5 takeaways from Day 2 of the Coney Barrett Supreme Court hearings

WASHINGTON — Judge Amy Coney Barrett worked hard at redefining her image as an unwavering conservative jurist on her first long day of questioning Tuesday by a deeply divided Senate Judiciary Committee whose minds already are made up about her.

Barrett repeatedly dodged questions about how she viewed or would rule on striking down Roe v. Wade, overturning the Affordable Care Act and challenges to gun safety laws under the Second Amendment, citing what’s called the Ginsburg rule.

When the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg appeared before the committee in her confirmation process, Barrett noted that she “used this to describe how a nominee should comport herself at a hearing: ‘No hints, no previews, no forecast.’ “

But Barrett remained closely identified with her mentor, Justice Antonin Scalia, and his conservatism and judicial philosophy, and that troubled Democrats who pointed out that she would replace the high court’s liberal lion.

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Amy Coney Barrett faces questions on Day 2 of Senate hearings

Washington — Judge Amy Coney Barrett is facing questions before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday for the second day of her confirmation hearings, with the panel’s members getting their first chance to press President Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court on her legal views and writings.

Barrett, 48, is fielding questions from Democrats on the 22-member committee about her views on abortion and the Affordable Care Act, which has become a focal point of their opposition to her nomination to fill the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat on the high court. 

Senator Dianne Feinstein, the committee’s top Democrat, asked Barrett whether she believes Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision that established a woman’s right to an abortion, was rightly decided.

Barrett declined to say one way or another, saying her role as a sitting judge precluded her from commenting on precedents that continue to

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First day of Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett concludes

WASHINGTON (NewsNation Now) — President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett appeared before the Senate for the first day of confirmation hearings Monday.

The Senate Judiciary Committee hearings will span four days, beginning with members and Barrett herself making opening statements.

Stream the hearings live right here; check back for live updates.

Opening statements

Senator Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., made the first opening statement before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Monday for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett. Graham, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, discussed the legacy of late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

“This is a vacancy that has occurred to a tragic loss of a great woman. And we’re going to fill that vacancy with another great woman. The bottom line here is that the senate is doing its duty. Constitutionally,” said Graham.

Graham went on to reiterate Barrett’s written statement sent to the

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Amy Coney Barrett Confirmation Hearings: Highlights of Day 1

Here’s what you need to know:

Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

A deeply divided Senate Judiciary Committee kicked off four days of contentious confirmation hearings on Monday for Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court, drawing battle lines that could reverberate through the election.

Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina and the committee’s chairman, left little doubt about where the proceedings were heading, gaveling open “the hearing to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court,” rather than saying it was a hearing to consider her nomination.

“This is probably not about persuading each other unless something really dramatic happens,” Mr. Graham added a short time later. “All the Republicans will vote yes, all the Democrats will vote no.”

Democrats arrived ready to go on the offensive, portraying

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Online learning emerges as a key issue from Tennessee House hearings

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — School online learning emerged as one of the key issues during ten-hour hearings by Tennessee state lawmakers that wrapped up Wednesday.

“We are going to have our hands full and we all need to be on the same page,” said House Education Committee Chair Mark White.

It was a statement about the delicate nature of Tennessee K-12 education as schools re-open in the age of COVID-19.

Online learning is key because it’s estimated that half of the state’s million students are presently doing it.

One figure drawing attention during the hearing this week was underachieving students falling potentially two grades behind since the start of the pandemic.

Issues with online learning often are blamed as students, teachers, and parents are learning about virtual education.

Districts like Metro Nashville Public Schools are already addressing the kind of issues faced by school parents like Tim Johnson. He’s been

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