conferrals to a widely inclusive and holistic educational community. What would happen if ‘college’ meant serving entire families and communities instead of individual students? What if the unit of analysis and the focus of service shifted from degree-seeking students to including their families and communities in various ways? What if you could have both exclusivity and inclusiveness in the same strategy by broadening our definitions of ‘education’ and ‘students?’ This is the kind of provocative thinking higher education desperately needs at this point in time.   

A college degree is the ticket to social mobility. That’s the narrative we have

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Majority of Scranton City Council members voice support for two applicants to serve on ethics board | Coronavirus

The majority of Scranton City Council members support appointing a University of Scranton philosophy professor and a senior manager with the State Workers Insurance Fund to the city ethics board.

Council intended to meet in caucus Tuesday with Mayor Paige Gebhardt Cognetti, city Business Administrator Carl Deeley and city Office of Economic and Community Development Director Eileen Cipriani to discuss, among other business, the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on Scranton’s 2020 budget. But, when technical issues temporarily prevented council from broadcasting live on YouTube and delayed the start of the caucus by more than 30 minutes, officials opted to postpone the session with the Cognetti administration until next week.

Anticipating drops in earned income tax, real estate transfer tax and delinquent property, business privilege and mercantile tax revenues, city officials warned in June that 2020 city revenues could drop by $6 million to $10 million as a result of the pandemic.

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Majority of city council members voice support for two applicants to serve on ethics board | Coronavirus

The majority of Scranton City Council members support appointing a University of Scranton philosophy professor and a senior manager with the State Workers Insurance Fund to the city ethics board.

Council intended to meet in caucus Tuesday with Mayor Paige Gebhardt Cognetti, city Business Administrator Carl Deeley and city Office of Economic and Community Development Director Eileen Cipriani to discuss, among other business, the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on Scranton’s 2020 budget. But, when technical issues temporarily prevented council from broadcasting live on YouTube and delayed the start of the caucus by more than 30 minutes, officials opted to postpone the session with the Cognetti administration until next week.

Anticipating drops in earned income tax, real estate transfer tax and delinquent property, business privilege and mercantile tax revenues, city officials warned in June that 2020 city revenues could drop by $6 million to $10 million as a result of the pandemic.

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Special Ed Teachers Desperate For Details On How They’ll Serve High-Needs Students During Pandemic

New York City special education teachers, especially those serving the neediest students, say the city has ignored the unique needs of students with disabilities in its plan to reopen schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. In interviews with Gothamist/WNYC, these teachers say they’re seeking more guidance on how to safely meet the instructional and emotional needs of their students, many of whom will not be able to adhere to mask mandates or social-distancing rules, before school starts next week.

A group of District 75 teachers and paraprofessionals sent a letter to Mayor Bill de Blasio, Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza, and Governor Andrew Cuomo on August 31st asking for a safety plan tailor-made for District 75, the city’s special education district serving students with more significant learning challenges. They say they have yet to receive an answer, or a plan.

“Talk to us. No one is doing that,” said Tameka Solomon, a

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Closed schools have to serve some special education students in person, experts say

Out of all the students struggling with distance learning, students with disabilities need in-person services the most, some San Diego parents and advocates say.

Many special education services — such as hands-on occupational therapy or a one-on-one aide — can’t be replicated well online, parents say. Some are reporting that their children simply aren’t learning and that Zoom is too distracting and impersonal.

Meg Menard, a Tierrasanta mom of a 6-year-old boy with autism who attends Elevate Elementary charter school, said she sits with her son throughout his Zoom classes and reminds him to sit up and pay attention every few seconds. At the same time, she takes care of her three other children and works on a master’s degree.

“He doesn’t want to pay attention to Zoom,” she said of her son. “He doesn’t want to sit down and stare at his iPad…. I have to keep telling him

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