UC Nobel winners underscore value of investments in higher education

The awarding of the Nobel Prizes to three University of California faculty members this month underscores the importance of the state’s world-class public higher education system to advancing the pace of discovery and innovation that fuels economic growth and improves lives.

UC Berkeley biochemist Jennifer Doudna shared the 2020 Nobel Prize in chemistry with colleague Emmanuelle Charpentier for the co-development of CRISPR-Cas9, a genome editing breakthrough that has revolutionized biomedicine.

This technology allows scientists to rewrite DNA — the code of life — in any organism, including human cells. It has opened the door to treatments for thousands of diseases as well as new possibilities across biology and agriculture.

UC Berkeley Professor emeritus Reinhard Genzel and UCLA Professor Andrea Ghez shared half of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics for “the discovery of a supermassive compact object at the centre of our galaxy.”

They join a proud legacy of the

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Coursera Couple Returns to Higher Ed With $14.5M to Recreate In-Person Learning, Online

Pandemic closes school. Students go home. Remote classes falter. Child is disengaged. Parent builds edtech.

So goes the origin story of many education startups born this year, like ClassEDU, which raised $16 million to put some oomph in Zoom classrooms. It was started by one of the co-founders of Blackboard, now a household name in education technology.

Now, a couple with similar industry cred has a similar vision—along with plenty of funding.

“We want to build from the ground up an inclusive learning system for students and faculty, one that can recreate engaging, live learning experiences online,” says Dan Avida.

Avida is the husband of Coursera co-founder Daphne Koller, and one of the first board members of the company that helped put the spotlight on massive online open courses, or MOOCs. The couple is no longer with Coursera, which is now valued at $2.5 billion. But they are not done

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Matrics: Don’t Delay Your Higher Education Applications

With about 30 days left before the start of the 2020 Matric exams, the focus of Grade 12s is now firmly on the final preparation for this important milestone. But they should also take some time to finalise their Higher Education plans for next year, as the clock is ticking on closing dates for applications.

“Matrics cannot wait until they receive their results – currently scheduled for release on February 23 next year – before applying, as this will most likely mean they miss out on a space at their institution and for their qualification of choice as deadlines at many institutions are still in place,” says Peter Kriel, General Manager at The Independent Institute of Education, SA’s largest and most accredited private higher education institution.

“Beyond a later start to the higher education academic year it is still not clear what else higher education will need to do in

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‘Opportunity has been missed’ in higher education

The first Budget from the country’s first dedicated Department of Further and Higher Education evoked a mixed reaction, with student leaders claiming it ignored barriers preventing access to college in favour of piecemeal one-off funding.

There was a general welcome for the focus it put on higher education, and some praise for the commitment minister Simon Harris is bringing to the role, but there was also criticism of “missed opportunities”.

The €3.3bn 2021 spend includes €50m to be paid directly to about 200,000 full-time students this year – €250 each – to help soften the Covid-19 financial blow.

Union of Students in Ireland (USI) president Lorna Fitzpatrick welcomed it, but said the Government failed to address the “underlying problem – that students face the highest fees in the EU”.

Other commitments include:

:: Retaining almost 2,300 college places created this year – and adding a further 2,700;

:: Review of

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Private higher education institutions exempted from running exams in states under conditional MCO, says ministry

PETALING JAYA: Private higher education institutions have been exempted by the Higher Education Ministry to run exams during the conditional movement control order (MCO).

The exemptions are for exams conducted by external examination providers or international exams during the conditional MCO period, according to the schedule that has been set, the ministry said.

“This decision involves a total of 3,031 local students and 195 international students in four states that’s under the conditional MCO.

“Students must get a letter of confirmation from their respective institutions,” the ministry said in a statement on Wednesday (Oct 14).

Exams under three categories are involved in the exemption.

The first group are students undertaking the A-Levels, Australian Matriculation, Canadian pre-university and the like.

The second are students who have registered to sit for the exam with external exam providers or for international exams, and lastly, students who have registered to sit for the Association

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MATC to continue mostly online learning for spring semester; reports 25 COVID cases | Higher education



Madison College health screener

MATC students must take a health survey and present a green “checkmark” clearing them of COVID-19 symptoms to a security guard before coming onto campus.




Madison Area Technical College expects to follow the same playbook it used this fall for the spring semester: most classes delivered online and students and employees completing a health survey before they can enter campus buildings.

Officials at MATC, also known as Madison College, plan to keep roughly the same ratio of classes, with 70% of them delivered online, 5% taught in-person and 25% operating in a hybrid format, where some elements of the class take place face-to-face and others are delivered online.

Student registration for the spring semester began Monday.



Turina Bakken

Bakken




“We want to offer as much certainty to students and faculty as the uncertainty continues to exist,” Provost Turina Bakken said in an interview. “We

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Higher Ed’s Shameful Silence on Diversity

This past summer, far-right media outlets from Fox News to Breitbart flooded the airwaves and the internet with stories about diversity training within the federal government. These features castigated the programs, accusing them of encouraging discrimination against white people, especially white men, by promoting ideas of white racial inferiority.

This, of course, was nonsense. Diversity training does no such thing.

Mary Morten, the president and founder of a company that conducts racial-equity trainings for government agencies and nonprofits, explained recently that the interactive trainings they lead simply “do a variety of things to make sure that people understand some of the history of what bias has looked like in this country, [and] what power and privilege have looked like.” She added that at the end of their sessions, there is always “some action planning” designed to help participants figure out how they can take what they learned and “embed

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With the Coronavirus, Higher Education Suffers Enormous Losses

On university and college campuses, it’s been a back-to-school season like none other. COVID-19 outbreaks have forced entire residence halls and sports teams to quarantine, and, for some institutions, could prompt a premature end to the semester. Other campuses are ghost towns, as instruction has moved completely online. The pandemic has transformed teaching and learning, how research is conducted⎯the very rhythms of campus life.

The contagion’s impact on international education has been especially acute. With closed borders, shuttered consulates and airline restrictions, study abroad and foreign exchange programs have been canceled, while the United States is all but off-limits for new international students. Some have chosen to take classes online, but many have put off their studies. No other demographic group has experienced such deep enrollment declines this fall, according to preliminary data from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, an education policy think tank. Estimates suggest as many as

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Higher Education Market| Emergence of Transitional Education (TNE) to Boost the Market Growth

The higher education market size is poised to grow by USD 37.82 billion during 2020-2024, according to the latest report by Technavio. The report offers an up-to-date analysis regarding the current market scenario, latest trends and drivers, and the overall market environment. The report also provides the market impact and new opportunities created due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Download a Free Sample of REPORT with COVID-19 Crisis and Recovery Analysis.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201013005774/en/

Technavio has announced its latest market research report titled Global Higher Education Market 2020-2024 (Graphic: Business Wire)

The growth of internationalization in the education sector is one of the key factors driving the higher education market growth. The rising need to attract the best students and staff, improve the quality of education, and generate revenue is leading several higher education institutions to internationalize education. This emerging concept has

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How the US Department of Education can protect students and promote equity in higher education

Higher education was at a crossroads even before the COVID-19 crisis. In recent years, the cost of college attendance has risen and student debt levels have exploded. Discussions about debt forgiveness and reconfiguring higher education finance have moved out of wonky policy circles and into public discourse. Meanwhile, the costs of college have risen dramatically in recent years, perhaps exacerbated by decreases in state funding, and leading many institutions of higher education (“IHEs”) to provide online and lower-cost solutions to supplement or replace the “traditional” four-year, residential college—a trend that will be accelerated by the COVID-19 crisis. Simultaneously, college demographics have shifted, with an increasing population of “nontraditional” students, including those who are older, lack financial support from parents or other family members, and are more likely to have dependents. Disparities in higher education have had disproportionate, negative, and long-lasting effects on Black and Latino communities. And COVID-19 continues has

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