University of Detroit Mercy adding Novi campus to expand graduate and health education programs | News

The University of Detroit Mercy will be adding a 40,000 square foot campus in Novi to offer additional graduate level and health education programs amid the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The university has acquired the former South University building, located at 41555 W. 12 Mile Road, as community demand for health care graduates increases during the pandemic. The new location will provide access to the institution’s nationally ranked programs for students who wish to stay close to home and their employer.

President Antoine M. Garibaldi said the new campus offers another example of the institution’s bright future as the state and country continue to emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Detroit Mercy’s acquisition of this new campus will allow the university to expand academic programs in the health professions and other fields in which we are strong and that are in demand,” he said. “In addition to this campus’s proximity to several medical

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Podium Education Raises $12M to Help Colleges Offer For-Credit Tech Programs

With the labor market and college campuses reeling from the COVID-19 pandemic, the arrival of new online learning platforms teaching in-demand tech skills to undergraduates comes at a fortuitous time.

That’s the case for the builders of these tools as well, like Podium Education . Since launching at the start of 2020, the Austin, Texas-based startup has partnered with over 20 colleges and more than 1,000 students. And announced $ 12 million in Series A funding.

Podium’s premise is simple: offer online classes, with sophisticated design and production, taught by leading experts in technology fields that are attractive to companies hiring in the modern jobs market. It aims to equip all students, regardless of academic focus, with digital competencies.

“We believe that soft skills plus hard skills create the talents that the workplace demands,” said Brooks Morgan, Podium Education co-founder and CEO. “Whatever your passion is, whatever it is that

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America’s gifted education programs have a race problem. Can it be fixed?

This article about gifted education was produced in partnership with The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education. This is part 1 of the series “Gifted Education’s Race Problem.”

BUFFALO, N.Y. — On a crisp day in early March, two elementary school gifted and talented classes worked on activities in two schools, 3 miles and a world apart.

In airy PS 64 Frederick Law Olmsted, in affluent, white north Buffalo, 22 would-be Arctic explorers wrestled with how to build a shelter if their team leader had frostbite and snow blindness. Unusually for Buffalo’s public schools — where 20 percent of students are white and 46 percent are Black — about half of the fourth grade class was white.

In PS 61 Arthur O. Eve, on the city’s majority-Black East Side, 13 first graders, all of them Black, Latino or Asian American, folded paper

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Cleveland Metroparks to resume outdoor education programs

The programming offers free guided hikes to explore the Park District throughout the fall season.

CLEVELAND — Get ready for some adventure! 

Cleveland Metroparks announced that their outdoor education programs will be returning this weekend. Beginning Saturday, October 17, you will be able to take daily hikes guided by park naturalists across the Park District to explore the fall season in the Emerald Necklace.

A number of hikes will be offered for all ages including birding, history, night hikes as well as family-friendly hikes. Visitors will also have the opportunity for “try-it” sessions, where guests can learn a new outdoor recreation skill from specialists. 

Approximately 40 programs per week will be made made available to those looking to stay active and explore the parks.

“Parks have provided an important outlet for our community this past year and we hope these guided hikes can help us stay active and connected with

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Tennessee education department announces $2M for educator training programs

Aspiring teachers attending seven universities across the state will be able to apply for limited full scholarships, thanks to a $2 million allocation by the Tennessee Department of Education through it’s Grow Your Own teacher education program.

Funded by Grow Your Own grants, university educator training programs partner with school districts to provide tuition-free education for aspiring teachers. Participants work as education assistants at placements in partner school districts, learning under qualified teacher mentors. The program was initiated with an eye to increasing access and removing barriers to the teaching profession.

“The Grow Your Own initiative will expand across the state and support hundreds of individuals to become teachers for free – while employed in our Tennessee school districts,” Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn said. “Right now, it could not be more important to remove barriers to the teaching profession, and I am proud of the way our state is

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More Than 70% Of CPS Bilingual Programs Fall Short

Christopher Perea Ortega, an eighth grader at John Spry elementary on Chicago’s Southwest Side, loves to play guitar and the bass, especially when he is anxious.

Lately, that’s been happening a lot to deal with the stress of sitting at his computer for remote school and trying to understand his teachers in English.

Christopher’s parents only speak in Spanish to their children at home. The shy 14-year-old with a quirky sense of humor was in his school’s transitional bilingual program from kindergarten to fourth grade. He received language support to help transition from learning in Spanish to learning fully in English.

It’s been very rocky, said his mother, Nury Ortega.

“[The program] was really frustrating for us since kindergarten,” Ortega said in Spanish. “We had to make improvements in Spanish, but also in English. … We were told at school that in fourth grade, nobody will speak to him in

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Study highlights need for culturally relevant programs to educate Black communities on hepatitis B

Hepatitis B disproportionately impacts U.S. Blacks, including African American and Haitian Blacks. Both communities suffer from widespread misinformation and access to care issues that might avert disease detection and prevention, according to a study published in Cancer Causes & Control by researchers at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

The study’s findings point to a great need for culturally relevant, community-based interventions that involve and educate Black communities so that they better understand their risks for hepatitis B, get screened, and seek healthcare.

Hepatitis B, or HBV, is a leading cause of liver cancer, which is predicted to surpass breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer as the third leading cause of cancer-related death by 2030, according to the study’s lead author Patricia Jones, M.D., assistant professor of medicine at the Miller School.

In research published last

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UTSA’s growing online degree programs offer students flexibility | UTSA Today | UTSA

UTSA’s growing online degree programs offer students flexibility

OCTOBER 9, 2020 — UTSA continues to see growth in its online degree programs. Currently there are 340 students enrolled in these fully online degree programs, which is an increase of 66% over last year’s enrollment. Growth is expected to continue in the spring, when a new degree program will be added.

The COVID-19 pandemic’s current disruption of education around the world demonstrates the value that comes from the flexibility of online courses.

“The pandemic has shined a blinding light on the need for online courses and the fact that online courses can be taught at the level of traditional courses,” said Suzana Diaz Rosencrans, assistant vice provost for online programs. “You don’t have to sacrifice quality to do that. I see the pandemic accelerating the timeline of online degrees offered.”

Not to be confused with the high percentage of courses currently being offered online at UTSA in response to

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Doane Univeristy considers eliminating dozens of programs

Dozens of programs could be on the chopping block at Doane University in Crete.



a sign on a pole: Doane University in Crete


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Doane University in Crete

The school’s president called the cuts “strategic and necessary.”

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Others worry they cut to the heart of the institution’s liberal arts mission.

Junior sociology major Aidan Mendoza said students were notified Monday.

“It kind of caught me off guard getting the email,” Mendoza said.

Doane has just under a thousand students on campus and nearly 2,000 more online and at its Lincoln Campus.

Jeremy Henning, a junior History major said students have been told very little about the cuts.

“I personally am not very happy with it,” Henning said.

The list of recommended program eliminations includes: Asian Studies; Computational science/Computational Thinking; Criminal Justice; English as a Second Language; Film and Media Production; Gender Studies; German, and German as a secondary endorsement; Graphic Arts

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St. Paul district to reopen select special education schools, programs part-time Oct. 19

Some 500 special-education students can head back to school for in-person instruction and services two days a week starting Oct. 19, St. Paul Public Schools announced Friday.



a man wearing a suit and tie: St. Paul Public Schools Superintendent Joe Gothard speaks at a board meeting, April 9, 2019. (Scott Takushi / Pioneer Press)


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St. Paul Public Schools Superintendent Joe Gothard speaks at a board meeting, April 9, 2019. (Scott Takushi / Pioneer Press)

The district said it’s met all 24 self-imposed readiness targets for taking the first step toward a hybrid schedule.

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Just last week, the district said it didn’t have enough staff who were prepared to work in the schools that are reopening. The district said Friday that about 650 staff members will be involved in this initial phase of hybrid instruction.

The affected schools and programs are the Downtown School (Juvenile Detention Center), Care & Treatment programs, hospital programs, Bridge View, Focus Beyond (Pathways 1 and 2), RiverEast and Journeys.

Those programs are being prioritized

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