Vets school flooding temporarily relocates special education program to Saugus Middle-High School – News – Saugus Advertiser

Please support local journalism by subscribing at https://explore.mypapertoday.com/wickedlocalpremium

The special education program at Veterans Memorial Elementary School has been temporarily relocated to the new Saugus Middle-High School after the Hurd Avenue building sustained significant flood damage.

Last week, a grouping of Vets School special education students started their hybrid education at the Middle-High School, according to Executive Director of Pupil Personnel Services & Special Education Dawn Trainor.

A pod has been designated on the high school side of the Middle-High School to house the Vets School special education students, Trainor said.

Town Manager Scott Crabtree explained that in August, a faucet was left on when water service was restored following work at the Vets School and the first and second floors of a wing were flooded with hot water.

Crabtree said he dispatched cleaners to the Vets School as soon as the flood damage and mold were discovered.

School Committee

Read More

Hawaii to stop using online program after parent complaints

The department “recognizes the curriculum does contain content that reviewers found acceptable and aligned to standards, and will be working with schools that use Acellus to identify and leverage such content, as appropriate,” the letter said.

Acellus representatives didn’t return phone messages from The Associated Press Monday and Tuesday.

Schools across the nation use Acellus, according to the Missouri-based company.

Parental complaints have prompted schools in other states to drop the program.

“During the summer months, in an effort to respond quickly, Acellus was offered to families reluctant to physically send their child to school when the school year opened,” Kishimoto’s letter said.

Complaints included misspelling and mispronunciation of Queen Liliʻuokalani — the last monarch to rule the Hawaiian Kingdom — and racist depictions of Black Americans and Islamophobic stereotypes. Some have also complained the program lacks rigor.

School officials are working on a transition plan, Kishimoto’s letter said: “It

Read More

Special Olympics Maine recognizes Bath high school for inclusive program

Members of Morse High School’s unified sports teams accepted a banner from Special Olympics Maine Friday recognizing the school for its involvement in the organization’s Unified Champion Schools program. Kathleen O’Brien / The Times Record

BATH — It’s the last minute of the final game for Morse High School’s unified basketball team, which boasts an equal number of students with and without disabilities. Shots are taken, missed, and taken again as the clock ticks down until the buzzer sounds and every player, coach and spectator erupts into cheers, applause and congratulations. Who wins isn’t remembered, but the sense of acceptance every student feels will last a lifetime.

The unified basketball team is just one part of Morse High School’s involvement with Unified Champion Schools, a Special Olympics Maine program aimed at fostering a sense of social inclusion, respect and acceptance for all students and teachers. The Bath high school received

Read More

CISCRP To Host Online Health Education Program About Clinical Research on October 22 With Raleigh-Durham Focus

RALEIGH-DURHAM, N.C., Oct. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — The Center for Information and Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP) invites the Raleigh-Durham community to attend AWARE for All, a free online educational health event on Thursday, October 22nd, from 4-6pm EDT via a customized, secure online platform.

CISCRP’s AWARE for All – Raleigh-Durham program is supported by local research teams, advocacy groups, and a consortium of pharmaceutical, biotechnology and service provider organizations. The online program offers organizations the opportunity to bring educational health and clinical research information directly to diverse patient communities and the general public.

Around the world, people are living longer, healthier lives thanks to medical advancements and new treatments and drugs. But that reach could be even greater with increased diversity in clinical research participation. AWARE for All – Raleigh-Durham’s free online program aims to educate and empower the public in making informed decisions about clinical

Read More

Teddy Cops program encourages Katy ISD special needs children

Police officers can be intimidating to special needs children, so Luis Santiago, Katy Independent School District police officer, is changing that, one teddy bear at a time.

In a surprise Teddy Cop visit to a classroom at Wolman Elementary on Thursday, October 8, Santiago presented students with teddy bears that wore blue police uniforms. The Teddy Cop program began in 2015. Since then, Santiago has distributed more than 2,100 bears. He said police uniforms can scare children, and working to get past that fear is important. He took a knee as he handed out the bears and explained that police officers are friends.

“If we can teach them not to be afraid of the person in the uniform, we just made their life easier and made the officer’s life easier because now we’re learning about autism, how to interact with children with autism, how to communicate,” Santiago said.

He explained

Read More

Education, economic benefits possible from expansion of North Carolina school-choice program: Study

Giving parents the ability to choose what school their children attend could save North Carolina taxpayers money, among other benefits, according to a new study.



a little girl walking down the street


© Provided by Washington Examiner


Released this week by Raleigh-based conservative think tank Civitas Institute and libertarian think tank Reason Foundation, the study said establishing a statewide education savings account program in North Carolina could improve educational and socioeconomic outcomes.

Loading...

Load Error

“Statewide education savings accounts would put the power in the hands of families by funding students instead of school systems, just like we already do with many other taxpayer-funded initiatives,” wrote Corey DeAngelis, director of school choice for the Reason Foundation.

North Carolina’s education savings account program provides up to $9,000 a year for students with disabilities to attend a nonpublic school or home school. By looking at how the current program has affected academic achievement and educational attainment, researchers estimate a

Read More

Marshall School of Medicine announces community partners for new ‘Blessing Box’ Program | News

HUNTINGTON — The Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine has launched a blessing box program, through which it will partner with local organizations throughout southern West Virginia to help meet basic needs.

“A key component of health, well-being and long-term recovery is food security,” said Tina Ramirez, director of the Great Rivers Regional System for Addiction Care, who is administering the program. “The ‘take what you need, leave what you can’ philosophy behind blessing boxes meets an immediate need and will therefore be a blessing to both the donor and the recipient.”

The Community Blessing Box Program is funded through a grant from the Pallottine Foundation of Huntington. In addition to nonperishable food items, basic toiletries and baby supplies, such as wipes or diapers, are accepted at all blessing box locations. The project mirrors the model developed by Community Connections Inc., which partners with donors to supply blessing

Read More

Members of KPMG Future Leaders Program Step Up in Response to COVID-19

The KPMG Future Leaders Program, funded by net proceeds from the KPMG Women’s PGA Championship and KPMG Women’s Leadership Summit, awards top female high school seniors across the country the opportunity to enhance their personal growth through college scholarships, a leadership development retreat, a mentoring relationship with a woman business leader, and an introduction to golf.

Having recently celebrated its first graduating class, the program currently consists of 84 young women, many of whom are making a profound impact in their communities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Tea Binder

A member of the 2017 KPMG Future Leaders Program’s Class, Binder graduated from Vassar College in three years, earning degrees in Biology and Philosophy, with the dream to go to medical school. In her sophomore year, Binder enrolled in an EMT (Emergency Medical Technician) course, and developed a passion for the field after 16 hours of on-the-job shadowing in an ambulance. When

Read More

Special Education Students Speak to Vet For Employment Program

OAK FOREST, IL — Students in Bremen High School District’s Transitional Employment Program (TEP) participated in a virtual question and answer session with veterinarian, Dr. Abigail Roeters, from Mill Creek Animal Clinic in Palos Park.

On Sept. 24, students from district 228 met with Roeters virtually where they were able to ask questions and learn soft workplace skills, according to the district.

Students in the program are junior and senior special educations students who are preparing to graduate and enter the workforce, the district said. Teacher Christina Botica says her students have been learning about various soft skills in the workplace, such as communication, teamwork, listening, respect and responsibility.

The district said this opportunity gave students the chance to practice those soft skills, learn more about the veterinarian career and also learn about animals, such as own pets they may have at home.

“I am trying to introduce the students

Read More

New Ph.D. program will improve engineering education for all learners

This fall, the College of Engineering launched a Ph.D. in engineering education. The cross-disciplinary program will prepare graduates for research, academic and other demanding careers in engineering education from pre-kindergarten classrooms to workforce development.

For College of Engineering Dean Manos Maragakis, the recent approval of the program by the Nevada System of Higher Education is the culmination of a vision many years in the making.

“Six years ago, working with the College of Education, we began to develop ideas around the question of how do we best teach so that students can learn and retain engineering information, even at the earliest ages,” Maragakis said. “We decided to establish the engineering education program. With Adam Kirn and, later, Kelly Cross, we began laying the foundation for this important program, and we are very excited to see it is now moving to the next level by establishing a doctoral program.”

“Reimagining what

Read More