Grower wants to educate attendees at this year’s Fresh Summit

Educating the industry. That is the approach one grower is taking towards this year’s PMA’s virtual Fresh Summit Show, starting today. 

“The virtual format gives us the opportunity to teach and educate the industry, especially those who usually aren’t able to experience the field first hand,” says Nichole Towell, senior director of marketing and package procurement for Duda Farm Fresh Foods. “This gives everyone a front row seat to the supply chain. This new format also still allows product demonstrations to take place even when we cannot meet in person.”

For Duda, that supply chain includes its Dandy Super Sweet Corn that it’s currently harvesting in Georgia but will transition to Florida in early to mid-November. “Hurricane Sally has created some challenges due to the amount of rain received in the region. But the outlook is improving and moving in the right direction.” She adds that markets are above average

Read More

Opinion | Everything I Know About Elite America I Learned From ‘Fresh Prince’ and ‘West Wing’

It turns out, as the show’s creator, Aaron Sorkin, has explained, if I didn’t like the show, that’s in part because I wasn’t really meant to. The pilot episode didn’t test well with people like me. But, according to Mr. Sorkin, it tested “extremely well” with certain audience segments. Among them: households that earned more than $75,000 a year, households with at least one college graduate and households that subscribed to The New York Times.

And though the show was not my favorite, I was fascinated by its characters. They were constantly engaged in debates about contentious social and political issues. One plotline I found particularly interesting was when President Bartlet’s deputy communications director, Sam Seaborn, loses a debate against a Republican woman named Ainsley Hayes. To her surprise, Hayes is subsequently offered a job in the Democratic administration; the president cites her “sense of civic duty.”

The more I

Read More

Higher education minister foresees 75,000 fresh grads struggling to get jobs in Covid-19 era



Noraini Ahmad wearing a purple shirt: Higher Education Minister Datuk Noraini Ahmad speaks during The Ministry of Higher Education-Career Advancement Programme (KPT-CAP) Economic Recovery Plan (Penjana) at University Kebangsaan Malaysia in Bangi September 28, 2020. ― Picture by Yusof Mat Isa


© Provided by Malay Mail
Higher Education Minister Datuk Noraini Ahmad speaks during The Ministry of Higher Education-Career Advancement Programme (KPT-CAP) Economic Recovery Plan (Penjana) at University Kebangsaan Malaysia in Bangi September 28, 2020. ― Picture by Yusof Mat Isa

BANGI, Sept 28 — The economic challenges caused by the Covid-19 pandemic could add more hurdles to some 75,000 fresh graduates in finding employment this year, Higher Education Minister Datuk Seri Noraini Ahmad said today.

She said the estimation is based on last year’s unemployment figures among fresh graduates, where out of 330,557 persons, 41,161 or 13.8 per cent remain unemployed.

“In 2020, it is estimated that 300,000 graduates are due to complete their respective education. Taking into account the impact of Covid-19, the ministry estimates that 25 per cent or 75,000 potential graduates will have their employment opportunities disrupted, six months after they graduated.

“Therefore, based on 41,161 graduates

Read More