Malawi loses a fine scientist in Ethiopia: Simutowe dies of cardiac arrest | Malawi Nyasa Times

A well known Malawian scientist Franklin Peter Simtowe has passed away  in Ethiopia, it has been learnt.

Dr. Franklin Peter Simtowe

Born in Chitipa District in 1971, Simtowe held a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Agricultural Economics from the University of Bonn and Hohenheim in Germany.

His professional career spans over 25 years of socio-economics research in many international research institutes and organizations including most recently as Africa Director of Monitoring and Evaluation for the Sasakawa Global 2000 based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia;.

He also had a stint as a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Africa Rice Center (WARDA) based in Cotonou, Benin.

Narrating Simtowe’s death, Malawi’s Deputy Ambassador to Ethiopia Mr Sagawa said that Simtowe collapsed in his office at Sasakawa Global 2000 in the afternoon of Friday, 9th October 2020 and is believed to have died on the spot.

He was rushed to Yared hospital in Addis Ababa where

Read More

W&J dedicates Cooper Hall in honor of alumnus, scientist, civil rights leader | Living

Washington & Jefferson College dedicated Cooper Hall, formerly Beau Hall, in honor of Dr. Walter Cooper, a noted research scientist, steward of education and advocate for civil rights during an Oct. 2 ceremony.

Cooper, who at 92 years old has remained active in the W&J community, was honored during a private ceremony held on the W&J campus with friends, family and students in attendance.

“It is indeed an honor (from) this college, which played such a major role in forming my philosophy of life and also provided me with an education that provided a foundation for not only a rewarding pursuit of science and technology, but also provided me with a great interest in the humankind and the problems which our nation faces, and especially [those] the minority of which I’m a part has faced,” Cooper said.

The former Beau Hall, which recently underwent a $1 million renovation, was chosen

Read More

This scientist made a Google Doc to educate the public about airborne coronavirus transmission

Why did you make this document instead of going down the traditional science publishing route?

Science publishing is very slow. For the scale of the pandemic, people need information today. And publishers can be cryptic. They all have their own rules. In reality, you can only publish things that have not been published before, so it’s not a good way to answer questions from the public. And crucially, it needed to be updateable so we can answer people’s questions as they come. In a journal, it would be frozen.

What have been your main frustrations with the response to the evidence around airborne transmission?

Ever since we wrote that letter, signed by 239 scientists, I have been waiting for the landslide. The evidence is now simply overwhelming that the virus is spread through aerosols. The idea it’s mainly droplets is a myth. It’s an error from 1910 made by Charles

Read More