Report argues for student focused approach to improving higher education outcomes

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The FE News Channel gives you the latest education news and updates on emerging education strategies and the #FutureofEducation and the #FutureofWork.

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Messenger: New report finds old culprit in education disparities in St. Louis funding and division | Tony Messenger

This is not just another report to sit on the shelf examining how white students tend to score better on standardized tests than Black students. This is a report that, perhaps for the first time in St. Louis, or at least since the Spainhower Commission study in the 1960s, examines the root causes of that disparity. They are: funding, created by an over-reliance on property taxes; and the divisions created by having 29 separate school districts spread over St. Louis, St. Louis County and St. Charles County, the areas the report examined.

“The right diagnosis is essential for the right treatment,” says Karishma Furtado, one of the report’s authors. Three numbers from the report help tell the story of education disparity in St. Louis. When comparing majority white vs. majority Black school districts, white districts receive $1,698 more per student; the best funded white district spends $8,412 more per child

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Total of 106 students, 57 staffers test positive for COVID in Massachusetts schools over the last week, education officials report

Massachusetts school districts have reported 106 new coronavirus cases over the last week among students who are learning in-person or through hybrid instruction, according to the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

Additionally, DESE reports 57 new COVID-19 cases among district staff members. The new cases reflect reporting between Oct. 1 through Oct. 7 across school districts, charter schools, collaboratives and approved special education schools.

The data includes positive cases for students in hybrid or in-person learning models, excluding students in districts that are learning only remotely. Staff cases include employees who have been in a district building within the seven days before the report of the positive case.

Notably, there were eight new cases among students in Haverhill schools, five among students in Hudson schools and Burlington schools and four among students in Hingham schools. Every other district saw three or fewer new cases, with the vast majority

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A ‘rot at the core of schooling’? The new report that gets education in NZ wrong

New Zealand’s schools are far from perfect, but Auckland school principal Claire Amos argues that a newly-released report critical of our education system is riddled with biased assumptions.

This week the New Zealand Initiative published their latest missive addressing the supposed “rot at the core of schooling in New Zealand”. Briar Lipson’s report titled New Zealand’s Education Delusion: How bad ideas ruined a once world-leading school system claims to explore “the origins and consequences of New Zealand’s unchecked adherence to child-centred orthodoxy, contrasts the scientific consensus about how children learn with the different and, in many ways, contradictory advice given to educators and policymakers, it exposes how parts of the research community confuse evidence with values, and uncovers how curriculum and assessment policy rest on a flawed philosophy”.

In plain English, the author claims that New Zealand education is in the grips of a veritable death spiral as the result

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1-month into remote learning, BPS Board discusses personal report card

BPS Superintendent Dr. Kriner Cash said Wednesday he’s not convinced shifting to hybrid learning right now is the best thing for the district, parents or students.

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Exactly a month since the start of the 2020 school year, the Buffalo Public School Board on Wednesday night reviewed the good and bad about its remote learning plan.

The board members discussed everything from curriculum changes to professional development, as well as how education after the COVID-19 pandemic will change.

For starters, even when kids return to brick and mortar schools, Superintendent Dr. Kriner Cash said online learning is likely here to stay.

“The goal was always to get better in the [online] modality,” Dr. Cash said.

The board members said the flexibility that online learning has provided is a benefit to the district. Professional development was also called a success.

Dr. Cash cited improved bonds between teachers and building

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Ministry rejects scathing report claiming to expose ‘rot at the core of schooling in NZ’



text: Briar Lipson on The AM Show.


© Video – The AM Show; Images – The AM Show/NZ Initiative
Briar Lipson on The AM Show.

The Ministry of Education is brushing off a new report which claims to have uncovered a “rot at the core of schooling in New Zealand”. 

The New Zealand Initiative says Kiwi kids’ declining success in literacy and maths is down to a focus on the “flawed philosophy” of “child-centred learning”.

“We used to be the envy of the world,” report author Briar Lipson told The AM Show on Wednesday.

“Just 20 years ago we were third in the whole world for reading and maths for 15-year-olds, and since then we’ve done nothing but decline. In reading we’re now sixth, and 19th for maths.” 

At the same time as NCEA pass rates have climbed, our students have dropped in the international rankings. 

“We follow what’s called child-centred learning – that sounds like a

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Ministry of Education rejects scathing New Zealand Initiative schooling report

Lipson, who has frequently written and talked about perceived flaws in the NCEA qualification system introduced in the early 2000s, said children have too much freedom in class in how they learn.

The report “exposes how parts of the research community confuse evidence with values. It uncovers how curriculum and assessment policy rest on a flawed philosophy,” she says. 

“Though we want [students] to be independent ultimately, the route to independence is not to practise being independent. The route to creativity and independence is to do things like learning your times tables, construct a sentence, grammar, do your spellings. We’ve just got the balance wrong.” 

The New Zealand Initiative wants “mandatory standardised national assessments” and charter schools brought back, the curriculum to focus on “disciplinary knowledge, not competencies”, and funding for “quantitative and generalisable research that rigorously tests properly formulated hypotheses about what might raise attainment”.

The Ministry of Education

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Amherst budget chief says Boston business groups’ state education funding report guillotines local school district

AMHERST – A proposal by two Boston-based business advocacy groups to alter how the state’s Chapter 70 local aid to school districts is disbursed would take a meat cleaver to the local school district, according to the town’s budget chief Sean Mangano.

Nearly $8 million of state education aid would be lopped off the revenue sheets for Amherst school system and Amherst-Pelham regional district, he said.

The two business groups co-wrote a 23-page report – saying more Chapter 70 school aid should go to the least wealthy cities and towns, and less to more affluent communities.

Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce and Massachusetts Business Alliance for Education jointly wrote the research paper – Ryan Flynn from the Alliance and James Sutherland of the Chamber.

The authors acknowledged assistance from a small group of experts.

Those include two men recently in senior leadership positions at the state Department of Elementary and

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Millions of Americans in non-essential jobs feeling pain of coronavirus: report

WASHINGTON — This spring, Magdalena Valiente was expecting her best year as a Florida-based concert promoter. Now, she wonders if the career she built over three decades is over.

Back in March, Valiente had been planning five tours for Latin Grammy winners Fonseca and Andrés Cepeda and more than 20 for Miami Latin pop band Bacilos. Earning well into six figures during good years, Valiente was hoping to help her youngest son, a high school junior, pay his way through college.

RESTAURANT INDUSTRY LEADER: CORONAVIRUS AID URGENTLY NEEDED TO BATTLE ‘FIGHT OF OUR LIVES’

But with live events canceled, things have turned bleak. She is relying on unemployment benefits and Medicaid and has applied for food stamps. She has lost hope that the crisis will end soon.

This photo provided by Sofia Valiente shows Magdalena Valiente. This

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Opinion | September jobs report shows U.S. economy missing more jobs now than it did at worst point of any prior postwar recession

Here’s the bad news: The nation’s payrolls are still down 10.7 million jobs, or about 7 percent, since their peak in February, when the recession began. That’s enormous. In fact, a higher net share of jobs is still “missing” today, relative to pre-recession times, than was the case even at the worst period of any prior postwar downturn.

The chart below shows percentage changes in employment since the recession began, and how recent trends compare with other postwar downturns and recoveries. The black line plots the Great Recession and its aftermath. At the very worst point for the job market in that business cycle, payrolls were down about 6.3 percent. Now, however, the magnitude of those Great Recession job losses looks slightly less “great” when compared with more recent changes in employment, plotted by the red line.

Another measure of labor market health, the unemployment rate, tells a barely more

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