I’m an Educator, and I Find Distance Learning Hard to Manage

Close up of a young boy studying and doing homework using his laptop

This morning, I try to get my twins to draw their favorite animal, an assignment we were supposed to have done for kindergarten yesterday. One sobs because her deer does not look like a deer. I want to sit with her but I forgot to print the alphabet for today and I can’t find the password to GoogleClassroom and I don’t know which app is for math. I squeeze my eyes shut and whisper, “I am doing the best I can” — and I almost believe it. I have a PhD in education. I am supposed to be able to figure this out. Professionally, I run parenting groups for families raising spirited kids who want to parent gently and positively. I have written papers on digital literacy, and I regularly consult with school districts on how to support social emotional development during distance learning. And yet, I am failing distance-learning

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Waterbury Teachers Find Creative Ways to Educate English Learners Virtually

Teachers in Waterbury are trying to be more resourceful and creative when it comes to educating children who do not speak English as a first language.



a group of people sitting at a desk with a computer in an office: English learners in the classroom at Crosby High in Waterbury


© Provided by NBC Connecticut

English learners in the classroom at Crosby High in Waterbury


There are more than 2,800 English as a second language learners in the district, according to school officials. Spanish and Albanian are the other dominant languages in the city.

“As an ESL teacher you’re very dramatic, you act things out, you color code, you put things in two different languages sometimes to make sure that students are understanding what you’re saying,” said Pamela Loh, a teacher at Wilby High School.

Students in Waterbury Public Schools are simultaneously learning on the computer in class and at home.

The biggest challenges English learners often face is interpreting the directions, Loh said. So it takes extra effort and one-on-one support to

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Santa Fe district struggles to find volunteer teachers for hybrid learning | Education

Teaching vacancies at Santa Fe Public Schools are in line with previous years, even amid the coronavirus pandemic.

But the district is still struggling to find enough teachers to volunteer to reenter schools under a hybrid learning model it will implement later this month.

The district reported 21 teaching vacancies affecting 11 elementary, community and middle schools, and no principal or assistant principal openings Wednesday. Only one school had more than two openings, with Ortiz Middle School reporting seven as the first quarter of the year comes to a close Friday.

Superintendent Veronica García said the figure is on par with the average number of openings the district has had over the past several years.

“The numbers vary and the reasons vary,” García said. “We’ve worked hard at recruitment and retention, but this seems to have been our range as far as vacancies this year.”

Of the openings, six involved

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Questions about education elections? Find answers here

As early voting begins today for the Nov. 3 general election, Arizonans with questions about education initiatives, school bond, override and capital override elections have several resources to help them make informed decisions.

“Education is not a partisan issue,” said Christine Thompson, president and CEO of Expect More Arizona. “From the top of the ballot to the bottom, there are issues and offices that significantly impact every level of education in Arizona.”

“Before voting, citizens can do a little research to gain a better understanding of what authority elected officials wield,” Thompson said. “Before filling out their ballot, voters can ask candidate questions and see who best aligns with their views and priorities on education issues. “

While each school district’s website, county recorder’s website, and local media provide the facts on how these elections benefit students and impact taxpayers, this week voters can also view two online

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Education Leader: Kansas schools must find better solution

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Kansas state education commissioner Randy Watson said schools will need to rethink the way they deliver education amid the coronavirus pandemic because what is happening now is “not sustainable.”

The Topeka Capital-Journal reports that Watson told members of the Kansas Association of School Boards on Friday that one of the best solutions is to return students for five-day-a-week learning, while keeping class sizes to fewer than 15 students while requiring masks and social distancing.

Watson said schools may need to partner with other organizations in the community, like churches or businesses that are closed anyway because of the pandemic to get enough room to space out students.

Watson also suggested that schools look internally for backup and use non-teaching school staff — like librarians, paraeducators, substitute teachers, central office staff and reading specialists — to fill the ranks.

“Everyone is going to have to be a

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Kansas schools must find better solution

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Kansas state education commissioner Randy Watson said schools will need to rethink the way they deliver education amid the coronavirus pandemic because what is happening now is “not sustainable.”

The Topeka Capital-Journal reports that Watson told members of the Kansas Association of School Boards on Friday that one of the best solutions is to return students for five-day-a-week learning, while keeping class sizes to fewer than 15 students while requiring masks and social distancing.

Watson said schools may need to partner with other organizations in the community, like churches or businesses that are closed anyway because of the pandemic to get enough room to space out students.

Watson also suggested that schools look internally for backup and use non-teaching school staff — like librarians, paraeducators, substitute teachers, central office staff and reading specialists — to fill the ranks.

“Everyone is going to have to be

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Michigan education leaders find relief in 2021 budget

Michigan education leaders were bracing for tough financial decisions next year as the COVID-19 pandemic persists.



a close up of a sign: MLive file photo of Maple Street Magnet School for the Arts in Kalamazoo, Michigan on Tuesday, October 29, 2019.


© Emil Lippe | MLive.com/Emil Lippe | MLive.com/mlive.com/TNS
MLive file photo of Maple Street Magnet School for the Arts in Kalamazoo, Michigan on Tuesday, October 29, 2019.

But school boards and educators are now breathing a sigh of relief, with Gov. Gretchen Whitmer preparing to sign the 2021 budget approved by the legislature last week.

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Michigan’s education spending for K-12 schools, community colleges and universities clocks in at about $17.65 billion, with the School Aid Fund budget coming in at roughly $15.5 billion. The School Aid Fund budget increased by about $300 million compared to the 2019-20 budget.

Read more: 7 things you should know about Michigan’s new budget

“Based on what we were hearing months ago, how can we not be anything but pleased?” said Don Wotruba, executive director for the

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75,000 new grads will struggle to find jobs, says minister



Noraini Ahmad in a blue shirt: Higher Education Minister Noraini Ahmad says about 116,000 graduates need to be given attention.


© Provided by Free Malaysia Today
Higher Education Minister Noraini Ahmad says about 116,000 graduates need to be given attention.

BANGI: About 75,000 out of 300,000 fresh graduates are projected to encounter some challenges in finding jobs within six months after graduation following the impact of Covid-19, said Higher Education Minister Noraini Ahmad.

She said the ministry’s Graduate Tracer Study for 2019 showed that 41,161 graduates remained unemployed. With an additional 75,000 to graduate this year it is estimated that 116,161 graduates need to be given attention to further increase their marketability.

Noraini said that several steps had been implemented by the ministry to help affected graduates by providing funding assistance to those who want to pursue a tertiary education.

The funding assistance includes MyBrain Science, Higher Education Minister scholarships and financial assistance for students with disabilities, she said.

Job matching process for unemployed graduates, in collaboration with the Social

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Teachers Find Higher Pay and Growing Options in Covid Pods

Krissy Rand has more than a decade of experience teaching special education to elementary school students, most recently in the Salem, Mass., public school district. She calls last spring’s remote teaching a nightmare, and was disheartened to learn about her school’s Covid-19 fall guidelines. With no library or gym time, “you’re basically a prisoner in your classroom,” she says.

The 39-year-old Ms. Rand put out her résumé. Eight groups of families contacted her within three days. She now makes more money teaching six first-graders from six families in Wellesley, Mass. They are following their public school’s curriculum, and she’s added cooking, yoga and earth sciences, with lots of hands-on experiments. She loves that there are no rules and administrative red tape, and no sitting through long meetings.

“It’s a teacher’s dream,” she says. “The day flies by.”

Long underpaid and underappreciated, teachers are finding more career options as demand for

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