Pandemic Drives Working Americans to Seek Further Education

New survey from Bright Horizons EdAssist Solutions® reveals value of education opportunities, including promoting equity in the workplace

The COVID-19 pandemic ignited a shift in how working Americans view continuing education, according to a new survey commissioned by Bright Horizons EdAssist Solutions® (NYSE: BFAM). The survey revealed the 85% of full and part-time employed Americans feel employers need to rethink their benefits offerings in light of the pandemic.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201014005167/en/

What are employees looking for in this current climate? Education opportunities. 78% of working Americans believe the pandemic has increased the need for companies to support their employees with education benefits, including tuition reimbursement for degree and non-degree programs and student loan repayment programs.

What’s more, education benefits are not only driving employee motivation, but they may be a key factor in promoting workplace equality. According to the survey, nearly

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Pandemic Drives Working Americans to Seek Further Education – Press Release

WATERTOWN, Mass.–(Business Wire)–The COVID-19 pandemic ignited a shift in how working Americans view continuing education, according to a new survey commissioned by Bright Horizons EdAssist Solutions® (NYSE: BFAM). The survey revealed the 85% of full and part-time employed Americans feel employers need to rethink their benefits offerings in light of the pandemic.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201014005167/en/

What are employees looking for in this current climate? Education opportunities. 78% of working Americans believe the pandemic has increased the need for companies to support their employees with education benefits, including tuition reimbursement for degree and non-degree programs and student loan repayment programs.

What’s more, education benefits are not only driving employee motivation, but they may be a key factor in promoting workplace equality. According to the survey, nearly two-thirds of American workers (65 percent) think that providing education benefits to all employees helps promote racial

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Students Create Free Online Tutoring Services Amid Pandemic

(TNS) — Alex Yan and Arvin Ding, seniors at Irvine’s Portola High School in California, have held free weekly in-person tutoring sessions for elementary and middle school students since they started their organization Math at the Library in 2017.

When COVID-19 hit, their team of high schoolers quickly transitioned to online tutoring and later banded together with two other student volunteer organizations — Girls Empowering Girls, founded by Annette Yuan, a junior at Irvine High School, which offers one-on-one English conversation practice with language learners, and Code Champion, a coding class Ding started with his sophomore sister Cindy Ding — to form the nonprofit StudySmart Youth Services.

While the teens previously served their local community, now they tutor students from Seattle to Toronto.

The Irvine youths are part of a growing number of advantaged high school and college students across the country who have stepped up during campus shutdowns and

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Miami faculty adapt to online and hybrid teaching; developing tools and techniques that will serve students far beyond COVID-19 pandemic


By Cliff Peale,  director of executive communications

norm-krumpe-in-studio

Norm Krumpe in the home studio he shares with Jane Keiser (image courtesy Krumpe).

Across all of Miami University’s campuses, faculty are changing the way they teach.

  • In the nursing labs at Miami Regionals, Tina Andrews-Parks used help from the E-campus unit on the Hamilton and Middletown campuses to familiarize herself with SpeedGrader, where she can tabulate and analyze the responses to each question in seconds for her online class. “I won’t go backwards to paper testing,” she said.
  • In information systems and analytics, Bob Leonard uses software that enables students to analyze larger data sets in his online courses. “It’s going to be great bringing newly developed tools back to the classroom, because students will have that (online) scaffolding in addition to their professor as a resource,” he said.
  • In political science, Monica Schneider has recruited speakers to address her Campaigns and
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Kaiser Permanente Creates Social Health Playbook for COVID-19 Pandemic

OAKLAND, Calif., Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Kaiser Permanente, the nation’s largest integrated nonprofit health care system, has created guidance that can be widely adopted across the health care industry for assessing COVID-19 patients’ need for social resources that will allow them to safely recover and reduce community spread of the virus.

The Kaiser Permanente COVID-19 Social Health Playbook provides clinical care teams with guidance and tools for screening patients for social needs, connecting them to help, and following up to ensure their needs are met. The initial release of the playbook has a strong focus on addressing COVID-19 patients’ social needs to improve their health outcomes and to prevent further transmission of the virus. It is publicly available as a free resource for care providers across the industry.

Kaiser Permanente has already broadened the scope of its care and services to address crucial factors that affect people’s health,

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Online Classes Until 2021 For East Aurora Schools Due To Pandemic

AURORA, IL — Students in East Aurora District 131 will be learning from home for the rest of the year after officials again delayed their return to school amid the coronavirus pandemic.

With a “prevailing high number” of coronavirus cases in the Aurora area, district officials are now hoping to implement a hybrid learning plan in January, Superintendent Jennifer Norrell said in a letter to parents.

Flu Shot Clinic To Open Wednesday In North Aurora

The positivity rate in District 131’s main ZIP code, 60505, has often been twice or triple the statewide positivity rate, and almost half of the city’s 5,920 coronavirus cases, as of Sunday, were recorded in the same ZIP code, Norrell said.

District officials will continue to watch coronavirus trends in the area and will “certainly explore an earlier return” if it looks possible, Norrell said.

Kane County Sitting On $7M Surplus Of Coronavirus-Relief Funds

“For

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5 things that show students aren’t the only ones learning during the pandemic

Sally Purchase describes teaching in 2020 as taking an “old bag of tricks,” and trying to adapt them to a completely new environment.



a young boy standing next to a building: Esperance, 6, and Christina Maneno, 8, pose for a portrait as they return to Jefferson Elementary School on Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2020.


© Cory Morse | MLive.com/Cory Morse | MLive.com/mlive.com/TNS
Esperance, 6, and Christina Maneno, 8, pose for a portrait as they return to Jefferson Elementary School on Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2020.

“Never in my 33 years of teaching did I ever think it would be like this,” the Muskegon High School teacher said of virtual learning, which the district is using this semester to mitigate the spread of the coronavirus.

“It’s a huge learning curve.”

With Michigan K-12 schools back in session for the fall – some virtually, some in-person, and some a mix of both – students aren’t the only ones doing the learning this year. Amid this unprecedented school year, teachers are learning some new things along the way, too.

The coronavirus pandemic has changed almost

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Old learning concept can help students without resources learn online amid the pandemic

DENVER (KDVR) – Schools long-used to in-person classes have been forced to try new tactics to keep students safe amid the COVID-19 pandemic, and some are turning to an old concept to make online learning more successful.

Thousands of students in the Adams 12 school district are getting a boost in their remote education with the help of learning pods, a years-old concept that physically brings students together in a common space with adult support.

“It’s a lot more helpful because we get to be with someone who could help us in our classroom,” said 10-year-old Christina Chavez, a 5th grader at Hillcrest Elementary School.  “At home, our parents could (help me), but sometimes they couldn’t understand all the stuff because it’s different from what they learned.”

Christina Chavez, a 5th grader, enjoys attending a learning pod at Hillcrest Elementary School in Colorado (KDVR Photo/Lori Jane Gliha)
Christina Chavez, a 5th grader, attends a learning pod at Hillcrest Elementary School in Colorado (KDVR Photo/Lori Jane Gliha)

Chavez is among nearly

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Champaign Special Education Teacher explains how she’s adapting to the pandemic | Top Stories

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. (WAND) – One special education teacher in Champaign loves her job, and this pandemic has made her realize why. 

Katie Smith teaches at Barkstall Elementary School. As a special education teacher, she loves making her students feel just like everyone else. 

“My favorite part of being a special ed teacher is working with students who have either internalized or been told, directly or indirectly that they are somehow less than, and showing them that with hard work, and with the right teaching strategies they can learn,” Smith told WAND News.

But the pandemic brought challenges to her teaching. Smith, along with her students, had to get over the technology curve. “I had never zoomed, I have never made a Google slide assignment, ” said Smith. “I had never had to describe to students in action I want them to do without them having visual cues.”

But this only

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CSU sees 12% drop in freshman enrollment during pandemic, but online education surging

Enrollment at Colorado State University is down in multiple categories — freshmen, undergraduates, international students and first-generation students — though the number of people signing up for online education has risen, a reflection of student behavior during the COVID-19 era, university officials said Friday.

Total enrollment on the Fort Collins campus decreased 3.6%, with a total headcount of 27,835 this fall, and 3.3% at the Pueblo campus, for a total of 3,716 students this semester.

“Remarkably during a pandemic year, CSU Pueblo increased student retention more than at any time in the last decade (a 5 percentage point increase) and CSU in Fort Collins held steady, retaining 85.3% of its 2019 freshman class, exactly the same percentage as the previous year when COVID-19 was not a factor,” CSU officials said in a news release.

The Fort Collins campus welcomed 23,590 undergraduates this fall, a 4.1% decline from last year with

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