How Hong Kong Education Bureau can do more to halt discussion of independence in schools



a man and a woman sitting at a table: Permanent Secretary for Education Michelle Li and Secretary for Education Kevin Yeung meet the press at the government headquarters in Admiralty on October 6. Photo: Dickson Lee


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Permanent Secretary for Education Michelle Li and Secretary for Education Kevin Yeung meet the press at the government headquarters in Admiralty on October 6. Photo: Dickson Lee

A primary schoolteacher has been deregistered for allegedly promoting discussion of Hong Kong independence and will be barred from working as a teacher in the city for the rest of his life. The case has sparked a great deal of public discussion on this subject in recent days.

As Secretary for Education Kevin Yeung Yun-hung pointed out, the Education Bureau advised as far back as 2016 that the topic was not fit for discussion on campus. The Basic Law clearly stipulates that Hong Kong is an inseparable part of China (“Teachers told to steer clear of Hong Kong independence discussions”, October 6).

Mr Yeung also said that if independence were to be addressed at all, it should be to point out

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‘We don’t have any say.’ For TDSB’s adult learners chaotic planning and a lack of online options threatens to halt their education

Desrine Peters, 43, moved to Canada 10 years ago from Jamaica and had been working in security, but found there wasn’t much room for progress in the field. “I was finding myself not accomplishing my goals,” she said.

Peters is now a first-year student at Seneca College in the chemical lab technician program, and has plans to continue studying biochemistry. She credits her adult day school teachers with motivating her and encouraging her to continue her studies.

Two years ago she began taking classes at the TDSB’s Emery Adult Learning Centre to complete high school credits needed for her college program. When the COVID-19 pandemic created hiccups in education and moved things online in the spring, she finished that semester and took summer school so she would be able to continue to college this fall.

But for students who were looking to return to adult day school this quadmester, the

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