How to spot gender and education bias in a job advert

A job advert can reveal quite a lot about whether an employer holds any biased views. Photo: Getty
A job advert can reveal quite a lot about whether an employer holds any biased views. Photo: Getty

Job hunting is a challenging process. Not only is it time-consuming, it’s also tricky to determine whether a position is for you simply from the description alone. Sometimes, you’ll need to get to the interview stage before you can find out more about the employer and the workplace culture.

That being said, a job advert can give away more than an employer realises. And more specifically, it can reveal quite a lot about whether they hold any biased views — unconscious or otherwise — on gender, education, class and other characteristics. So how can you spot the red flags in a job advert?

Be wary of a long list of desired skills and expected experience

Of course, some jobs require specific skills or more experience than others. But an unreasonably long list

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Massachusetts poll: Race, education, gender may influence some divergent views about death

Last Words, a three-part Globe Spotlight Team series, exposes the inequities that follow people in Massachusetts to their very last breaths. It is a deep examination into the uncomfortable topic of death, and confronts the state’s failure to protect its most vulnerable in the early days of a historic pandemic. Read the Globe Spotlight report.

A Boston Globe-Suffolk University poll late last year shows that, for the most part, Massachusetts residents share widespread agreement on issues related to the difficult subject of death.

They say society would be better off if end-of-life issues were discussed more openly and believe terminally ill patients should have more options to choose when and how to die. A sizable majority say they would prefer to die at home, and many men and women have first-hand experience with hospice, according to the poll of some 500 residents across the state.

But some major —

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Race, education, gender may influence some divergent views about death

Last Words, a three-part Globe Spotlight Team series, exposes the inequities that follow people in Massachusetts to their very last breaths. It is a deep examination into the uncomfortable topic of death, and confronts the state’s failure to protect its most vulnerable in the early days of a historic pandemic. Read the Globe Spotlight report.



a person sitting at a table in front of a mirror: Danvers resident John Barbieri looks over a collage of photos of his late wife, Ann "Peachie" Barbieri. They were married for more than 60 years.


© Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff
Danvers resident John Barbieri looks over a collage of photos of his late wife, Ann “Peachie” Barbieri. They were married for more than 60 years.

A Boston Globe-Suffolk University poll late last year shows that, for the most part, Massachusetts residents share widespread agreement on issues related to the difficult subject of death.

They say society would be better off if end-of-life issues were discussed more openly and believe terminally ill patients should have more options to choose when and how to die. A sizable majority say they would

Read More

Higher education board looks at gender equity – News – Rockford Register Star

‘We have a lot of work to do,’ board chair says

SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois Board of Higher Education is preparing a strategic plan to make higher education more equitable in the state.

Members put their focus on gender disparities at their regular meeting last week.

While the plan will be released for public scrutiny between December and March of next year, since August, the board has shared presentations on different forms of equity at its monthly meetings.

The board noted in a news release that African American men are far less likely to be enrolled in an undergraduate education compared to women of the same race. The same holds true for Latino men, although undergraduate enrollment for Latino men and women has increased since 2013. Enrollment trends for Latinos, while not at the same level as white Illinoisans, have generally increased over the past decade and continue to improve.

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